Interview with Dead Label

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Interview with Dead Label – Hammerfest X 17.03.2018

One band that Rick and I were looking forward to talking to at Hammerfest were Dead Label, a riff laden Metalcore band from Celbridge, Ireland. Many things interest us about this band, including the fact that they are only a three piece, the fact that they have a female drummer, and the fact that they did a spectacular video last year for their single release. We were intrigued to find out their views on gigging, writing, and that video, so we sat down with Claire (Drums), Danny (Guitar) and Dan (Bass / Vocals) for a chat.

So, who are Dead Label? How did you get together? Where did you start from, and when did it all come together?

Danny: Well me and Claire have been playing together forever – since we were about 14, but we chopped and changed a lot of members. The first time we were actually a proper metal band, we were a band called VX. We had five members, then we split, and we couldn’t really find anybody else with the same kind of commitment, so it was just me, Dan, and Claire and we said, ‘fuck it, we’ll try it as a three piece and see how we go!’ That was about 10 years ago!

Claire: When we were in band previously, we were looking for a bass player and Dan applied. When we went to pick him up for his try outs, he was outside waiting with all his bass gear ready to go and it was like, ‘ok, that’s the guy!’, and he’s been here ever since! And then we found out he could do vocals to and that was it!

Do you like playing as a three piece then?

Dan: Yeah – we have a very, very…… strange relationship, where the three of us know what is going on the whole time! It’s a rare thing to get in a band. We all know exactly what’s going on and how each other’s doing without a single word being spoken. I think if we were to add another person into that mix, they wouldn’t get it. We did try out a second guitarist a couple of years ago and it just didn’t work. The void in the room was just off. Yeah ok the sound was bigger, but it just wasn’t the same, so we just stuck with the three of us, and we’re all fully committed, so that’s the way it is.

Is that how you approach writing songs as well then?

Danny: Yeah, well I think we are kind of old school by today’s standards, but we just get in a room and jam. We don’t really do this sending each other riffs, or work over laptops or anything. We just plug in and jam.

Dan: We kind of judge it off the reaction, you know, we jam a riff and your like ‘yeah that works’. We practice two or three times a week, either just running through the set, or writing, and it comes together.

Claire: Yeah if there is a week where one of us is away or something it’s just bad – we are texting all the time like ‘eeeek’.

Dan: Yeah sometimes it is not so much that we want to, it’s that we need to do it three times a week to keep it tight.

I suppose as well when there is only three of you, there is nowhere to hide really.

Dan: Yeah exactly, and we are old school in that sense too. We don’t like to use backing tracks or stems or anything like that – it is literally just the three of us kind of turning up to play at the venue with nothing but our guitars… and drums! We Just play, we don’t need a laptop. We’re not relying on anyone.

Danny: That actually happened to us before. We were playing at Made In Metal, and we were supposed to be borrowing our friends’ gear, but they got held up in traffic or something, so we literally only had our guitars and stage backline, and we were just like ‘Right I’ll plug in to that Marshall amp, you plug in to that one’ and we had a great fucking show!!

Dan: So yeah, we are very traditional in that sense, you know, we play together as a band, we write songs as a band and that’s the way that we do it!

Is it your first time playing Hammerfest, and your first time playing in Wales?

Claire: First time playing in Hammerfest – err, have we played in Wales before… No, I don’t think we have – we spend a lot of time driving through Wales!! But I think this is our very first time playing in Wales.

Dan: No, we did a music video here!

Claire: Yes, thank you, yes, we did the video for Salvation In Sacrifice here – in Cardiff.

Cool! So, what is in the pipeline at the moment – are you working on an album or anything?

Dan: We’re writing at the moment, and we are quite deep into that. We currently have about eight songs that we are very, very happy with. Right now, it is just about manipulating them a bit and putting the finishing touches on them.

Danny: Yeah, the salt and pepper!

Dan: So, once we get home after this we are going to bury our heads in the sand and get back to it and we are hoping to have the album out by probably the end of this year, maybe early next year.

Are you having a break from gigs while you are doing that?

Claire: Kind of. If the right gig comes up then obviously we would say yes, but we’re not actively chasing gigs, because we want to get it finished. With gigs like Hammerfest, you have to be prepared, and you can’t really get lost in writing a song, then practice a set, because it’s two different things. So, if an opportunity comes up like this, we’ll take it, but we’re concentrating more on the writing. We are playing Bloodstock though! And Amplified as well.

Yeah, we are going to be at Amplified so we will get to see you properly then! So, Bloodstock – great festival – how excited are you about playing there? Is it your first time there?

Claire: It’s actually our second time! We played there in 2015, and we are dying to get back! They do a kind of rotation, which is fair, but we’ve got really lucky because we are playing the same day as Gojira, which is one of our favourite bands, so we are going to play hopefully an awesome set and then watch Gojira! You don’t really get much better than that!

That leads us on nicely to the next question – who are your main influences and what inspired you to start making music?

Dan: I think for me and Danny, the routes of it all is Thin Lizzy. That’s were my love of music really started – you know the Renegade album, the Jailbreak album and it was like ‘this is awesome – oh Jesus they’re Irish!’ Then someone gave me the Black album and it was just a slippery slope from there! You know in a few years’ time you find yourself listening to Behemoth!

Danny: Thin Lizzy to Behemoth you know! Yeah, I think in the early days, for me, and Dead Label, the band that really tied it together was Machine Head. I was just fascinated with the heaviness and it’s really what we have been after since – to try and get that heavy sound, without it sounding chaotic. So, Machine Head was at the core of it, but then yeah, Behemoth, Gojira, all sorts – we like everything! I think those big, fat, heavy riffs are the core.

Rick: Yeah, I think your music is really groove laden – you’ve got the harsh vocal, but there’s some real power behind those riffs and I like that – when you can move to the riffs behind the vocals, and I think that’s what you’ve got.

Claire: Yeah that’s it. Machine Head are a humongous influence on me – Dave McClain is just the best drummer in the whole world. But my first drumming influence, way back, besides Animal, was Travis Barker. He was so cool, and I was just fascinated by drums because of him, then I actually got in to heavy metal!

How old where you when you started playing?

Claire: Thirteen or Fourteen I think. I got drums and got into a band two or three days later, but I couldn’t really play! I’ve been in a band ever since!

Dan: Yeah that really makes you up your game, because before I met these guys, I was playing in indie rock bands, you know I was there, into heavy metal with tattoos and stuff, but the only bands I could find were Indie bands and I had to play with them, so your playing little bass licks here and there, but when you get into a metal band, you really have to up your game! And these guys pushed me to be a better musician.

One thing I wanted to ask you is what is the metal scene like in Ireland? Is it difficult to get gigs? We interviewed Baleful Creed recently and they said it was really tough – people go to the bigger bands, but people don’t want to come out for the small gigs. Do you find this?

Dan: Yeah that is true to a certain point, but you can get lucky as well – you know when the stars align, and people want rock bands – when we first started, on a Friday and Saturday night in Belfast, you always played to two or three hundred people and they were there for the music. It kind of fell by the wayside a bit when everybody lost their jobs, but it is starting to come back now. You do find maybe local bands, the room is half full, but bands like Architects will come and they’ll play in the bigger venues and they’ll sell it out. It’s a little disheartening but it’s kind of just the way it is.

Claire: Yeah, you kind of just have to fight through it. There are bands playing gigs, and there are good bands playing gigs and its getting more and more people starting bands and taking it seriously. I think it will get better, it’s just people don’t have the money to go to gigs all the time.

Dan: In fairness to the promoters in Dublin who are bringing all these bigger bands in, unless it is a package tour, they will always make a spot for a local band, which is great. And once you get in there, if you do a good job, you’ll get another one, so it’s kind of up to the band at that point. And that leads to other things – you know you could be playing one place, and someone will come up to you and say, ‘Oh yeah! I saw you playing with Architects last week’, so it does have that effect as well.

Danny: Yeah – the quality of bands is really, really good. There’s no shortage of talent. There are those odd nights where a bar might only be half full, but it’s not all the time. Overall, it’s pretty good.

Rick: So, I wanted to bring up this video you did, with the Jonestown connection. I was ten when that actually happened and there is a lot of similarities to the actual events in the video, and I wondered who came up with the concept and everything?

Dan: It was the directors of the video. We wrote the song and originally it was just meant to be a demo, and we were listening to it one day and we were like ‘with a little bit more work this could be a fucking good single’, just because it had been a while since people had had any new music. And that then escalated and we decided that if we were going to do it, we may as well do it properly and do a music video for it! We found the guys at Crooked Gentlemen and we gave them the song and they came up with the idea for the video to the music – so it was kind of like art inspiring art in a way.

What did you think when they came up with it?

Dan: We kind of just like rolled with it!

Danny: Yeah, we saw the other stuff they were doing, and it was class, so we just said go for it, and just went all in.

Claire: we didn’t even realise how much detail they were going to go in to! All we were told was there was going to be a performance day – a day where we needed to get some family into a room, so we just said, ‘come for a few hours and sit in this room’. Then we get there, and they had this unbelievable actor, and we were there for the whole day and they had them doing exorcisms and all this mad stuff, but everyone enjoyed it!

Dan: There were parts of it when they were doing stuff and we were standing back, like the bit where they drink the poison, and we were like ‘What the Fuck?!!!’ We had no idea that was happening! It was awesome!!!

Rick: Yeah it is an awesome video!

Claire: The guys that did it, they are actually becoming so big now – like in a couple of months’ time I don’t think you will be able to get them cos they are in such high demand. So, they deserve all the credit really, we just wrote the song.

Rick: Yeah but if they hadn’t had the song, they wouldn’t have come up with the idea!

Danny: Yeah in fairness they were really stoked when they heard the song and they put all their effort into it.

And that was were we had to leave it, as the band had to be whisked away to do another interview. It was great chatting with them and hearing their ideas on things. We could quite happily have carried on for ages. We would really like to thank Claire, Dan and Danny for taking time out of their schedule, on a very cold day, to sit and chat with us for so long. Make sure you check them out and have a watch if you are at Amplified Festival in July, or Bloodstock in August. We will, as ever, keep you posted when they announce the release of their new album, which we will be very much looking forward to. In the meantime, for more info, or to watch the awesome video for their single, ‘Pure Chaos’, check out the links below:

LINKS:

OTHER LINKS:

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Richard Tilley, Beth Jones and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities

Interview with Louis Clarke from Callus

Callus At Hammerfest by Jennie Clarke

Interview with Louis Clarke from Callus

01.04.2018

This weekend, on Easter Sunday to be precise, we here at Ever Metal HQ had the great pleasure of catching up, via Skype, with Louis Clarke, lead singer / guitarist with up and coming Northern Metallers, Callus. We were really excited to speak to him about all things Callus, after being totally blown away by them at Hammerfest X in March. We all settled down with a brew (Louis had a particularly metal mug!!!) and probed Louis on life, the universe and everything (to do with the band that is!) …

So, for people who haven’t heard of Callus, give us a brief history of the band – where did you all meet, and what brought you together?

Well it started in high school. I was in high school and I was a loser, so in my break, I would go and sit in the IT room. I was hanging in there with a few friends, and this kid comes in, he’s called Ben Wormwell, and he sits down at the computer next to me and I say, ‘hey Ben, look at this internet game I am on – it’s called Boobah Zone! So, I showed him that and we were playing that together and he said ‘hey, I like System Of A Down’, and I said ‘yeah I like Metallica’, and we started sharing music and stuff. Then there were many misadventures between then and now!!! We started jamming outside of school, and we enjoyed the same kind of music, so we started writing riffs. A few drummers came and went, but I knew that I wanted to join a serious band. I had been in a band prior – it was like a hard rock band, but it wasn’t serious at all, and I knew I wanted to push it further. So, me and Ben had been jamming for a while, and we named ourselves Callus, and got a gig. That first gig was in Preston in November 2013, and we have been working on it since then. That gig was an absolute disaster!! It was SOO bad!! Like I say, we have had numerous drummers come and go over the years, but Ryan joined us about half a year ago now and we have picked up the material again and it is solid now. Obviously, we have the three people, and there are three separate lives to take into account, you know, everyone has got different things going on, but we have settled with Ryan, and he’s very happy and that makes us very happy.

He is a great drummer.

Thank you – yeah honestly, he floored us when we started jamming – we were like ‘he actually wants to join our band?!’ We couldn’t believe it!! He is very professional, and it doesn’t even stop with his drumming – obviously we are working on the album and he’s got a home studio set up and he is just as good behind the desk as he is behind the drums! He’s just a crazy talented dedicated guy, and he has got a place in Callus now and it is very good!

So where did the name ‘Callus’ come from?

I had a few big sheets of band names, or song name ideas, and a few lyrics, and we were just jamming one time in our bedrooms, and we thought, ‘lets have a look at the names’, and it was Ben who picked it – it was on the sheet of many ideas, and he went down the list and saw it and went ‘We’re calling it Callus! It’s called Callus!’ and I was like ‘Sick! Sounds good!’! We knew that we wanted a one-word name. I think some of the best band names are just one word, you know, it’s clear – Pantera, Metallica, Megadeth – it’s just straight to the point, and I think that is what our music represents. It’s fairly straight to the point – it’s pretty simple stuff really! It’s not majorly complex, so we’re not going to have seven or eight words in our band name.

How about song writing – who takes charge there, or is it more of a whole group thing?

Well, the primary bulk of the material has been from stuff that I have written. Most of the lyrics have been from myself, because I do most of the vocals, but Ben has been doing lyrics on a bunch of songs that are his and writing the songs as well. He comes to me sometimes with an idea and we jam it on acoustics and then it morphs into a live element, you know with amps and electric! He’s coming up with stuff that I don’t even think of! So, it’s me and Ben primarily, but the great thing with Ryan coming in now is he’s actually been writing as well, which is really good. He’s got a quite a different taste of music – obviously he is in to his metal – but he likes a lot of bands that me an Ben aren’t necessarily big fans of, and it is great because he is bringing in another element, and there are going to be a few highlights of that on the album, because the songs are a mix of the songs that we have already got that aren’t committed to studio and some new ones as well!

Do you tend to write the lyrics first then add the music, or does the music come first and you put lyrics to it?

For us it always starts with a riff. We have a catalogue of hundreds of riffs that aren’t committed to songs – just little bits that sound good. Then, we sit down and kind of start linking the riffs together, and we build a song that way, musically, first. Then lyrics always come last in our process. A lot of it is working of syllables – how the riff and the rhythm feel, because we’re not the most complex song writers – it’s like Sabbath – a lot of the vocals follow the riff, and that’s a dynamic that we really like. They are one of our favourite bands. So yeah – lyrics come last. I do write a lot of the lyrics – Ben’s done a few, and I have written a few for Ben to perform – like the last song we did at Hammerfest was called ‘The Root Of All Evil’, and I wrote the lyrics to that but Ben’s got such a rough gnarly voice, I was just like ‘Ben, you’ve got to sing it!’ It suits his voice!

Where do you get your inspiration for lyrics?

I do a lot of reading. I like a lot of Stephen King, but I love old literature – H G Wells and stuff – anything really imaginative. So, it is a combination of stuff like that, just for that mentality and way of thinking, quite outside the box stuff. But then it is primarily life experience and all from deep within my mind!! From some deep dark recess under the hat!! Yeah so, a combination of life experiences – stuff that maybe Ben has told me that has upset him or made him happy – but it is quite open to interpretation though. One thing we want to do is get the lyrics printed for the album and we want people to read the lyrics and interpret it themselves. I would never go to someone and say, ‘this Callus song is about this!’ – We don’t want to be like that at all I have my own interpretation, but we want people to apply their own life experience to it. I think it is open to interpretation in that way. We are doing it from the heart and hopefully that resonates with people who listen to it, and it makes a connection with them and they get something out of it too.

So, the first time you popped onto our radar was, indeed, at Hammerfest X earlier this month. Was this your breakthrough gig?

I think so yes. As I said, we have been plugging away at it for a good few years now, but Hammerfest was next level! I definitely think that was our big shot. It’s just a case now of sticking at it and hoping to get more slots like that and play in different places, and the same place (!) and just keep trucking on.

We, I think, echoed everyone else in the room in thinking ‘wow, these guys are great’. How did you find the reception there?

We were astounded! We felt good about it anyway. Naturally there were some nerves because it was a big gig. But I think the likes of yourselves being there, and the general reception we got; we were blown away by it! And we are still in awe of it because everyone was so great about it and everyone seemed to enjoy it – we haven’t heard anything bad about it. We had people coming up to us around the festival saying, ‘argh we really enjoyed it’ and that was fantastic, just to see people so happy – it made our weekend! It made our career!! So far!

When we watched you perform at Hammerfest, one thing that we noticed was how tight you were together and, considering there are only three of you in the band, how much stage presence you had – you seemed to fill the stage. Has it been difficult, with the number of drummers going through, to get that tightness?

Yeah with drummers coming and going over the years, that’s been very detrimental to the progress of the band. In the past it has been like one step forward, two steps back, which has been really unfortunate. But, me and Ben are resolute in the knowledge that we are going to be doing this for years, and luckily we have found a third guy now who has the same vision as us, so now it is three guys going forwards, and I think that is why it has come up to the next level, because finally we have reached that point where we’re all on the same page, we all want the same thing, and we’re all going for it together. It comes in to what we said before about Ryan – he is a very skilled player and he just boosted us. It has been inspiring to play with him.

Have you ever toyed with the idea of adding any more members, or are you just happy with three?

We are happy with three at the moment, but all I would say is that we are never going to be set in our ways, you know, we’re open to any ideas. If ever the three of us thought, ‘Yes, we want to bring an extra element in to the band’, then we would do that, because its our band! And I think we are free to do that! There won’t be any didgeridoo players or bagpipes or anything like that though!!

Now, you have a couple of big gigs coming up in the next week – the ‘Metal 2 The Masses’ semi-final and ‘Mammothfest: The Best Band’ before that – are you nervous about those and what they could lead to? (CHECK OUT THE EVENT LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE INTERVIEW)

We naturally get nervous when there a fair few people turn up, like anyone else – it can be like ‘woah there’s a fair crowd here tonight!!’, but we enjoy what we do so much and we are just excited for them – any opportunity, whether it be in the big festivals like Hammerfest, or Metal 2 The Masses in Carlisle – cos that’s at ‘Club Rock’ and we’ve never played there before so it is a new adventure, and we know the majority of the bands that are already on it, so it’s a good night in itself and that is always the aim for us. We want each individual night to be the best it can be all the time. Obviously Metal 2 The Masses and the Mammothfest one gives us the potential of playing these big festivals, which would be amazing, but for us we focus on the gig at hand, and then we move on to the next gig and see what comes our way and push for what we can. So, yeah, a little bit of nerves because it is the semi final for Metal 2 The Masses, but we are looking forward to it – we are going to get in there and do our thing, as we always do!

So, you have mentioned the album a couple of times – when’s it coming out?!

Well, we’ve done all the guide tracks! So, we’ve got all the material recorded in demo format, so it is just a case now of getting in and doing all the final instruments and stuff, which is going to take a while, because we are busy people outside of band, but we are hoping for a release towards the end of this year. We have had one or two labels who have potentially been interested, so it might be January. But, it will be ready when it’s ready. We want to take our time so that it is ready – we’re not going to rush anything. We want it to be proper so that we can stand by it, because it is our debut full length release and we want to be able to stand by it until the end of time and that is the goal! But we have got a name for it and the art work for it! So, we’re getting there! Progress is happening!!

Excellent! Can’t wait to hear it! Looking forward, what is your ‘next step’ career goal with the band – where do you want to take it to now?

Well we have talked about touring for a while now. I think we are trying to get something together for the end of the year. Sort of like a bit of a mini tour – try and get up and down the country a bit – that would be nice. I think that the next step for us is really getting out on the road and doing that, because we do gigs everywhere we can – we kind of have them dotted around and stuff, so we would like to push it a bit more. There is that and obviously the album. Once that is released, if we do a tour, we want to be really pushing that. We want to support that as much as we can and get it out there. So yeah – more things, bigger and better things, and just more gigs in general I think, and more releases!

The ultimate goal I supposed is to make this your career rather than anything else your career isn’t it!

Yeah of course!

To wrap up our chat today, we would like to ask you a question, that whilst unrelated to metal, is a question that we always like to ask, and is very important – Jaffa Cake – cake or biscuit?!

It is 100% a cake definitely! The clue is in the name! No basically I think a biscuit is hard, or it has to have a certain amount of crunch to it, but a Jaffa Cake is soft, it’s squidgy, you know – like a cake! So that is what I would say!!

It was our absolute pleasure to chat to Louis today, and we are very grateful that he took time out of his schedule to answer our questions. These guys are three really genuinely great guys with a superb passion and drive that will take them a long way. We are going to be eagerly awaiting the album and highly recommend that you all check them out too. To make that a little easier, all the links you need are below – happy listening folks!

MAMMOTHFEST: THE BEST BAND HEAT 4, APRIL 5th LIVE ROOMS, CHESTER

https://www.facebook.com/events/1168157936649441/

METAL 2 THE MASSES SEMI-FINAL2, APRIL 7th CLUB ROCK, CARLISLE

https://www.facebook.com/events/686866531704126/

BAND LINKS:

https://www.facebook.com/Callus.band/

https://callus117.bandcamp.com/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZOSaYdZBmL8DhLMPjLWggQ?pbjreload=10

https://www.instagram.com/callus_uk/

BAND PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIE CLARKE

https://www.facebook.com/Jennie-Clarke-Photography-404649823289763/

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Richard Tilley, Beth Jones and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities

Interview with Riot V

I have been a fan of Riot ever since I first heard Flight of the Warrior a few years ago and getting the chance to interview them was a dream come true for me. The band have had some ups and downs over years but have come through it fighting. Here I talk to them about some of those tumultuous years.

 

Hi, I’m Dawn King from Ever Metal. I would like to thank you for taking the time to talk to us and I hope you are all well?

Thank you for the opportunity to do this interview.  We are doing well. We have been busy writing and recording our new album, so we have not played out live as much this year as we did the last couple of years. 2018 should be a great year for us and keep us busy!

Ok, being the huge Riot fan that I am this is a bit of a dream for me, but, for those who have been hiding in a remote cave for the past forty years, can you give us a quick background of the band?

Bursting out of New York City with three ground-breaking albums in quick succession ‘ROCK CITY’ (Capitol), ‘NARITA’ (Capitol) and ‘FIRE DOWN UNDER’ (Elektra), RIOT quickly became one of the biggest metal bands in the world. Stunning performances in the UK at Castle Donington and Wacken Festivals and support slots with Black Sabbath, AC/DC, Rush, Kiss to name and few cemented their reputation as the hottest ticket to see.

With the Eighties developing into a metal-fest, a new-look new-sound RIOT bounced back transforming from an edgy hard rock band into a power metal assault and released the widely-acclaimed release ‘THUNDERSTEEL’ (Sony) and RIOT was reborn! ‘THUNDERSTEEL was followed by with the jaw-dropping conceptual album ‘THE PRIVILEGE OF POWER’ (Sony) featuring an elite list of guest performers (Rainbow’s Joe Lynn Turner, Tower of Power horns and Saturday Night Live band leader G.E Smith).

RIOT’s classic ‘Thundersteel’ line-up reformed for a limited reunion in 2009 and delivered another ground breaking disc ‘IMMORTAL SOUL’. Released by major metal heavy weights Spv/ Steamhammer & Avalon/ Marquee, and a successful Tour with performances on the prestigious Royal Caribbean 70,000 Tons of Metal oceanliner concert and appearances at Sweden Rock and Metalway festivals solidified RIOT’s long sought after return a success, but success doesnt come without tragedy. RIOT‘s journey has never been easy, with personal changes and the untimely deaths of frontmen Guy Speranza, Rhett Forrester as well as the passing of long time guitarist Mark Reale who finally lost his life long battle with Crohns disease in 2012.

Through the storm of life’s obsticles the guys successfully continue to raise the flag in honor of the RIOT legacy of music, fallen band mates and the fans who have been demanding RIOT for years. This new onslaught released the highly acclaimed comeback record “Unleash the Fire” which entered the Hard Rock 100 Billboard charts at 75 and Rolling Stone Magazine gives it a 4 out of 5 and most media including Burrn! Rock Hard and Aardshock calling it album of the year! This new line up Riot V consisting of original long time members Donnie Van Stavern and Mike Flyntz joined by amazing newcomers Todd Michael Hall, Frank Gilchriest and Nick Lee headlined sold out shows in Germany, Greece, Spain and Italy and rocked the prestigious festivals Sweden Rock Festival (Sweden), Rock Fest Barcelona (Spain), Loud Park (Japan), Keep It True, Metal Assault, Headbangers Open Air (Germany), Fall of Summer (Paris), Metal Apocalypse, Bang Your Head with Twisted Sister/ Anthrax, Metal Days with Megadeth/ Volbeat, two appearances onboard 70,000 Tons of Metal Cruiseship Festival and top it off with appearences with with Judas Priest, Motley Crue and Def Leppard, Journey to name a few!

With reissues on Sony, EMI & Metal Blade, RIOT are consistantly on radio and metal charts worldwide, as well as being a part of New York Citys Top 20 Most Influencial Metal Bands, 100 Best Metal Albums of All Time, 100 Best Metal Bands of All Time and numerous mentions on VH1’s That Metal Show with Eddie Trunk and staff sighting RIOT as one of the inovaters of Metal music in America and beyond! Whew! 

I have heard you being described as one of the unluckiest bands in heavy metal! How would you react to this?

It depends on your perspective. There are many bands that make no mark at all and Riot has been fortunate enough to influence other musicians and reach many people around the world throughout a very long career. Although, I understand the question, because even though Riot has had successful albums, the band never really broke big enough to turn their success into a lot of money for Mark Reale or the others involved. There have also been unfortunate events that made things more difficult, like original lead singer Guy Speranza leaving the band after their 3rd successful album or management difficulties, etc.

There have been numerous changes in personnel over the years including the untimely deaths of vocalists Guy Speranza and Rhett Forrester, and also that of founding member guitarist Mark Reale. How have you had to adapt as a band as a result of these changes?

Throughout his time with the band, founding guitar player Mark Reale, dealt with a lot of line up changes. He maintained a collaborative environment, so the bands sound evolved over time depending on the members involved. That is a big reason why there was a shift in the bands sound from a more hard rock sounding heavy metal to a power metal sound on Thundersteel (1988) when bassist Donnie Van Stavern start contributing his song writing talents.

Mark’s passing in 2012 was a big blow to the band, but Donnie worked with Mark as early as 1984 and current guitarist, Mike Flyntz, has been in the band since 1989, so each brings something new to the band, but also have long enough history with the band to be true to the original music.

Obviously the passing of Mark must have been very hard for you, on a personal and professional level. How did you find the strength to regroup and make the comeback you did?

(Donnie) It took me awhile to decide to come back. Before Mark’s untimely passing he stayed with me and we would write music and discuss the future of the band. There was also talk of carrying on as he new he was sick. Mike actually played most the guitar on Immortal Soul, because Mark was to sick to play. Through a lot of soul searching, chats with his father Tony, and Tony’s comment of “Don’t let the music die with my son” we decided to forge ahead. I started managing the band at that time and contacted the labels and agents and everyone was supportive and still onboard. It helped us heal and kept the spirit alive for him and the fans

I read it was at the request of Mark’s family that you laid the name “RIOT” to rest. How has this affected your popularity and reputation as a band? And have there been any legal issues with this name change?

Tony Reale, Mark’s father, wanted his son’s music to live on, so he is very supportive of the band continuing. He didn’t want the name retired so much as he just wanted something to signify the change. Donnie and Mike wanted to do something as well, as a sign of respect for Mark. The Roman numeral V was added to signify this as the firth era of Riot, since Todd is the fifth singer. There are no legal issues because Tony owns the name and passed it along to us, so we actually own it now.

The album “Unleash The Fire” which you released in 2014 was the first without Mark. How did that make you feel individually and as a band?

(Donnie) We knew we had to make an incredible record after Mark’s passing, so my mindset was to create an album with Fire Down Under and Thundersteel style combined. Mark taught me a lot about Riot style of writing, so basically I just followed his advice and created what I think he would call a great Riot album and be proud of.

Your sound has changed over the years. Are you happy with the direction the band is going in now?

(Donnie) Riot incorporated a lot of different styles. Guy era was edgier metal/ rock, Rhett era was kind of southern hard rock, Tony was metal and DiMeo was a more Rainbow-like bluesy style. When I decided to continue, I went with my era and style – riffy Power metal with an upper register singer and continued to write in that vein. Todd Michael Hall fit right in and saw the vision.

So 2017 saw the re-release of Inishmore/Shine On and Sons of Society. Why did you decide to re-release these particular albums?

(Donnie) Metal Blade records approached us about the reissues as they do quite a few, so we thought it would be a good idea to release these for the oldsters and maybe some that haven’t heard these. These titles were contractually free and clear and the money goes to Mark’s estate, so it helps his father Tony out as well

Are there plans for any new material to be released?

We are currently writing and recording our new album and hope to have it released shortly after the start of 2018. We recently switched labels so the release got pushed back a bit.

What about a tour? I have seen you have some festival appearances this year, is there any chance you will be coming to british soil? Bloodstock next year maybe??

We are definitely looking to book more shows to support the new album, so we hope to play shows in the UK during 2018. We have Belgium and Spain and a small tour towards the end of 2017. We have talked to Bloodstock and others. We are confirmed for Loud Park, Rock Fest Barcelona, Sweden Rock, Headbangers Open Air (Headline), and yes we will finally return to the UK!

Speaking of festivals, which is your favourite festival to play and why?

It is difficult to pick a favorite, because they are all special for different reasons. The Keep It True Festival in Germany is one that sticks out, because they limit the size and it is always packed. Rockfest Barcelona was great time too and Loud Park in Japan has been a great show for us as well. There are too many to name.

There has been talk of heavy metal dying. What are your views on this? Do you think it will ever die out completely?

There was a time when heavy metal was very huge in the USA and I think the fickle nature of popular culture will prevent that from happening again or at least not for a long time. However, there are still a lot of heavy metal fans around the world, despite the fact that the music world now consists of so many different little niches. I am quite sure some version of heavy metal will always be around.

The rock and roll lifestyle and heavy metal kind of go hand in hand but what I would like to know is…..what’s it gonna take to make you guys riot?

A great 2018, electricity, a flight to your location, a bottle of tequila and thousands of screaming fans Rioting!!

Well, thank you for your time. Is there anything else you would like to add?

(Donnie) Just announced, RIOT will be inducted into the prestigious Heavy Metal History Hall of Fame 2018! Past inductee’s include Scorpions, Randy Rhoads, Lemmy, Slayer and others!

Soooo THANK YOU and all the amazing fans that have supported us and stuck with us throughout the long years because we wouldn’t be here without you! We will see you soon!

Shine On!

 

Thank You

Dawn

 

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Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Dawn “The Metal Priestess” King and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities

Interview with Mason Hill

Mason Hill Pic1

Mason Hill Interview – End of 2017

By Beth Jones

Those of you who have read my previous reviews will have guessed that I quite like Mason Hill!! So, it was my immense pleasure to be able to do an interview with them recently, and although finding time to do a face to face proved pretty much impossible, the guys were more than happy to answer my questions via the medium of email, with Matthew Ward, their Bass player and face puller extraordinaire, being the group spokesman – and here are the results.

Your performance at Rockwich absolutely blew me away in a way that no band has in a long time! I was instantly a fan. For the people that haven’t yet heard about you, tell us all about who you are and what you do?

Thanks a lot! We really enjoyed that show. For anyone that hasn’t heard of us we are a hard rock band based in Glasgow. We have been touring/gigging in our current line-up since February of 2016, but some of the songs have been played live for a few years before that. James and Scott started writing together when they were still in high school, but I would say once the line-up was completed and the EP was released is when we really hit the ground running and started to aim bigger! The best way to hear us (or any band for that matter) is on the live stage; we work really hard to bring the most exciting show we can to any crowd we play for.

You have a very classic American Rock sound – Who are your main influences? Who inspired you most to get up and say, ‘That is what I want to do!’?

The main influences are different for every member. That “Mason Hill sound” starts with the riff master, James, who seems to listen to everything. Obviously a lot of classic rock shapes the sound, but we try and bring a modern sound to all of the tracks as well. We are all big fans of Alter Bridge and Black Stone Cherry etc, but our average travel playlist ranges anywhere between Metallica and Bruno Mars (maybe shouldn’t admit that one!) depending who is controlling the songs. As for who inspired me to want to get up on stage, it would have to be watching Flea from The Red Hot Chilli Peppers. After watching him play at 12 years old, I knew I wanted to pick up the bass and play in a band.

You came down to Welsh Wales in December, to Porthcawl, and to the awesome Tivoli venue, Buckley, which we were at – was this your first trip to Wales?

We will be down in Wales a few times in the coming months. It won’t be our first time; we played last year at Hard Rock Hell after winning the Highway to Hell competition. We opened up the main stage on Friday to a near full room. That show was one of the highlights of last year’s shows so we are really excited to get back to Wales and party with the crazy Welsh fans again.

Your gig in Porthcawl was at Planet Rockstock – how much were you looking forward to sharing the stage with the likes of Bernie Marsden, Joanne Shaw Taylor and Thunder?!

The line-up to this year’s festival was amazing, it’s always a pleasure to share a bill with artists you’ve grown up admiring and being influenced by. The great thing about these festivals is the fact they are letting the new kids on the block like ourselves on the bill and show people, the fans, what we have to offer.

You had a series of gigs in the lead up to Christmas – was this a build up to the release of your first album? Do you have a release date yet for that?

The tour was just an end of year run in celebration of the release of the first video, and to end the year on a high with some great shows. The album is on its way! We promise! Everyone’s demoing their respective parts. There are lots of really cool things happening in the background on the lead up that will make the wait for the debut worth it. We should have it out in either the second or third quarter of next year we hope.

I think you will be huge – Where would you like to see yourselves in five years?

In 5 years’ time we all really hope to be doing this on a full time and international scale. The growth of the band over the past year has been great, so we are all working towards the same goal of bringing the best quality music we can to our fans and really stretching further afield.

The ever-growing festival circuit is already shaping up to be great next year – are you on the bill for any yet?

The answer, there is… there is no answer. We have lots planned for next year, the album is the main priority, but we will certainly take some time out for shows and festivals. Nothing we can announce at the moment. But keep your eyes peeled. (NB Since we did this interview, Mason Hill have been announced for the main stage at Amplified festival in July – a fact about which I am majorly stoked! Beth)

You all have an awesome stage presence, and that for me is what makes you stand out from the crowd, but who is in charge?! Who is the ‘dad’ of the group – the one who makes sure everyone has their stuff, and tells everyone where to stand, etc!?

Me!! I am the boss of everyone…(not true) The live show is quite a spontaneous thing. There’s no one telling us where to move etc, we just have a great on stage chemistry. Off stage the most organised person has to be James! Unless he has had a few to many shandies!!!

You are signed to Frontiers – an amazing label to be with for such a young band – how did that come about?

Our management ‘Shock City’ proposed the idea to us initially. Our plans were for a second EP. But our management were confident we had the tracks to shop us to Frontiers. It worked, so I guess they were right! They are a great label with great bands on the roster, so it’s a privilege to work with them.

If you could be main support for any band in the world right now, who would that be?

I think in terms of an ideal pairing of bands , it would be the likes of Black Stone Cherry or Shinedown. In terms of dream band to support, for me it would be a band like Iron Maiden or Kiss, just so I could watch Eddie fighting the band from backstage every night.

What has been your favourite, or most memorable gig to date?

To date it has to the headline show in August at the Glasgow Garage. We have played some amazing shows this year like the Boardie Takeover at Download, but there is always something special about playing a venue in your hometown and getting that kind of response.

Do you have a wish list of venues you would love to play?

One of my Bucket list venues is actually on this tour. We play Glasgow Barrowlands, which I have wanted to play since I saw my first show there when I was 13. That will be a special night for sure. Having said that, I would not turn down a show in Madison Square Garden or Wembley Stadium either!

Is music now your full-time job, or are you all still gainfully employed in other professions?

I wouldn’t use the word gainfully to describe my employment, but yes music is the main priority but other work pays the bills. We aim to remedy that over the next couple of years however.

What’s worse – Fangirls or Facebook trolls?!

I’ll let you know when I have some fan girls!! Applications are open!!

And finally, completely unrelated to music, but none the less a valid and well debated argument – The Jaffa Cake – cake or biscuit?!

A question that has haunted Britain for some time. But it’s a cake. It’s in the name. Biscuits crunch Jaffa cakes do not. End of argument.

Once again, I would like to say a huge thanks to Matt, and all the Mason Hill boys, for taking the time to provide me with the answers to my questions, although you are wrong on the Jaffa cake front, but I will let that go, seeing as I would also like to apply for the position of Mason Hill Fan girl #1 – I feel I have all the correct qualities for the position in equal measures!

I for one really can’t wait to see more of these guys as often as possible. Check them out anywhere you can. Here are some useful links for you to get you started:

SOCIAL MEDIA

 

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Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Beth Jones and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities

Baleful Creed interview

John Allen / Fin Finlay – Baleful Creed Interview

October 2017

by Beth Jones

About a month ago (I’m slow, I know – hey I’ve been busy!) I had the great pleasure of interviewing John and Fin, the guitarist and front man and founding members of Northern Ireland heavy rockers Baleful Creed. We had a very jolly 40 minutes on Skype, covering everything from Buckfast to Jaffa Cakes. So here it is:

Baleful Creed band pic

Ever Metal: For those who haven’t heard of you, can you give us a brief history of the band. Where you came from, what you do and where you are now?

John Allen: Well it started back in 2009. Previously Fin and me had just been dabbling about with a covers band, nothing too serious, it was just a way to get out of the house, crank up the volume on the amps and the guitars and just sort of have a night out! We only did a few gigs as the cover band – probably because we weren’t very good!!

Fin Finlay: No, I think it was probably because we picked songs that we enjoyed playing, not what the public wanted!

John: Yeah, we didn’t do songs like ‘Summer Of 69’ or anything like that!

Fin: We didn’t do the stuff that people wanted to hear – so the covers band was like playing an original set – people going ‘we’ve never heard of any of this!’

John: Yeah, then just at some point, Fin came to me with this disc of four or five demo songs that he had put together. I was fairly reticent of actually listening to it because I didn’t want to! When did he write a song? You know! But he totally surprised me and that ‘first material’ morphed into what became the debut EP. That hooked straight away on his style of writing. I think I had the guitar tone he wanted so we put that together. Plus, I had the band name as well!

Fin: Yeah you had that from a long time ago!

John: He had to get me on board I think! From that, that pushed me into starting to write stuff so it then developed into what we are and who we are now.

Who were your biggest musical influences growing up?

Fin: I can answer his – Black Sabbath!! I have a really wide range of music I like – from heavy metal to… When I was about 8 or 9 my cousin gave me some LPs – Black Sabbath, AC/DC, Judas Priest – stuff like that, and ever since then I’ve just always liked rock. It wasn’t like ‘Oh I was in to rock last summer and I’m into hip hop this summer’, once you go into rock, it’s in your blood. It’s not a phase. It’s a love.

John: Queen was the first band that got me in to listening to rock. I was watching Top Of The Pops going ‘this is absolute rubbish this stuff’, I had no interest in music at all, but I always sort of knew about Queen, and then when I got my first pay packet, I was thinking about buying an album and it was Queen and it started me down that road.

Fin: Yeah, it was the 80s – people always go on about the 80s and 80s music, and it was horrible! And the style was terrible as well!! I was just jeans, leather jacket and cut offs. I didn’t mind that look, but I didn’t like that whole new romantic thing.

John: Yeah that style of music is probably best just left in the past!!

You have recently released your second album “Seismic Shifter” how is that being received so far?

John: Yeah it went down really well – it’s been a real pleasant surprise for us! We were so shocked to get a first album out! Then to carry on and move in to a second album – at the end of the day this was all started as just a hobby and a bit of fun – but it’s just escalated – like a small snowball rolling down a hill and growing in size and volume as the years go on. So, it was great to get another album out – it was something we probably both thought we would never do again. It was great that we weren’t the one album only and that was it done. It’s great that we have achieved another batch of songs that we could go out and record. And the reception for it has been phenomenal. It’s been out since June and the reviews have all been pretty incredible so we’re exceedingly chuffed with that. It’s been good putting it all together for the last three years or so.

Fin: We had to do that with the new guys coming on board – the two Daves – we had to give them time – they wanted to get out and gig, so they had to learn the first album, then they wanted to gig it, so it took a while before we could actually get writing again. John had a lot of riffs from ages ago anyway, so when we did decide to write another album it was good because the Daves’ influences helped as well.

John: Absolutely, and a lot of people have said there is a definite change – it’s still the Baleful Creed core sound to it, but definitely the grooves have changed and that’s got to be down to the new engine room that’s in place! People are noticing that live and certainly on the record that there’s a wee different set of influences in there, that have just changed the way the final product is and luckily, it’s all been really positive and favourable, so we’re exceedingly chuffed with that.

We have actually commented on that – it definitely does sound different – your live sound appears heavier to your album sound – do you prefer the measured experience of studio recording for an album, or do you prefer the rough and ready of live performance – the heavier, the chunkier, the ‘we can whack it up as much as we want here’?

Fin: Yeah, playing live is really good. That’s what we want to do all the time, but you do have to do new material for the fans and the people listening. You go into the studio and it’s all excitement you know, but it does get a bit tedious after a while! You’re just sitting there waiting and either John or Dave’s laying down bass lines or riffs or something, and its only more fun when you’re doing it yourself!

John: Ey, the studio’s a strange place to be in! For me it’s exceedingly nerve wracking – when you’re playing and everybody’s looking at you and you’re on ‘take 55 of this wee bit’!! Like OCD to get that solo right. Whereas live, you’ve got to get out there, you play it, there’s no room for error. You make wee blips here and there and whatnot, but its raw – you’re feeding off what’s happening in the audience, you’re feeding off the other players in the band, you’re basically feeding off the volume cos you can get out there and get that amp cranked up.

Fin: I would actually love to be out in the crowd to hear that sound because on the stage you don’t hear that sound – you get the monitors, and you hear a bit of volume from your amps, but you don’t hear the overall sound. Some people say, ‘WOW that was really, really loud, I loved it!!’ I’d love to be out there just to hear it!

John: Yeah you can still hear a bit of what is actually going on. Obviously, the studio captures that, but the studio is always going to be quite restrained in a way, where every note needs to be just caught and put down on tape. You’re working to click tracks or whatever, so it’s all quite precise and polished. Going out live, you get that……. You know we’re just a live band at the end of the day, so it does flip over a bit. Certainly nothing changes tuning wise, it’s maybe just the volume that we operate at!

Fin: Eleven!!!

John: Mr Jeffers is a loud drummer so yes, our amps go to eleven in good old Spinal Tap world!

What is the rock and metal scene like in Ireland?

Fin: It’s ok…….!! It’s very good actually. There’s so much talent over here. The only thing is, it’s a small country so everyone’s fighting for a place. We do want to break over and get on to the mainland more because, if you just want to stay in the one wee country, you just do nothing! You can’t get out to a wider audience.

John: It’s very easy to over saturate yourself here. You’re playing to a limited audience. There is a very good hardcore of folk who will come out and support the local music and the local scene here. When you go to a big gig – and our biggest would be the SSE Odyssey which holds 8-10,000, those mainstream rock bands, metal bands crowds don’t filter down into the local scene really, and there are a lot of really good bands and really good albums that are just floating about here in Northern Ireland, because people just don’t seem to want to go out and see what’s on their doorstep. I was like that in my early twenties – all I went to see was cover bands and the big bands that came through – my night out was going out to see what band was playing AC/DC and things like that. Then I discovered a couple of local bands I sort of went ‘Hang on – there is stuff happening on my doorstep that is really good’! I think you just need to be introduced to that, then you actually just start delving in. A lot of people – us included only ever went to big gigs, and then Darren heard Citizens. I think they were supporting Blaze Bayley or someone like that and they just totally blew him away and he was like ‘What the hell’s going on here – they’re from here!!’ And he then started delving in. He set up a local festival, because his son had been really ill in childhood and it was a way of saying thank you to the hospital that had treated him. He put on all the best local talent. It was probably the most successful festival round here and that was from him just seeing one local band and thinking ‘Bloody hell there’s something good going on here on my doorstep!’

Fin: Yeah, his festival would be one of the biggest gigs over here – everyone wants to be part of it – it’s always a really good, big crowd and it’s very successful.

JA: Yeah – apart from that though, nothing like Rockwich, that you were both at, happens over here and for me it’s a big gap in the market. You get your evening gig where there’ll be three or four rock and metal bands on, but we really only have Sunflower Fest here.

FF: But that’s more main stream isn’t it.

John: It’s a bit more eclectic – its indie, its world music and stuff like that – you only get a wee bit of rock and metal coming through. So, there’s a market here for a one dayer, maybe two – day Rock and Metal festival. There’s a wealth of bands here. And there a quite a few Northern Ireland bands punching through onto the mainland, so I think for a wee small country we’re doing alright!

Is it difficult attracting exposure in England, Scotland and Wales? How easy is it for you getting over here to the mainland to play?

John: Well we have been over about three or four times, but it was all Scotland based gigs before. Our first English gig was Rockwich a few months ago. This fella here (Fin) doesn’t fly, so it’s big money heading over with him cos we’ve got to take a ferry and a car!! But we’ve reached the point now where we know we need to get over now and we’ll invest that money just to get over and get reaching the audience. Online you can do so much as well now, you know, you can reach out to people and let them hear the band.

Fin: Yeah years ago it used to be flyers – you used to have to put flyers up or pass them around and just hope that they got to the people who wanted to come and see you! But there wasn’t a big original band scene here in the early nineties – there was a lot of cover bands and stuff.

John: Maybe then it was just we hadn’t discovered that there was all these original bands ourselves – we might have been off radar!! Whereas now we’re more clued in to what’s happening. Certainly, our focus is to listen to our contemporary bands round here.

Who is the song writer, or do you all have a hand in it?

John: It’s a mixture of all of us really.

Fin: We like to write music that we want to listen too.

John: Mostly the second album came about because of somebody bringing riffs into the room – whether that was stuff that Fin had, or myself, you sort of jam it out in the room a bit, then the Daves bring in their influence – they sort of pull and push it whatever way it needs to go, then the vocals will come in on top. This time round everybody was putting their eggs into the mix, whereas before it would have mostly been Fin. We’re all quite open. He will get an idea and tweak it to his own sort of style cos he knows how many syllables he needs to sing in a particular line, so where we might have written a novel, he’ll tone it down to a singable level but keep the gist of what the song is about. So it just goes into a big mixing pot really and gets shoved around until we get an end product that we are all pretty happy with.

Baleful Creed Seismic Shifter Cover

What’s next for Baleful Creed? Are you writing still or are you just concentrating on the live stuff?

John: Well, we are heading into a quiet period gig wise, so this will open up the chance for us to get back in writing again. We do only get to meet once a week anyway on an evening because of work commitments and family commitments, so we do only get a couple of hours a week to get into the room and start mixing stuff up. But a goal has been set to try and get a third album out within a couple of years.

Fin: But hopefully make it a wee bit different again.

Thinking forward to that album, and the future; If you could work with one producer in the future, who would that be, or would you self-produce?

Fin: We like producing it ourselves!

John: We’re fairly fortunate that Neil up at Manor Park (Neil Calderwood – Manor Park Studios) knows our sound, and knows the sound that we like, and captures it really well for us. I think that comes through in the reviews that we have got off the album. For me it would be Martin Birch, if he’s still alive, because he is Rainbow, he is Heaven and Hell, he’s all those classic Iron Maiden albums. I’d like to work with Martin Birch.

Fin: I’ll go with what he says!!

John: You can’t do that – you’re more Bob Rock!(Laughing)

If you could do a world tour, what countries would you like to gig in?

John: Errrrr….. All the countries that are connected by land so he doesn’t have to fly!!! I don’t think there are any restrictions really. I would really love to play America – we’ve a lot of good friends and supporters over there – it would be great to just get over and do a gig for them at some point.

Fin: It’s just about financing ourselves, that’s all.

John: Yeah, we run this as an independent thing ourselves, so everything we make is just churned back into the band funds again.

Fin: Yeah nothing goes into our own pockets – it all goes back in for recording, merchandise, it’s like a big wheel that just goes round and round.

John: Yeah and it’s been good fun, and everything we do we can look back on and go, ‘that’s our own achievements’. We’ve never tried to be signed in any way shape or form.

Fin: In this day and age, I don’t think that’s even necessary – I’ve read articles where bands are actually encouraged to market themselves, to do those things themselves and cut out the middle man so to speak. We don’t want to be signed though.

John: Yeah, we have had a couple of approaches in the past and you look at it and think ‘What’s in it for us?’. There’s not a lot of money generated in this industry now, so what we are doing, we want to keep on doing. You invest back into the band and that maybe funds a trip over to the UK or hopefully further afield, hopefully from this new album and getting the merch items out there, but there’s nobody looking over our shoulders going ‘you need to get a record out by such and such a date’, so we can do everything at our own pace with no pressure. At the end of the day this started out as a hobby and it’s maybe not just a hobby any more, but there’s no pressure on us. We’re not going to get into financial difficulties, we’re not going to owe our label money or anything, so we can just do this under our own steam.

Fin: Unless we get a million pound record deal!! That would make us do a record quickly!!

What is your favourite song to play live, and why?

Fin: I Love ‘God’s Fear’, I just love that..

John: Yeah I was just about to say that. ‘Devil’s Side’ for me has a really good feel to it. That, ‘The Wolf’ and ‘Levy’ were the last three to get put together for that new album.

Fin: Yeah and that was nearly dropped!! It’s a wee bluesy feeling, ‘it’s just too simple, it’s maybe not our sort of thing, but we just put it out and it’s become one of people’s favourites…. But for me it would be ‘God’s Fear’.

John: And for me it would be ‘Devil’s Side’ I think.

Fin: I still get a kick out of playing ‘Autumn Leaves’ though. It is the reaction that you get back from the audience – everyone loves it. It’s dark – and I like that.

Give us your best rock’n’roll story – what’s the weirdest thing that has ever happened to you on stage etc?

Fin: For me it would probably be getting completely wasted playing Dublin and making an absolute arse of myself!!

John: Yeah and then you went and re-enacted it again the next time we were in Dublin. You didn’t learn your lesson!!

Fin: Yeah you could get away with that sort of stuff back in the 70s, but not now. I didn’t really think it through.

John: Yeah, the first gig in Dublin wasn’t a good start. I brought my own amp head down, but one of the guys in the other band said, ‘to save yourself bother, just use my rig’, and I blew it in the second song! All the sound just went ffftt. They were playing on, blissfully unaware that I was there, sweat rolling down my face, going ‘WHAT’S GONE ON’!! Trying to find out what the hell had happened! So that was my sheer moment of panic and terror, which I hope to never experience again. Meanwhile, these guys are all stoned and pished out of their heads, because they had taken a road trip to Dublin and I think they had forgotten that they had to play at the end of it! It was a steep learning curve!!

(Note: The band did elaborate further on this, but it may have been incriminating to print it, so we have edited it a little!! Needless to say, after consuming much Buckfast and other concoctions, they were a little worse for wear!)

John: I think that is probably why we have only played Dublin three times and never been invited back!!

Fin: Yeah, I don’t do the whole drinking before a gig thing any more. It’s not enjoyable……. For everyone else there. Maybe for me it is – I thought we were brilliant!!!

John: But it’s a different mindset now. In those early days we were just doing it for fun, but now you know you have got to get up on stage and perform.

Fin: Yeah people want to hear you playing it like the album, they don’t want you to just make stuff up as you’re going along – like Aerosmith – Houston ‘77  – which was woeful!! But the fans didn’t care because they were probably all off their heads as well!!

What would your best advice be for young kids wanting to start a band?

John: Don’t drink before you go on stage!!!!!! Er.. Just enjoy it. Try and get a bit of good equipment because I think that is half the battle – having a good sound before you get up on stage.

Fin: And if you are writing stuff, write stuff that you want to write, not what you think the crowd wants.

John: And don’t mind taking a few hits along the way – you’re not going to please everybody. Some people are going to think you are crap. Don’t take it personally, just get up and try and write another song and see what happens. Just enjoy it for what it is – at the end of the day, you are getting up and you’re playing and if you’re enjoying it, it’s a fantastic hobby / profession to have.

Fin: I would love nothing more than to get up every morning and all I have to do is come up with riffs and lyrics, that would be great. Unfortunately, we have to work!

And finally…Jaffa cake – cake or biscuit?!

Fin: It’s a biscuit.

John: It’s a cake. It’s sponge with chocolate on the top!

Fin: Yeah, but if you go into the supermarket, they are in the biscuit isle!!

John: Yeah, but do you know what the really big clue is? It’s on the box – it says Jaffa CAKE – it doesn’t say Jaffa biscuit!

Fin: What do you guys think?

Beth: Well I’m on the biscuit side!!

Rick: I’m on the cake side!!

Beth: Yeah, we argue about it quite a lot, so we thought we would ask everyone we interview and then collate it!!

John: Cake.

Fin: Nah I’m with Beth, it’s a biscuit all the way. Definitely a biscuit.

And that was that. The band did also tell us that they are working on a website, as not everyone uses social media, and that they are looking to book some gigs here on the mainland very soon. Thank you once again chaps for taking time out of packing merch to talk to us here at Ever Metal! We had great fun. If anyone wants to book the guys, which I would highly recommend, or if you just want to check them out, here are all the links you will need!

BALEFUL CREED ARE –

Fin Finlay – Vocals & Guitar
John Allen – Guitar
Davy Greer – Bass & Vocals
Dave Jeffers – Drums

Links –

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Beth Jones and Ever Metal.  It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the permission of both parties.  Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Robin Beck interview

Robin Beck - love is coming cover

Robin Beck interview, 29/09/17

by Vikkie Richmond

Soft rock supremo Robin Beck knows a thing or two about music and the business in general, having just released her eleventh studio album, “Love Is Coming”.  As a prolific recording artist with a career that has spanned over four decades, she took time out of her busy schedule to share some thoughts on life.

Ever Metal: So, Robin, thank you for taking the time to talk to Ever Metal! Congratulations on studio album number eleven, “Love Is Coming”.  Tell us more about it …

 Robin Beck: Well, it’s the newest album, it’s on Frontiers Records and we’ve changed the dynamic around a little bit.  Normally I write most of the material … my husband James Christian [from House of Lords] co-produced it with Clif Magness, completely did all the tracks and we embellished them.  James played on it and Tommy [Denander] played on it.  I co-wrote a couple of songs, “Crave The Touch” and “Girl Like Me” and we put our own feel on it.  We did this album as three brains, in three different places coming together as one and it was brilliant.

You obviously enjoyed the whole process?

It was the easiest for me as I only had to interpret it, because the songs really mirrored who I am and meant as much to me as my own songs that I’ve been writing over the past couple of years.  It was really easy for me, probably harder for them.

Will you be touring to promote the album?

I am planning a tour, if you gave me something to do right now I wold be jumping out of my skin but you know, with the way the world is shaped right now, it’s a little bit tilted, so we really have to organise ourselves very well so as not to get ourselves jammed up in a situation that we can’t pull out of.  Europe is very unpredictable these days and I do most of my touring over there.  When I do tour over here, lately the weather and the way the world is going, the US is also a bit dodgy.  We’re pushing for spring, we were going to do October, but forces were not with us so we are rearranging. 

Well, we are living in uncertain times.  May I take things back to where you first started – you wrote your first song at around ten years of age, so what drew you into music?  It seems like music is all you ever wanted to do?

That’s the answer right there in the question.  All I ever wanted to do and all I really knew how to do was what came natural to me and I feel very fortunate that it worked out for me on so many different levels.  All of my life I just kept stepping into situations that were real, as opposed to scams; a lot of kids get scammed these days by producers and by ads in magazines, then there is all the rigmarole with YouTube and a lot of – pardon me for saying – very untalented people competing with some very worthy and talented people, so it’s a big, fired-up mess.  I feel really comfortable in saying that, from the era that I draw my inspiration from, with the Beatles, the Supremes, Joe Cocker and Janice Joplin, I had so much to draw from and such a colourful start that it was so much built on fantasy and thinking, I can do this.  Nobody ever tried to stop me and I honestly never had any bad experiences.  It just kept rolling and I kept pursuing and things were just, maybe rightfully or maybe magically, falling in my lap.

It’s a bit of a fairy tale, isn’t it?  You knew what you wanted, you went for it and you got it?

Yeah, it took me thirty two years to make the goal, but … (laughs) I was always in the music business, either in a band or in a studio singing backgrounds, or trying to make a record or performing live, getting into commercials … I was always in the arts in one aspect or another, so I never felt the weight, if you know what I mean.  I always felt like with every little experience, I was getting a break.

Robin Beck pic

Do you feel that these days it’s a bit of a different ethos?  There are a lot of hard workers out there, but there are those that just sit back and think it will happen for them?

Well, I didn’t know how not to put one foot in front of the other to do what I loved doing, it just came very natural.  I don’t know if there’s a lot of people sitting out there waiting for it to come, I don’t know that that’s really the case.  The way YouTube is and Facebook and all of the social media, I think it’s just a great big sensation that there are people that are deserving who don’t get their due and there are people that are really not deserving but somehow or another because of their social media skills, they get a lot more attention and go viral.  I’m not 100% sure that people are sitting there waiting, unless we’re talking about the ‘entitled’ generation, but you know what, every generation goes through their judgement period.  Now we have a world of social media and a lot of technology; this is the generation that maybe feels that they don’t have to beat the pavement the way that we did in the seventies, eighties and the nineties and even just recently, when you’ve come from my roots, we don’t know how to do anything other than put the hammer to the nail.  We may know technology completely and be very versed at it, but it’s not in our blood to fabricate it through social media and to hype it that way as much as it is to create it and provide it and watch it spin out of control and straight onto the charts, if it’s possible.

Do you think that the proliferation of talent and reality shows fuels the fire, when people think it’s going to happen for them just like that?

Oh, there’s a lot of broken hearts.  I’ve seen those crowds and I’ve seen the kids from my daughter, when she was in grade school and high school and all of her friends, they all went to art school and out for those sort of things.  I’ve been to one or two where I’ve watched with friends and even with my own kid and said we’re not sitting through this and we’re not going through this with tens of thousands of people.  I don’t think it’s a bad thing, come on, I mean look what happened for Kelly Clarkson and for Carrie Underwood.  You know, what they say is the cream always rises to the top so no matter what vehicle that you have to take to get there, you have to own it, so if X Factor and American Idol are going to be out there and they’re gonna go through from the clowns to the crowns, then so be it.  If the parents can handle it and the kids really want it – that may be their only way to get from Oklahoma to the stage, it’s not so easy.  It’s a good thing, talent shows are always good – we’ve had them since the beginning of time.        

Do you ever feel jaded by the music business – that you might want to hang up the microphone and not do this anymore?

(Laughs) Of course!  When I had my daughter I was ready to hang up my tap shoes; I only wanted to be her Mom and I had made my greatest achievement; I created another life.  My goal in life is always happiness and health over money and I was never trying to be famous, ever, maybe that’s why I’m not as well-known as I should be worldwide.  It was never my goal, it’s not who I am and I never did it for that reason; I did it because I loved doing it.  Occasionally it does wear your soul down, but the good news is that when inspiration comes knocking, you have someone like Clif Magness who comes [back] into your life after two decades and says, hey do you want to write a song with me or hey, I’ve got songs for you.  It regenerates and the spark is ignited.  If it’s in your blood and it’s real, it would be pretty hard to stop, unless your health stopped you.         

If I may mention THE song (“First Time”, which was used in a Coca Cola advert in 1988) – that was massive for you and you stayed at number one for ages.  How did you feel about the song at the time, because it kind of launched your mainstream career?

It’s absolutely true that it was my breakthrough as a recording artist because I couldn’t have gone as far as I did, I mean as far as I know, because that’s the way it happened, I can’t say it might have happened another way because it didn’t.  Let’s face it, it started out as a commercial and the requests coming into the BBC and Radio 1 were astronomical.  When the request came to me to come and sing it, I came in and I sang it as a job, if you will.  It was like, I did the commercial, I’m thrilled to pieces that it’s doing so well, I’m thrilled that I have an audience because at the time I didn’t know if I would ever get any closer to being an artist than having people appreciate what I did for television commercials and actually recognising me by name was phenomenal enough as it was. Going in and singing the song and knowing that I could put my own spin on it, I could use my own voice, I could sing it will all of my heart and not be told how to sing it, that right there made it a pleasure to do.  Wondering whether or not it was going to be a hit was the very furthest thing from my mind because I knew better than to put all my eggs in one basket.  Four months later, [I got] a telephone call from John Watson from the label and it all began there – come to the UK and do Top of the Pops, I could not believe it was a real phone call. 

TOTP was quite the thing over here.

Oh my God, I was on that show with The Bangles, I loved The Bangles!  I think a couple of The Beegees were in the audience, I was like what the …?  Are you kidding me? I was very shy, too; I’m much more outgoing now because I have a lot more confidence, but I was very scared and it was new territory for me.  It was everything I ever dreamed of, happening literally overnight.  After so many years of trying, you forget about what that goal is and you just love your music, you do it with all of your heart.  There’s just so many times that you can send demos around saying here’s me as an artist and compete with the names that were out there at that point – don’t forget grunge was coming out so that was going to turn everything on its ear anyway.  It cracked that door open for me and I have never looked back since.

You’ve worked with a legendary who’s who of musicians and songwriters.  If you had to pick out the highlights, who would be the favourite people that you’ve worked with?

Oh boy, let’s hope no-one ever reads this!  In many ways, it’s not so much about the actual artists that I was working with as much as it is the whole environment.  The most fun that I ever had and what I appreciated the most was working with Arif Mardin; Arif had produced everyone from Aretha Franklin to Chaka Khan and every other artist in between. David Bowie, Chaka Khan and Leo Sayer … being in that environment, being even able to stand in the same room as someone like George Benson!  In the old days, you went to the studio, sometimes there would be a full orchestra there and there’s the full band, the rhythm section, the background singers, the producers, the engineers … the party never ends and it’s intense.  Aside from doing my own sessions and working with the singers and producers that I work with, it would be most difficult to say I enjoyed doing that project the most, because they are all equal in terms of the vibe that you get and then you separate that from the really bad ones you do, where they are really awful and you want to forget them and I’ve done hundreds of those.

Is there anyone that you haven’t collaborated with that you would really like to work with?

I think the list is really long!  I always wanted to do something with Steven Tyler and wished I could do something with Bryan Adams and Steve Perry.  I did get to do Rock Meets Classic and I got to share the stage with Ian Gillan and Jimi Jamison, who is one of my favourites.  I feel lucky that I did.  I did a duet with Clif Magness and he’s one of my favourite singer/songwriters and producers so that’s pretty cool.  I’ve sung backgrounds for Michael Bolton and back in the day he was just too much.  I do wish I could do a duet with him, I think we might have too much of a past history as friends to go there.  I also dreamed about doing a duet with Julian Lennon; he’s also a dear friend of mine, but I don’t think that that is in the cards.  I sure wouldn’t mind doing a duet with Ann Wilson but I think her sister would kick my ass!  

Having listened to the new album, your voice is still sounding really good; how do you look after it and keep it healthy?

Just using it – it’s a muscle.  If I’m over-singing, then of course I rest my voice, but in terms of doing scales and all that stuff, I was never into it and I’m far too lazy.  If you don’t use it, it gets a bit rusty, you have to get back in there and exercise that muscle, so I would say the more I sing, the more in shape my vocal cords remain.  Drink a lot of water!

If you had to introduce a new fan to your music, which album would you pick and why?

I think everybody should listen to the “Trouble Or Nothing” album, because everything that goes around, comes around; we’ve been in that phase with the resurgence of eighties rock music for a while now and it’s still going pretty strong.  Some of my other albums are very sentimental and on the softer side.  I’m going to have to say “Love Is Coming” is easily the best album I’ve ever done, from top to bottom, where there wasn’t a moment or a second of regret doing one single song.  I don’t listen to it over and over and over again, but when I do listen to it, I go “I really do like it!”  I think “Human Instinct” is also a really good album, although a bit dated sounding at this point.  It would be really hard to differentiate them in terms of their quality.

What do you listen to when you’re chilling out?  Do you have any recommendations for new music?

I’m always listening to mix tapes on my iPod.  I listen to Aerosmith and Bonnie Raitt and I listen to people that I don’t sound like.  I love jazz and I love all kinds of pop, but what I don’t love is rap [music].  I have to say it loud and proud, I am not a big fan of rap music, so you will never find that on my iPod.  My recommendations are still old school, go back and listen to some old Joe Cocker records, go back and listen to Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin.  Go back and listen to Billie Holliday, you know?   That’s where I always found my inspiration and the colours, the soulfulness and just the moods that were set.  A lot of times with the music that we have now, there’s no real mood.  I love some of the more modern pop singers of today, but I don’t spin them.

Your daughter, Olivia, has followed you into the business.  Do you encourage her?

Olivia’s passions are with musical theatre, but she can sing anything from opera to metal and anything in between.  Between me and her Dad [James], she just has it in her genes.  She’s a very talented actress and she’s signed to two major agencies, she does commercials, she’s doing some film, she’s singing on record.  At the age of 20, I was still going to Seven Eleven for dinner and she’s going to five star restaurants.  I’m really happy for her that she’s working and beating the path.  I encourage it, but if she didn’t love it, I wouldn’t say a word.  I’m extremely proud of her.

The music business has always been and is still relatively male dominated.  Do you feel it’s been hard going as a female artist?

I think being a woman is always an advantage.  I’ve never felt threatened by men or by men running any business, so long as they don’t paint me into a corner and do something to me personally, it’s business.  As far as singing is concerned, I take all my cues from guys who are the greatest singers ever, they’re who I follow, so it only made my life easier to listen to people like Steve Perry and Steven Tyler.  It’s never been a problem for me, but it really isn’t a ‘man’s world’, that is such nonsense.

What advice would you give to any new singers or bands that are just starting out?

First of all, I would ask them to please not be full of themselves.  Secondly, I’d tell them not to kid themselves.  Thirdly, I would tell them that there’s a lot of bad elements in this business and it is not a walk in the park; you really do have to dig your heels in and you’re gonna have to fail a lot before you succeed, but don’t give up.  If it’s your passion, just stick with it; if ever a day comes where it doesn’t make you happy and doesn’t bring happiness to the people around you, take on something else, but never give up your passion. Never.  Okay, so get a day job and move along with it, but keep it going.  Everybody that’s worth their salt that I’m friends with and that’s helped me throughout their career, they’re not making money out of it.  The most beautiful thing about that is that they’re such terrific people.  I’m a great collaborator and that’s also a piece of advice – collaborating is loads of fun and that’s the way you learn.  A lot of inspiration will come from what you do with other people.

What’s next for Robin Beck?

I don’t think about it very much.  If I thought about it, I might think I was missing out on something, I mean so many of my friends are going on cruises and they’re travelling the world, basically with their feet up.  When I try to do those sort of things, I do love it, but for very short spurts.  I get bored quickly and I really do think that for myself and also for James, we’re happiest and healthiest when we’re creating and I think we’re nicest when we’re happy with what we’re doing.  Thinking forward, do I want to stop [doing this]?  I haven’t given it any real thought and the music business may stop me before I stop it, but I have no plans to stop.  I don’t know if I could do anything else, to be honest, and I certainly cannot sit and do nothing.  I want to be on stage – that floats my boat.   

Links –

 

Disclaimer:  This interview is solely the property of Vikkie Richmond and Ever Metal.  It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the permission of both parties.  Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Jens Westin / Corroded Interview

Corroded logo

Jens Westin / Corroded interview

by Rick Tilley

I really hadn’t heard much of Swedish band Corroded until their latest album, the brilliant “Defcon Zero”, was sent to Ever Metal earlier in the year. However, this is a band that has created music for a Swedish TV show and the hugely popular video game Battlefield plus has topped the music charts in their home country! Now signed to Despotz Records they are intent on spreading the name Corroded much further afield and with the ‘international’ sound they have it’s not going to be difficult to do that. Recently I was lucky enough to get the chance to chat to Lead Vocalist and Guitarist Jens Westin about the band and even though he is a man of few words it’s clear to see is passion about his music!

Rick – Hi, I’m Rick from Ever Metal. It’s great to be able to ask you some questions. Firstly would you be able to give us a little background about Corroded for those who haven’t heard of you before?

Jens – CORRODED started out in 2004 and I (Jens) am the only original member left from that setup. Today the setup is me on vocals/lead guitar, Bjarne Elvsgard on bass, Tomas Andersson lead guitar and Per Solang on drums.

Your latest album ‘Defcon Zero’ has recently been released. I think it’s fantastic but how has it been received so far?

It has been received really good by the fans and also by the critics .

It’s been five years since your previous album ‘State Of Disgrace’ was released. I know you’ve been gigging regularly in-between albums but was there another reason why it took so long?

We decided that it was time for us to change label, and it took a really long time for everything to come together the way we wanted it to. But our new label (Despotz Records) is awesome, so it is all fine and dandy nowadays.

Your music is difficult to categorise! I don’t like giving music genre tags but most readers like to know where a band sits on the Metal/Rock spectrum and the closest I could come up with was Pantera meets Shinedown! To most that might sound like an odd combination so how would you describe your music?

I usually say that it lies in the ear of the beholder. It’s very hard for us to, to say what kind of musical genre we find ourselves in. Our standard answer is Hard Rock, because I think that it encompass almost every genre within the spectra.

I wasn’t expecting your music to be so hugely catchy, to add to what I said previously, it sounds like a dose of Modern Metal mixed with commercial American Hard Rock. How do you go about writing new material? Is it an individual or complete band process?

 It is a complete band process. We tend to start with a riff from me (Jens) or Tomas, and then we will take it from there as a band to a finished song.

In this day and age it’s not easy standing out, however, I cannot think of another band who sounds quite like Corroded! Who were your influences when growing up and what current bands do you like?

We have one common denominator and that is Black Sabbath, otherwise we have a lot of different musical influences within the band. For me it started with The Beatles and then AC/DC, then came bands like Black Sabbath, Metallica and so forth. For the moment I’m really in to Mastodon, Biffy Clyro, Meshuggah, Testament and Clutch.

You’ve become very popular in your home country of Sweden. Can you try and tell us what that rise in popularity has felt like?

It’s really hard to describe, because for us it has been a gradual climb up the ladder so to say. But one thing is for sure..…..It feels great J

You recently played Sweden Rock Festival to what looked like a huge crowd. That must have been a special moment?

Yeah, that was a real hallelujah moment. We didn’t think that it would be that many people there, since we played rather early on the last day of the festival. But when we came up on the stage and saw the crowd, man that was something else.

Scandinavian Countries seem to produce a vast amount of successful Metal and Rock bands. Why do you think that is?

I’m not sure. If I knew the reason why, I would sell it by the bottle and be a billionaire. I think that part of the reason is because we have a good music school for the kids, and I really think that the Scandinavian weather is a part of it too.

You’ve also recently been announced as main support on Pain’s European tour in October and November. How are you looking forward to that?

It’s going to be great. We spoke with Peter Tätgren when we played at Sweden Rock, and pretty much decided there on the spot.

Unfortunately, there are no UK dates on that tour. Are you trying to plan any UK dates in the near future?

We would really like to come to the UK as soon as possible, but as always it comes down to monetary issues.

What other countries/parts of the world would you love to play?

Everywhere. Where there is a CORRODED show going on, that is a good place to be.

Are you constantly writing new material or will you be waiting until the end of this touring cycle before coming up with ideas for your next album?

We are more or less constantly writing stuff, but we won’t do any recording until we feel that we have the time.

I’m sure you don’t want to wait a further five years before releasing another album so do you already have plans for when you would like to release a follow up or are you just going to see what happens next with ‘Defcon Zero’?

We have a couple of ideas, but nothing that we can be specific about for the time being.

The internet is now such an important tool for promoting a band and its music but it’s also a curse for illegal downloading so how do you budget how much to spend, for example, on a video or cover art knowing that some people will just download the album or individual songs for free?

That is something that our management and label takes care of.

Is there anything else you would like to add before we finish?

We are really looking forward to meet all of you out there on the road, but until we do….. Horns Up

I’d like to take this opportunity to say a big thank you for taking the time to chat to Ever Metal, continued good luck with ‘Defcon Zero’, it’s a great album, and I hope you can get over to UK shores soon because I for one will be there to see you!

Thank you!/Jens

There you have it! As mentioned in the interview, Corroded will be supporting Pain on their upcoming Mainland European Tour (Dates below) and if you get a chance to see them then please do! Since this interview was completed Corroded have also released ‘The Nevo Sessions’, a beautiful acoustic EP that should definitely be checked out as well! Jens may not be a man of many words but Corroded let the music do the talking and that is the most important thing!

Corroded tour date pic

 

Links –

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Richard Tilley and Ever Metal.  It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties.  Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.