Interview with Chris LoPorto, Vocalist for Can’t Swim

Can_t Swim

Interview with Chris LoPorto, Vocalist for Can’t Swim
Interview by Stephen Moss

Hi Everyone , Rick Here,

On 1st December our, Stateside, guest reviewer Stephen Moss went to see US rock band Can’t Swim play a gig at the (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York City. Whilst he was there he also managed to do an interview with vocalist Chris LoPorto. I’d like to thank Stephen and Andy Jansons at JM Pressphoto Agency for sending us the interview and, of course to Chris for answering the questions!

 

Stephen Moss: “Your uncle was a famous drummer and you played drums in many bands. When you took the role of lead singer and guitar player, did you find yourself overly critiquing the drum lines because you had so much experience as a drummer, or did you give your drummer the freedom to make their own lines?”

Chris LoPorto: “I recorded the drums on our first release. Now, Danny and I split the drumming duty when we record. But i’m not a control freak in any way, whoever is playing drums for us live, I always tell them to add their own spice to the parts.”

Stephen Moss: “How has your writing style evolved since you first released your Death Deserves a Name – EP?”

Chris LoPorto: “I think I have a better idea of what I want Can’t Swim to be now. I know what we can and cannot do. Also, it’s far more collaborative, we are a band who make records together, not just myself making demos on a laptop anymore.”

Stephen Moss: “It’s been said, “Music can cure things medicine can’t.” For many song writers, writing is therapeutic and it’s a way to help themselves. What’s it been like to hear stories and talk to people who use your music as a therapy treatment to help them cope with their life?”

Chris LoPorto: “It’s lovely and something I never thought would happen. Gives me a sense of purpose and pushes me to work hard at this band. It’s a realization that it’s not just loud rock music, if a person can feel better about their situation hearing about what I’ve been through, that’s a very special thing.”

Stephen Moss: “When you’re playing on stage and you hear the crowd singing your songs, are you able to take a second and soak that in or are you focused on the chords and the next lyrics?”

Chris LoPorto: “My job is very easy on stage, I can totally focus on the crowd and take it in. I wouldn’t want to do it any other way.”

Stephen Moss: “When writing songs, do you write the lyrics first or the music first?”

Chris LoPorto: “Depends. Usually the music and melody come first. Then i’ll write words to fit the melodies. I like for the vibe of the music to inspire the lyrics.”

Stephen Moss: “You had said before that some of your songs are first done on acoustic guitar. Is there any plans on doing an unplugged album?”

Chris LoPorto: “Oh jeez, I hope not hahaha.”

Stephen Moss: “You guys do a great live show, any plans for a live album or a cover album?”

Chris LoPorto: “I don’t think so, no.”

Stephen Moss: “If you could pick one band to tour with past or present, who would it be and why?”

Chris LoPorto: “Drake. I listen to his records a lot and he seems like a friendly guy.”

Stephen Moss: “Are you a sports fans?”

Chris LoPorto: “I’m not.”

Stephen Moss: “As someone from NJ, I have to ask…Taylor Ham or Pork Roll?”

Chris LoPorto: “Go veg, save the planet.”

Stephen Moss: “I spoke to Jesse from 10 Years and he said “I’ve been all around the world but there’s something special about coming to Knoxville because it’s home.” You guys have also toured around the globe. Is it still special coming back to Jersey?”

Chris LoPorto: “It’s funny, we started the band so abruptly, we don’t have much of a hometown feeling when playing NJ. it’s great to see friends and family but, we’ve probably played Nebraska just as much as we’ve played NJ.”

Stephen Moss: “So far, what’s been your favourite city to play a show in?”

Chris LoPorto: “Orlando.”

Stephen Moss: “What’s the weirdest thing that’s happened on the road?”

Chris LoPorto: “I’ve spent 3 years of my life looking at interstates.”

Stephen Moss: “As a band, what are some of your goals?”

Chris LoPorto: “We don’t really get too caught up in that stuff. We love what we are doing now and just want to do it more often. Getting a chance to play shows and make records is something we don’t take for granted.”

Stephen Moss: “Your tour schedule is crazy busy! Many shows are played back to back. How are you able to give 100% each show?”

Chris LoPorto: “Coffee! A lot of coffee!”

Stephen Moss: “I wish I was kidding but, every time I wear your shirt people ask me if I can swim. It’s a clever name because then I have to explain to them that it’s a band and we end up having a conversation about your band. So, I have to ask you, Have you learned to swim yet?”

Chris LoPorto: “Certainly not. Don’t plan on it either cause I can’t think of what else to call the band.”

Stephen Moss: “Will you be putting more of your videos on Apple Music?”

Chris LoPorto: “I have no idea. I don’t even have a smart phone.”

Stephen Moss: “I’m asking for selfish reasons but, there is a beautiful venue in Jersey City called “White Eagle Hall” or “Maxwells” in Hoboken where Nirvana played. Do you guys have plans to play any North Jersey gigs?”

Chris LoPorto: “Do they still do shows at Maxwells? I would love to play there, hook it up.”

Stephen Moss: “Do you guys still keep in touch with Andrea? (ex Can’t Swim drummer and long time friend) If so, any plans on having her be a special appearance and drum on a few tracks or shows?”

Chris LoPorto: “Totally, she played drums on two tracks of our newest record.”

Stephen Moss: “Did you guys have an epiphany moment where you realized, “Hey, we can do this full time.” Like, at what moment did you realize that this band had something special?”

Chris LoPorto: “When we first got signed, tours quickly started rolling in and we didn’t even have a chance to ponder if we could do it or not, we just had to. I think i’m still in that mind set almost like the alarm is going off and i’m rushing to make it to work on time.”

Stephen Moss: “When preparing for this interview, I was talking with a very good friend of mine named Melissa. Her favourite band is Taking Back Sunday. I asked her if she had the opportunity to interview Taking Back Sunday, what would she ask? She said two things, 1) “Can I be your best friend?” And 2) “Can I touch your hair?” Hahahaha. This made me think, what’s some weird things that you’ve been asked during an interview?”

Chris LoPorto: “If someone asks me if I can swim or if pineapple belongs on pizza, I’m probably going to quit the band.”

Stephen Moss: “Thank you for your time. I’ll see you at your next show in Jersey/NYC.”

Chris LoPorto: “Likewise. Be well and thanks for doing this.”

CHECK OUT CAN’T SWIM AT THE FOLLOWING LINKS:
https://www.cantswimmusic.com/
https://www.facebook.com/cantswim/

https://www.instagram.com/cantswim_/
https://cantswimmusic.tumblr.com/

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Stephen Moss and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Seven Sisters

 

263857_Seven_Sisters_pic_2

 

Seven Sisters are a four-piece metal band from West London, England forged from the same steel as the NWOBHM acts of yesteryear. They have gained a reputation as a “stellar” act in the heavy metal scene, playing shows all over the UK and Europe and proving that “they are not simply copying the template laid down by the fathers of heavy  metal but they are moulding their own sound to usher in a new era.”

I recently had the chance to interview Graeme from the band and here is what he had to say:

Hi, I am Dawn from Ever Metal. Thank you for taking the time to answer some questions for us. I hope you are all well?

All good here, cheers for talking to us!

Ok, for those who don’t know who you guys are, can you tell us a bit about the background of the band?

Sure! We’re a Heavy Metal band from West London, currently promoting and touring our second album which was recently released on Dissonance Productions. Our sound is a bit of a mix of old school Heavy Metal (the NWOBHM movement in particular) and elements of power metal, thrash metal and things like that. We’re pretty progressive in places, but our songs are heavily melodic and hopefully pretty catchy too.

So, your new album, The Cauldron and The Cross, was released in April of this year. How has it been received?

Yeah it’s been received really well on the whole! We’re not massively surprised as we were really happy with the way the album turned out, but it’s always nice when people understand and buy into what you’re trying to do as a band.

Would you consider yourself part of the NWOTHM (New Wave of Traditional Heavy Metal) movement? If not, what would you describe your particular genre?

Yeah I guess so. I’m not sure how much of a coherent movement it is, but there’s definitely a fair few bands around playing traditional-sounding metal, and we’re one of those bands. I don’t think we’re a straight up copy of the original sound of the late 70s and early 80s, but it’s definitely a major influence and I think that should be pretty obvious to anyone listening to our music. We prefer to just think of ourselves as a Heavy Metal band though, rather than trying to pigeonhole it too specifically. It’s too easy to become obsessed with genre labels, rather than just listening to something on its own merit and deciding if you like it or not.

We all have a guilty pleasure when it comes to music, what’s yours?

Not really, actually. I listen to all sorts of stuff, but I don’t feel guilty or embarrassed by any of it as it’s all music I like. I listen to plenty of stuff that isn’t Heavy Metal. But if you mean things that people might be slightly surprised by, then ABBA are one of my favourite bands of all time. That might be a guilty pleasure for some people, but I think they were amazing songwriters with an incredible sense of melody. Some of their song structures are more similar to the type of thing you’d expect a prog band to do than a pop group, but a lot of people don’t even notice as the songs are so well-written and catchy. I think that’s something a lot of metal bands could learn a thing or two from, actually.

What bands have been your greatest influences, both individually and as a band?

Obviously the NWOBHM movement, as I mentioned earlier. But we like a lot of European and North American bands too. Helloween really spring to mind here. We’re also pretty obsessed with Yngwie Malmsteen! We listen to all sorts of stuff individually though. I’m really into hair metal and AOR, Kyle listens to a lot of progressive rock (Frank Zappa is his idol), and Steve and Javi like some of the more extreme stuff like thrash and death metal. This probably all creeps into the overall sound of Seven Sisters in one way or another.

If you could bring back one metal legend, who would it be and why?

Most of my metal heroes are still alive actually. I’d maybe say Ingo Schwichtenberg. I really like the first three Helloween albums, they were a massive part of me growing up and getting into metal, and he’s one of my favourite drummers of all time. I would have loved to get to see him play live.

How have you been enjoying your recent gigs with Toledo Steel? I was gutted I missed the British Steel 2 Festival at the end of May.

Yeah they’ve been fun! Toledo Steel are good friends of ours, and they’re a great live band so it was cool getting to watch them do their thing every night. They’re really funny guys and great company too, so we had a right laugh driving round the country in a van with them. I can’t ever remember laughing as much as I did on that tour!

There has been some controversy over the price of gig tickets recently what with the Ozzy Osbourne/Judas Priest and Metallica gigs. Do you think metal shows are overpriced?

I guess they can’t be over-priced if people are willing to pay them and the shows still sell out, but personally I’m not interested in paying £140 to see Lars Ulrich attempting to play the drums. I’ve always found it interesting that Maiden’s ticket prices are significantly lower than bands like Metallica and Ozzy – and Maiden are actually still good live too. I guess maybe some bands treat their fans with a bit more respect than others, but that’s nothing new. If people are willing to pay crazy money to see a band, I don’t have a problem with it. I just have better uses for my severely limited bank balance myself!

Who is the driving force behind the band? Is there one of you that takes charge and organises everyone else?

Kyle is definitely our driving force. The vast majority of the music comes from him, although I chip in with a riff or two here and there if I have anything good. The lyrics are more of a collaborative effort between the two of us, and Steve and Javi then come up with their own drum and bass parts. So whilst Kyle is definitely the mastermind of the band, I think the songs wouldn’t sound the same if it wasn’t for the individual input of all four of us.

So, what’s next on the horizon for Seven Sisters?

We’re playing some shows in Europe and Ireland over the autumn to promote the new album, and we’re hoping to do as many summer festivals next year as we can. After that, I guess it’ll be time to sit down and start working on a third album!

Well, thank you for your time. Is there anything else you would like to add?

Not a problem. Thanks for talking to us, and cheers to anyone that took the time to read this!

 

SOCIAL LINKS:

 

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Dawn “The Metal Priestess” King and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Toledo Steel

 

32720260_1682455328542499_5982270555720515584_o

Toledo Steel are one the leading forces in the NWOTHM wave. Recently, I had the chance to do an email interview with Richard from the band.

Hi! I’m Dawn from Ever Metal. Thank you for taking the time to answer some questions for us. I hope you are all ok?

Hey! Yeah we’re all doing great cheers. Glad we can be doing this interview with you!

Ok, for those who haven’t heard of Toledo Steel before, can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

The band officially formed back in late 2011, myself and Matt Dobson (our drummer) are the only two original members from that first lineup though. We both wanted to form this kind of band for a few years prior to actually meeting each other but we didn’t have much luck finding likeminded people. This soon changed though after we put our heads together and it wasn’t long before we had our first lineup and were busy writing songs in preparation to get out there and play live.
Since our formation we released a bunch of demo tracks and followed it up with two self financed independently released E.P’s. We love playing live of course and have always tried to play as many shows as possible! Not just within the U.K but venturing over to Europe fairly frequently too.

Your debut album “No Quarter” was released through Dissonance Productions on the 18th May 2018. How is being received, both by the critics and reviewers and by the public? And, more importantly, how did the album release party go?

So far the feedback we’ve been receiving has been great! You only have one chance to make a statement with the first album and you don’t wanna drop the ball and undo the good work you’ve done in the years prior with the building up of the bands name and profile. We couldn’t have asked for a better album release show either, it was tied in with the Frost and Fire festival which took place in Camden and we played the official after party. The festival was totally sold out and everyone in attendance was already on a high from the whole thing so it only contributed even more so to a great atmosphere when we played.

You have been doing a lot of gigs with Seven Sisters, how has that been? How was the British Steel 2 festival at the end of May? I was gutted I missed that!

The shows with Seven Sisters have been awesome. They’re a great bunch of guys that we get along with really well so teaming up with them as much as we can makes total sense. The British Steel 2 event was cool also, that was also Primitai’s album release show who are also signed to Dissonance Productions so it was great to see that.

With festival season now in full swing, what would be your favourite festival to play and why?

There’s so many great festivals so that’s a tough question to answer but something like Sweden Rock or Hellfest would be great exposure to a bigger audience. There’s so many cool smaller festivals too that we want to play, Keep it True in Germany for example.

You are a favourite with Dean Archer at The Rock Den in Hatfield. What do you think of guys like him and what they are doing for the rock/metal scene?

I think that people like Dean are essential to the music scene and the future of Rock and Metal music. He makes a real effort to bring different bands to the Rock Den and play alongside some of the more established older bands. If every city had promoters and venues like this, there’s no doubt that the scene within the U.K could begin to thrive even more so.

Your website describes you as “one of the UK’s leading forces in the New Wave of Traditional Heavy Metal!” Is this just the new name for NWOBHM?

I guess so! The NWOTHM tagline just makes it clear that it’s a new wave of bands coming through with the NWOBHM inspired sound. The term NWOBHM is specific to that era so it makes sense to alter it slightly.

With venues closing down all the time and people seemingly preferring to watch cover bands and tribute bands, where do you see the future of metal lies? Some of the “older” metal heads are saying there is nothing new coming through. Do you think this is the case?

People who say that there’s nothing new coming through need to open their eyes and ears a bit more! Haha. There’s plenty of new rock and metal bands emerging the world over. Sure, it’s not all gold and you gotta scratch beneath the surface a bit to discover these bands but there most definitely is a lot of new stuff worth listening to.

How do you all cope with being in a band, with rehearsals and gigs etc as well as jobs and family life? You must all be knackered all the time!

None of us have kids so that simplifies things and we work it around our day jobs fairly easy enough. We’re not robots, so yeah there are days where we’re a little tired but I personally feel like I’ve always got energy. I like to be as active as possible really, I can’t sit down for hours on end in front of the T.V for instance. Having something to constantly look forward to or do band wise outside of day to day life suits us down to the ground really.

Who is the driving force behind the band? You know, the guy that organises rehearsals, gets you all together when you need to be, that sort of thing?

Matt is great with all the organisation of things and the finer details. He is essentially the band manager and he’s done a fantastic job. We tend to always rehearse on the same day each week so we all know the score with that, but the booking of shows and networking side of things is handled primarily by him.

So, what’s next on the horizon for Toledo Steel?

Next up we plan to continue getting out there playing live and promoting the new album of course! We’re also gonna start working on ideas for album number two fairly soon as well. A music video for one of the album tracks is well under way too and it won’t be long before we’ll be able to release that! We’re really excited to get that finished off and up online, it’s looking pretty cool so far.

Thank you very much for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add yourselves?

No worries and cheers to everyone that’s supported us so far and continues to do so. “No Quarter” can be streamed online via Spotify or physical copies bought from us directly or via Amazon, HMV Stores or ITunes etc. Keep supporting emerging bands and spread the word to keep the music and scene alive!

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Dawn “The Metal Priestess” King and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Desolation Angels

DA_Band_02

Desolation Angels were one of the forefathers of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal era. Now, nearly forty years later, they are still rocking and I, recently, had the chance to interview them.

Hi, I’m Dawn from Ever Metal. Thank you for taking the time to talk to us and I hope you are all ok?

Hi Dawn, yes we are all ok thanks.

Ok, so for those who have been hiding in a remote cave somewhere for the past thirty odd years, can you give us a quick background of the band?

Desolation Angels was formed in early 1981 by childhood friends Robin Brancher and Keith Sharp based in the East End of London. The band started writing and rehearsing and soon built up a reputation playing live.

The band’s first single, ‘Valhalla’, was recorded at a studio in Cheltenham in 1982 and, by this time, the band was touring extensively the UK. In 1984, their debut self titled album ‘Desolation Angels’ was recorded at Thameside Studios, London

After spending eight years in the USA playing live shows and recording, the band returned to the UK.

* After various personnel changes since the reformation of Desolation Angels in 2012, the band members are: Robin Brancher (guitar), Keith Sharp (guitar), Clive Pearson (bass), Chris Takka (drums) Paul Taylor (vocals).

Answered Clive Pearson

So, your latest album “King” (great name by the way!) was released on February 23rd of this year (2018), how is it being received? I see you have had some great reviews.

The name seems to have been a good choice, well done to Rob on that one….. it needs to be mentioned first that we were so fortunate to have Chris Tsangeridies listen to the demos and see the potential in the songs to agree to give us his time to make this album so special in so many ways. It so tragic that this was to be his final gift to the music world as he certainly took this on to ensure he handed over a fantastic album. He brought out the best in DA AND we will be ever thankful to his dedication to produce and engineer these songs which the ‘reviews tell it all. The enjoyment of working with Chris and hearing all his tales of his past were very entertaining when recording can be such a stressful experience. He put the fun and enjoyment into those weeks of hard work…. the album is selling very well and so it should as it is one of those albums that gets better each time you listen to it. That is down to the song writing and the great man CT…. thanks Chris may you RIP in Valhalla with your great friend Gary Moore.

Answered by Clive Pearson.

And how was it working with the late, great Chris Tsangeridis?

I may have answered that in previous question.

He was a true musician who loved working in the industry and to help those musicians around him. His history speaks for itself and no air of greatness within his personality which could really have been the case. He’d work with anyone who had desire and commitment to their music… see his autobiography as it would take the whole Metal Nation edition to cover his character and albums.

Answered by Clive Pearson.

The official launch party for the album was on March 23rd at The Devonshire Arms in Camden. I was gutted I couldn’t get there. How did it go? Lots of drunkenness and shenanigans?

The Dev is a perfect venue for this event as it is a true metal pub in Camden which is one of the most diverse towns in London. Great atmosphere and punters. I think my other half should cover the drunken shenanigans as she won that one hands down. I give you her number and the Premier Inn in London where she was carried to after the gig and made a grand entrance…….. I am sure they can fill you in on that one… lots of punters were up for a big night and it did not disappoint.

Answered by Clive Pearson.

So, you are happy with the line up now?

It’s not just a line up it’s a big family with all the wives and girlfriends part of the group.

Answered by Paul Chatfield

I checked out your latest tour dates on your website and I see you are doing a lot of double headers with another great band Sacrilege (and some with support from Satan’s Empire). What’s is like working with those guys? They are all a great bunch.

They are all a great bunch. We have got a few under our belts already and the one that stands out was at the Underworld in Camden … I seem to get on well in Camden……… Sacrilege are a real good time rock and roll party animals that enjoy themselves on and off stage. We are also pretty much the same age so got a lot of those old days to catch up on and reminisce about. Satan’s Empire have a new album out and sure deliver live. I know Paul Lewis from when he was in Belladonna so cool to be gigging with them now..
Look forward to the next ones coming up…

Answered by Clive Pearson.

And you have the NWOBHM GDR #3 in Nuneaton in November. Are you looking forward to that? It’s a shame it’s not in London again though.

We played the first one in London and good to see it gathering pace a few years now. Great to have Tokyo Blade, Tysondog on the bill plus The Deep & Airforce. We all gigging regularly over the years so will be a big party.

Tokyo Blade will be the 2nd time we shared the stage who are good friends with Rob and Keith so good times will be had…

You play in Europe a lot. Do you think your music is better received there and do you prefer playing there or on home soil?

We really enjoy playing in Europe, the fans seem more dedicated, they know the material and really appreciate the fact you come over. I suppose we were a bit spoilt for choice in the UK. There is, and has always been loads of great bands evolved here through the years so fans have a massive choice. Don’t get me wrong it’s fantastic to play to a great crowd in the UK but the European crowds seem to let their hair down a bit more and really rock out.

Answered by Paul Taylor

I am the first to admit that I am not the biggest fan of NWOBHM (yet here I am interviewing one of the original bands from the era!) and I must say I prefer the last album to the earlier stuff. What have you done that has changed your sound so that even a NWOBHM-disliker like me loved your album?

The NWOBHM label is just that, a label! It was just a way to remarket what had always been there, good old-fashioned rock bands. All the radio stations just played either disco music or punk. Purple, Sabbath, UFO, Uriah Heep, Wishbone Ash, Budgie, Lizzy and Priest were still all there and they inspired us, younger bands. So it could be that you like the King album because we’re now better at producing great rock albums than we were 30 years ago . The original values of the music are the same as they’ve always been, strong powerful guitar riffs with a solid rhythm section and melodic vocal tunes with interesting lyrics. We chose Chris T to produce the album because of his fantastic track record and his love of great rock music. He loved the album and did a brilliant job. It would seem that we’ve done what we intended to do, make an album traditional NWOBHM fans would like but also cross the boundaries in to the established hard rock fan base who would normally dismiss NWOBHM bands because of the label.

Answered by Paul Taylor

Ok, so I am friends with most, if not all of you, on social media of some sort, whether it’s Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and I have seen you “in the flesh” so to speak. You are all a great bunch of guys and I would love to interview you face to face after a gig at some point! Would this be ok with you guys?

For sure we always happy to give interviews and answer question for readers on Skype or phone.
Or come backstage after gig and we can have few beers and chat..

So, what’s next for Desolation Angels?

Keep on gigging for as long as we can and record the next album.

Answered by Paul Chatfield

Well, thank you so much for your time. I look forward to seeing you on the road and maybe we can get that interview squeezed in. Is there anything you would like to add?

Thanks for asking us to do this interview spread the word http://www.desolationangels.co.uk

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Dawn “The Metal Priestess” King and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Callus at Wrexfest

Callus Video Interview
Wrexfest, Wrexham
28/07/2018
Interview by Beth Jones
Intro by Rick Tilley

Ever Metal is very proud to present its first ever video interview…yes, this is so much easier than transcribing everything, and what better way to kick off than Beth’s interview with the awesome Callus when they visited our home town of Wrexham last week to play Wrexfest!

I was there but was desperately trying to keep a straight face as there had been quite a bit of silliness leading up to the recording, anyway, enjoy (we know we have to make a couple of adjustments with the microphone for next time) and listen out for the title announcement of the debut Callus album which is slipped in about half way through. You heard it here first!!

Huge thanks to Louis, Ben and Ryan for the interview!

CALLUS Interview:

CALLUS LINKS:
https://www.facebook.com/Callus.band/
https://www.instagram.com/callus_uk/
https://callus117.bandcamp.com/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZOSaYdZBmL8DhLMPjLWggQ

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Beth Jones, Richard Tilley and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Rage Sadler from Kaine

14590494_1662452200733779_1059519836905560625_n-1

Kaine are a four piece heavy metal band, hailing from East Anglia in England, and have helped to keep the spirit of NWOBHM alive. I recently had the pleasure of being able to do an email interview with founder and vocalist Rage Sadler.

Hi, I’m Dawn from Ever Metal. Thank you for taking the time to talk to me today. I hope you are well?

I have had just 5 hours sleep between shifts, got home a few hours ago and now I am back doing band stuff, a little tired but this beats the hell out of warehouse work that’s for sure!

Ok, for those who haven’t heard of Kaine, could you tell us a little bit about the history of the band? 

We started out in 2009, so nearly 10 years ago. Essentially, we formed in a scene of Metalcore with the ambition to try and rebuild the old school Metal scene and do music in the vein of bands from the golden era of Metal back in the 1980’s. We did very well, considering how little support we had when we started, and we’ve gone onto some huge things for an unknown band from East Anglia!

Your third album, A Crisis of Faith, was released on 1st February 2018. How is it being received?

There was a lot of hype and coverage, both positively and negatively, for the previous album, The Waystone, for example and a significant amount of sales, whereas with ACOF there hasn’t been the same hype but in terms of those who have followed and bought it, it’s been overwhelmingly positively received this time around.

I see how hard you, and the band as a whole, work to promote yourself and the album. Does it frustrate you when you don’t get the recognition I, for one, think you deserve?

Not as much as you would think really. I am a fairly realistic type of bloke and that’s why people often write me off as negative. The truth is I don’t expect a career out of my music either way. Some bands make it, and some do not, it’s a bit like a lottery in some respects. Yeah connections, hard work, image, quality sounds and songs will work in your favour but only a small percentage of bands will ever draw a living from music and it’s no shame in not being one of those who cannot because that’s the majority. The point I tried to make recently, and one I think that was misunderstood and wasn’t necessarily even solely relevant to my band was this, if you love any band’s music and want them to push on, buy a CD, T-Shirt and attend a couple of gigs. If the band’s sales go up and their gigs are attended then the industry will take notice because in their eyes that band is a draw and will make them money. It’s that easy!

How about when you do live gigs? I’ve seen you post that you have played to very few people at times. Does this not dishearten you?

Again, I highlight where things go badly to help better educate the wider audience about the struggle all bands go through, not just my band and it relates back to that earlier point. How can any band hope to make it when so many people will turn their noses up at a free entry gig to sit at home instead? Kaine is in a weird situation, sometimes we can play some bad gigs, usually due to lack of promotion and play to smaller crowds, but we can go on decent runs of shows averaging 50-100 people and earlier this year we played to around 3000. It’s bizarre, so while it sucks to play to so few sometimes after all the work and travel we are rewarded with the good ones too. 

But you recently played HRH Metal at Birmingham. How was that for you?

Definitely a career highlight.  I am not someone who gets nervous or worried about shows. If its 5 or 5000 I will usually deliver the same performance because it’s what I love to do more than anything else. We really did deliver that show well, it was incredibly well received. To be a main stage act and effectively support Grave Digger was huge for us. It may never happen again either, once in a lifetime.

Obviously, one of the biggest pieces of news coming out of the Kaine camp recently was Chris announcing he was leaving the band. How did this affect the rest of you?

It was a huge blow, certainly emotionally. Chris has played with me for 6 years, he was a 17-year-old kid when he first started in the band and we’ve literally been through hell together. It was a huge surprise given everything and how close it was to the album release. He just couldn’t afford to do it any longer without a huge band income coming in, and as I stated if bands can’t sell CD’s, shirts and people won’t show up to gigs then you’re going to struggle to keep members. Again, that’s not just us, many bands lose members every week because of this very reason and often to a very sad reception online, but if those people bought the albums it would never happen. We have enough Facebook likes that if people bought the record it would chart! The 2016-2018 Kaine line-up was a special one because we fought through the ashes of the old band to become something stronger and produce a world class album, we stood together and worked extremely hard to deliver that record and that to me is the tragedy of it ending so soon. It could have easily killed the band.

You found a replacement in Liam Etheridge. What made him stand out for you?

Liam is a drummer I have known for about 5 years now. He was originally in a band called Asylum which gigged with us a few times as support back in the day. I already knew him well enough to know he wasn’t a total dickhead and I knew that in terms of his ability on drums he would be able to learn and adapt to our style with a huge potential to do even more. He turned up in one session and pretty much could play an entire set. In fact, he’s only having one more rehearsal this week before his debut on Friday, so he’s proving his dedication early on to the band. I prefer to find good people with huge potential to work with for the band rather than use established people from the scene.  Liam is already a great drummer, but I can see him growing and becoming one of the best on the scene. It really is an opportunity for him.

I know you are not backward in coming forward about your views, so what do you think is the future of metal?

Metal will always be there in some guise or another. You have acts like Ghost who are essentially blazing a trail for that old school sound in the mainstream even though it may not to be everyone taste, I think that’s an incredibly good thing for Metal. Big riffs, epic chorus’s, evil aesthetic alongside those clean vocals. On the heavier old school front, you have Savage Messiah who are now really pushing on, for the old school scene Seven Sisters and Toledo Steel are making amazing progress of late, so while it may seems a little low at the moment there’s tons of bands out there who could potentially be the next big thing. We need rebirth and renewal in Metal music really. We have had the same acts for 30 years more or less holding onto those top spots and while there’s always a place for legends, we also need to have some renewal and regrowth for Metal to push through again, much like it did in 2000-01.

A lot of people don’t like a spade being called a spade. Do you think your outspokenness (if that is even a word!) affects your popularity?

I really don’t worry about it. There’s a lot of people who do not like me for whatever reason, but I can’t let that be my focus. Frankly they don’t always firmly understand my comments and make assumptions on what I’m trying to say based on their own predetermined prejudices about me. The most common thing I get when meeting people is “I was told you were a total c**t but your actually a really nice guy!”.  I don’t need to be popular, Axel Rose isn’t well liked and he’s a millionaire! 

I read the note you posted saying what the lyrics to the tracks on A Crisis of Faith meant. Was this a kind of therapeutic process for you as you state that they are a reflection of many issues you have dealt with?

I decided to write this album from the heart and deliver an emotional experience alongside the musical one. I have had an absolutely shocking few years in my life both inside and outside of music, and I am not sure it was therapy so much as trying to keep it real. The words are actual feelings, actual experiences, not just there to add music value to the song. If you sense sadness, hope, frustration, loneliness, anger, despair, and the like while listening than that’s a great part of the experience. 

You are on the bill for the next Mearfest. Are you all looking forward to that?

We’re always happy to play Mearfest. Brian and Clare have been incredible to us these past few years and have done a lot for good causes by turning loss into legacy. I am immensely proud to have played a part in that process, especially given the background. When people work hard and focus on good they can do a lot of positive in the world.

And as festival season approaches, what festival would you most like to play and why?

We sadly haven’t been approached by any of them! If I was going to pick any, I’d love to do something like Wacken over in Europe and it would be cool to do a Download or something at home, but I don’t see it happening. It’s not something I really focus on. People have requested us at them all, but it falls at deaf ears, so I always say, come see us on the road, it’s far cheaper and much more personal!

So, what’s next for Kaine?

We’re going to blood Liam into the band, look to the future and record a fourth album. That’s it really, we’ll keep on going until there’s nothing left.

Well, thank you very much for your time. Is there anything else you would like to add before we finish?

Go and buy an unsigned bands CD this week! Any one will do! It will go a long way to helping that band push on, go to a gig this month that isn’t an established artist, get a t-shirt. Support the new generation! If people are yet to own our new record, it’s just £3 on digital or £10 on a CD. Vinyl is coming, so if you fancy helping an unknown band out, drop by our band camp and support our music!

Please note: Since this interview took place, guitarist Saxon Davids and bassist, Stephen Ellis, have also announced they are to leave the band. Please see the band’s website and Facebook page for announcements and press releases regarding this. We wish them all the very best of luck in the future.

SOCIAL MEDIA

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Dawn “The Metal Priestess” and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

 

Interview with Fallen Arise – Hammerfest X

logo

INTERVIEW WITH FALLEN ARISE
HAMMERFEST X
17/03/2018

Back in March, we had the pleasure of interviewing Gus, Giacomo and Fiona, of Fallen Arise, just after their set at Hammerfest X. They are an incredibly interesting band and it was really great talking to them about who they are and what they do.

For the people who have never seen you before, just give us a quick history of the band, who you are and where you come from.

Gus: Well, we are Fallen Arise. We are from three different countries; Greece, Italy and the UK. We were formed in 2009, the summer of 2009, and, of course, we had some other members those years. Now, we are Giacamo on guitars, Fiona on main vocals, Vlassis on main vocals, me on the keyboards. Marios K on the drums and Paul on the bass.

So, this band has two things that I love. I’m a keyboard player, so instantly I was like ‘Yay keyboards!’ I love bands with keyboard players!! And I’m a woman and I love women in metal. So, Fiona, how did you come to join the band first of all? Were you there from the beginning or have you been picked up recently?

Fiona: No, 2016, August. I received some communications from the management of Fallen Arise and we had some conversations and felt a good vibe and I enjoyed the music very much. Listening to the melodies and the orchestrations really grabbed me and I’d never actually played in a band with a keyboardist before, so I thought yes!

It makes a difference, doesn’t it? Adds a different level.

Fiona: Yeah, I played in a band with sequenced backing tracks but it didn’t have that live feel, so that was something that I really wanted to do, and also because there was a male vocalist too, again a new thing for me, I thought, yes absolutely. I signed up and we began a few tours.

29511764_412515515858127_9089597614010231362_n

So, how do you get around the whole rehearsal schedule thing?

Fiona: We don’t really rehearse (laughing)

Do you like do it over Skype? (laughing)

Giacomo: Usually we don’t (laughing)

So, you just learn all your bits separately and then just come together for a gig?

Fiona: Basically! We did get two rehearsals in Manchester as we all flew in last week, but we also had to prepare our acoustic show and we had never done anything like that before.

I guess it’s a very difficult thing to do acoustically.

Fiona: Yeah, and unfortunately for us as we were setting up, the keyboards failed so we had to very quickly rethink things the two of us and it was a little bit hairy. But, we got through it. We had fun.

Yeah, if you can get through it, that’s all that matters, isn’t it?

Fiona: It was good, I think people were enjoying it.

Giacamo: I was playing, thinking about the disparities, singing in my head…!

Fiona: We changed some things. We dropped a song, had to cut short things.

Giacamo: In a very short time we had to decide – ‘we are going to do this, this and this, ok’?

Fiona:  But it was good. So, we rehearsed, we did our lovely acoustic rehearsals in Manchester which no one ever got to hear! But sometimes if we can all go to Athens to do a couple of days rehearsals before we go to somewhere like Romania or somewhere like that, we try to do this, but it’s not always easy.

29512487_412515495858129_8635658180938213608_n

So, when it comes to playing gigs then, I’m assuming the rest of the guys get gigs in other parts of Europe, so you’re going all over the place to do gigs?

Fiona: Yeah, we are. (Agreement from the rest of the band)

So, what’s it like for you then? Is it amazing to get to these different places that you perhaps wouldn’t have gone to if you had not been in a band like this?

Fiona: Yes, it’s amazing, absolutely amazing. Fantastic. The biggest one I think for me last year, for all of us, was Russia, when we supported Paradise Lost! We got to some beautiful places, played to some fantastic audiences, they were absolutely wonderful to play to, really the passion and the energy is fantastic! So that was an amazing thing for us as a band and each, personally, as well. But earlier in the year, last year 2017, we did some tours through Germany, and The Netherlands, which was fantastic. Romania and Bulgaria too, and we played Greece last year as well! It’s been really nice to see all the fans.

The fans in Greece are magnificent. The metal scene in Greece is just fantastic. The fans out there are crazy.

Gus: The metal scene in Greece?

I think it’s crazy. You don’t think so?

Gus: No!!!

Really? You know, I’ve spoken to bands before and seen DVD’s of bands playing out in Greece. The crowds they get are just phenomenal.

Gus: Actually, the situation with Greece is that we have many, many talented musicians, many, many talented artists, but we have a bad ideology. It must be the music first, and it’s not. That’s the truth. Most people you will hear them say that my local scene is wonderful but it’s not.

So, do you prefer going to the rest of Europe and coming here?

Gus: Fallen Arise is more acceptable in other countries than Greece. It’s the truth. And that’s the reason we feel like home not in our real home but here in Wales, in Romania, in Russia, everywhere except our countries. I’m very sorry to say that but maybe in the Greek road I will be like an idiot but that’s the truth and I don’t care!! (Laughing)

It’s interesting, because we see obviously the media coverage and YouTube and things, so it’s interesting to hear it from your side because you’ve been there, you’ve come through that, the Greek side of things.

Gus: It’s the same for every country. If you are from the country, it’s harder to have an audience in your country because there is a sort of rivalry between musicians and this is absolutely something bad. I usually think about other musicians like brothers and I try to support them, but I heard also from people from abroad saying the same thing about their countries.

So, here in the UK, we are always going ‘oh the metal scene in Europe is so much better than it is here!’

Giacomo: I think everyone says the same thing!

02 Fallen Arise

So, Fiona, are you working towards some new material, a new album?

Fiona: Yeah, we are. The musical side, the composition side, has been finalised, and I actually fly to Athens in about a week to start in the studio for a few weeks doing final vocals, and we will finish up after that at Iron Queens Festival in Romania. So, it’s this one, lots of recording and then that! We are going to have a fantastic time! I believe, and I’ll have to double-check this, but I’m sure I read somewhere that the Iron Queens Festival in Romania is their first ever female fronted metal festival which I think is a really good thing.

I’m seeing more women in metal bands popping up all over the place and I think it’s fantastic, whether it’s singers, drummers, keyboardists, bass players, guitarists, you know, it’s really good. I’ve also been a massive fan of women in metal but you do get the people that go “hmmpft” Also, and I hate to say it but back in the 80’s, and I’m sure it still goes on a bit, females were in metal bands because they had been put there to look at, not to actually listen to the talent, and so it’s really nice now to see so many good female musicians come through and get respect. Has it opened doors for you, the fact that ladies in metal is much more accepted?

Fiona: I think so, and I think that some of the female fronted platforms across Europe added quite a powerful influence to that over the last decade but it’s becoming less and less needed. I think that’s why Female Voices in Metal decided to take a break, because they felt that the platforms weren’t perhaps necessary, whereas ten years ago it absolutely was! But, I think still there is a huge gap, there is a huge gender imbalance when you look at some of the bigger festivals. In time, I hope to see that change and I think it will.

So, what’s coming up for you guys now then? Obviously, you are going into the studio to record the album and you’ve got that festival. Have you got any other big dates planned for this year?

Fiona: We’ve got Iron Queens. We have another one in May.

Gus: We have another one in Romania on 9th June in Constanza, then we go to Sweden for new video. We are also playing in Italy. It’s not something we have confirmed but we are planning to do some dates in Italy.

Fiona: We concentrated on just a few festivals this year, because we have such a heavy job to do with our album, and our video, and our artwork, working with the label to get the album out by the end of the year so that take a lot of time and energy.

So, that’s what you are hoping for? A release date by the end of the year?

Fiona: We’re hoping so yeah, we’re confident it will be towards the end of the year.

Have you got any album title you can go by yet?

Fiona: Not presently no!

Is there going to be a theme about the album? You know is it going to be a concept, overall story, or are the songs going to be separate?

Fiona: In terms of lyrical themes, there’s a lot to do with passion, power, being reborn, feeling like there’s a shift into something better, so it’s a really positive album and it’s really reflective of coming out of harder times and going into something better. It’s that kind of thing. It’s that just get up and do something new, let’s be out there, let’s be passionate and powerful about what we believe in. That’s a lot of the lyrical themes so far. That’s about it.

Giacomo: Yeah it is separate songs, not a concept, but we also use symmetry with art, for example, we are using, for the first time in A Fallen Arise album, a seven-string guitar. We were trying to mix more thing together, seeing that we are from different worlds musically, so we try to combine to do something new.

You mention you are all from different musical worlds, what are your influences?

Giacomo: I come from thrash metal and progressive metal so when I joined the band it was hard for me, because I’ve never been a big fan of symphonic! But I found some characteristics which really were joyful for me. I think I have learnt very much from this band. Before I was thinking about songs like ‘alright, solos as fast as I can, I have to do this difficult riff, then I’ll change this!’ but now I have to serve the song and it’s something very, very, very beautiful. That happened to me, it completely changed my style!

It’s not all about heavy and fast, it’s about feeling the music.

Giacomo: Yeah, you have to serve the musicians and the audiences. This doesn’t sound so hard, but trust me it’s harder than playing many lines together, changing time etc.

Gus: I come from a classical background. Of course, I very much like metal music, all different bands, but not only metal music. As a musician, I have my ears open for every style. I like jazz, I like blues, I like everything. My main influences are the composers of classical music like Ravel, Stravinsky, Samberg, who were fascinating for me. Because of this, I chose to make this symphonic metal band. The idea of the frustration of the composer; taking a short theme and making it quite big, for a band, for an orchestra, for many, many, many people. It is fascinating. But, actually, generally I would say that I’m a fan and passionate about good music, wherever it comes from.

Fiona: For me, I grew up through the UK scene of classic metal and rock. Some of my influences stretch right back to the seventies, from things my parent where listening to, and I just picked up on. Things like Marillion and all sorts of stuff. A lot of that was quite influential to me, but as I sort of moved through the eighties, I got a lot of the classic rock influences as well. I was also a big fan of Iron Maiden; Bruce Dickinson especially is quite an interesting one for me. And you didn’t really get a lot of female vocalists to be honest. You know, Janis Joplin was pretty cool, I used to love her but, you know, unless it was pop – I think Madonna was one I used to dance around to when I was a kid! And Billy Joel apparently, I don’t really remember too much about that!! That’s the sort of stuff that’s come through for me. But, I’m also half Irish – lot of my family were born in Ireland, so we have a lot of that influence too. I think in the last ten, fifteen years, I think the female vocalists that have stepped out for me, I think were probably Christina Scabbia – I think she’s a pretty good performer as well as an exceptional vocalist; I do like the earlier Tarja stuff, I think she is a very, very talented vocalist. A bit of Nightwish, but I think Floor Jansen had a lot more variety for me and I think she’s got that power. I do like powerful singers, I really do. I listen to her a lot more now because I like her voice. But also, I think there are some really fantastic singers out there and it’s really hard sometimes to pick one that influenced you. I also like a lot of James LaBrie, Geoff Tate, people like that. It’s that kind of voice I think that grabs me.

Fantastic! Well that was our last question for this time – is there anything else you would like to add – anything you want everyone to know about?

Fiona: Yeah, the album. Iron Queens in Romania coming up in April, and obviously our new album coming out this year, that’s fantastic. So, do look out for that. But, also, you know, a huge thank you to everyone who’s given us time and support and interest. That’s everything for us.

Giacomo: And great hospitality!

Fiona: Hammerfest has been an amazing place to come to. Thank you so much.

And that was where we left it. It was incredibly interesting to chat to this quite remarkable band, and discover how the logistics of a multi – nation band works, and also how they see the metal world differently to us. It was fascinating and enthralling and I really hope we get chance to speak to the guys again at some point in the future. A massive thanks to them for taking the time out of their schedule to do this for us. Don’t forget to check them out, and keep an eye out for the new album – we are certainly excited for that!

SOCIAL MEDIA

https://fallenarise.bandcamp.com/

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Richard Tilley, Beth Jones and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to do adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities