WINO – Forever Gone

WINO – Forever Gone
Ripple Music
Release Date: 26/06/2020
Running Time: 46 mins
Review by Alun Jones
8/10

Who remembers that old TV programme, The Fall Guy? You know, the one where the Six Million Dollar Man becomes a stuntman/bounty hunter, getting into all kinds of daredevil scrapes whilst pursuing the bad guys? At the end of every episode, old Lee Majors (for it was he) would be seen chilling in his backyard hot tub, mulling over events whilst drinking a cold beer and smoking a big, fat cigar.

Well let it be known that I, too, like to relax in the tub with a beer after a long, hard day of whatever-the-fuck-it-is-I-do. None of your business, really. Just take it from me, I need to unwind in a mass of bubble bath, with candles and refreshment. And of course, some music, just to add to the ambience.

This might not sound very metal to you, but let me tell ya: this new album from doom metal originator Scott “Wino” Weinrich would make ideal tunes for chilling in the tub. Or pondering lost loves and fortunes in a dusty bar. Or sound tracking a lonely drive across the desert, escaping an inevitable encounter. But to be honest, I like the bathtub metaphor best, ‘cos I’ve not used it before.

‘Forever Gone’ is stripped down and intimate; the title song itself is just Wino the man, plus acoustic guitar. Beautifully melancholic, the listener can really get lost in this. ‘Taken’ also ploughs a lonesome path, with Wino’s voice revealing a soulfulness that I’d never appreciated before.

For any fans of The Obsessed or Saint Vitus who were hoping for something louder and more aggressive, there’s not too much of a leap from familiar ground really. Other than the sonics, the emotions of loss and despair are what unifies Wino’s other output to this endeavour. ‘Dark Ravine’ brings a more Americana style to the proceedings, but it’s all still intense as hell, whether the guitars are turned right up or not.

It’s not all gloom, though: ‘You’re So Fine’ introduces a laid back, country blues number that sounds almost boogie-ish. Throw in a great cover of Joy Division’s ‘Isolation’ and this is an album that’s certainly full of surprises.

Great music can create images in your head for your own movie; “Forever Gone” is one of those. Melodic yet mournful, intense and introspective, there are dozens of stories to be told within the grooves of this record.

TRACKLISTING:
01. Forever Gone
02. Taken
03. The Song’s at the Bottom of the Bottle
04. No Wrong
05. Dark Ravine
06. Dead Yesterday
07. You’re So Fine
08. Crystal Madonna
09. Lavender and Sage
010. Was Is and Shall Be
11. Isolation

LINKS:
www.facebook.com/ScottWeinrich/
www.twitter.com/scottweinrich
www.scottwinoweinrich.bandcamp.com/
www.open.spotify.com/artist/6vP6pVpKHwEFO4wX9eT4cv

www.ripple-music.com/
www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
www.ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
www.en.ripple.spkr.media/

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Alun Jones and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with RISE TO THE SKY

EMQ’s with RISE TO THE SKY

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Santiago, Chile based Atmospheric Doom Metal project Rise To The Sky. Huge thanks to main man Sergio for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

I’m Sergio, the sole member of “Rise to the Sky”. I play all instruments, sing vocals, and do the arrangements. This project was launched in December 2019, with my first album “Moonlight”, which was an experimental rollercoaster. I had many raw feelings I wanted to express through music, mainly about the past, therefore the songs from that album have different atmospheres and a lot of sudden changes, or just plain screaming at some parts. In 2020, I kept experimenting with different vocals styles and recording some singles, and finally came out with the EP “In the Grave of a Forgotten Soul”, which reflects the sound and atmosphere I was always looking for.

How did you come up with your band name?

The band name, Rise to the Sky, makes sense to me in many ways. It reflects the idea of your consciousness and humanity leaving the body when dying. The way you live your life, knowing you will eventually die and leave loved people behind, is a subject that is present in many of the songs.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

Chile is a metal country, there is a strong metal culture, and many bands of all metal sub-genres that play great music. You may also hear from many metal bands that have toured in Chile how great the fans are, we Chileans love the mosh pit!

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

My upcoming album “Death Will Not Keep Us Apart” will be released on October 9,2020 through the Russian label GS Productions. This is a very personal album; I created the whole concept for it while traveling away from my loved ones during a time of fear and uncertainty. When I arrived back home, I immediately started to write the music for the album, and I knew exactly that I needed to incorporate funeral/death doom elements to get the proper atmosphere for the album. The album is a full story about a couple in an apocalyptic world, which I really dreamed of and which reflects my thoughts on fearing death and loss.

Link to album:

https://risetothesky.bandcamp.com/album/death-will-not-keep-us-apart

Who have been your greatest influences?

I’ve always listened to doom metal, My Dying Bride, Woods of Ypres, Shape of Despair, and Celestial Season in the early days, have been my greatest influence in terms of making music in this genre.

However, not all my influences are doom metal, I get many ideas from classical music. Bach compositions and structures are a great source of learning and inspiration and Wagner operas, his leitmotivs and complexity of characters such as Wotan or Tristan are something that cannot be overlooked. You should not be surprised to identify some dramatic/operatic elements in my albums.

What first got you into music?

I’m not much of a talker, and I’ve always though music was a way of expressing myself without words. I’ve always played music, but I’ve had trouble finding people interested in the music I wanted to make. When I started to listen to one-man bands like Unreqvited, Violet Cold and A Fall of Every Season, I knew that it was possible to make great music on my own, those bands were my inspiration to start everything.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Right now, I really could not be more satisfied with the current collaborations I have. I am working with two amazing artists, Filippos Koliopanos, from the band Ocean of Grief, and Gogo Melone, design artist and singer and composer from the band Aeonian Sorrow.  Filippos is doing all my post-production, he is an amazing musician, and knows all about mix-mastering and getting the right sounds, we are always talking about how to improve the music and how to move forward with the project. Gogo Melone did all the artwork for the album, she knew exactly how to translate the concept and ideas into astonishing graphics.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

I honestly prefer any small gig that is more intimate and that focuses in getting the proper sound quality.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

I cannot recall any weird gift, but my most precious gifts are all the messages and comments I get in social media. People have been overwhelmingly positive and enthusiastic with the music. I constantly get good comments and reviews from people all around the world. The doom metal community is really a great one.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Try to put all your energy and humanity into and artistic expression, whatever it is, Thank You for your constant support, and most importantly, stay Doom!

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Peter Steele without a doubt, Type o Negative is one of the greatest bands ever, in my opinion he was a music pioneer, created a unique sound, and delivered a brilliant set of recordings. I would have loved to see what he would have done afterwards.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

The best part is music has no real boundaries anymore, nowadays you can easily share the music for the whole world to hear with just an upload. The bad thing is that is difficult to make a living out of music, there are many talented musicians, that have put incredible amounts of effort and their whole soul into their music and that are struggling.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

I feel that a part of the music industry is focused more in gaining a profit than in delivering good quality music, and sometimes they overload the music channels with the same stuff over and over, so fans don´t really know much about other bands than the usual ones. Luckily enough, the doom metal community is much more diverse, and I think there is room for many types of projects and styles, and honestly I don’t think many doom metal bands are in this for the money which makes it great for the quality of the music.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Celestial Season – “Solar Lovers”. In my opinion, doom metal at its finest. This album marked my whole existence, it is genius in many ways, compositions, sounds, and instrumentation, the drumming is one of the best I’ve heard.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

I love cassettes, they have sentimental value to me, but now I like to hear my metal very loud, so it needs to be CD´s or Downloads.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Unfortunately, no live playing for one-man bands so far…who knows in the future…I already have people interested in joining the band.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I would be wandering around the world, going to metal festivals, and just enjoying every gig I could go to.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Heike Langhans, Amelie Nothomb, Mia Wallace, Fred Armisen, and Michael Scott.

What’s next for the band?

I am already writing new music to deliver new releases in the future.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.RisetotheSkyBand.com
www.RisetotheSky.bandcamp.com
www.youtube.com/channel/UCyF4UUetgmfKTdbZHMS1HKA
www.open.spotify.com/artist/25HKbngvl5yZ7y1RCG5Vs0
www.facebook.com/RisetotheSkyBand

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Never had one, if I were to guess by looking at it, sounds like a fancy name for a biscuit…

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Check out the album and reach out to me on social media, I am always interested in talking to fellow musicians and doom metal lovers!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with RITUAL EARTH

EMQ’s with RITUAL EARTH

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Philadelphia, PA based Space Doom Stoner Metal band Ritual Earth. Huge thanks to drummer Chris Turek and vocalist George Chamberlin for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Chris: I am Chris from Ritual Earth and I smash drums. Ritual Earth evolved from the ashes of our previous band Chimpgrinder. As we developed a more progressive style, George joined on vocals to compliment the band, and we needed a new name, but continued and expanded the ethos of our prior writing subjects.

George: I’m George, I sing. I recall listening to Chimpgrinder’s “Simian Space King” and thinking how much I’d love to add melodic vocals over something similar to that. A year later, they wrote me on Facebook based off a recommendation from Erik Caplan of Thunderbird Divine. We’ve been Ritual Earth now since March-ish of 2018.

How did you come up with your band name?

Chris: Ritual Earth evokes the tribal and rhythm depths of space and time.

George: Our bass player, Chris Scott had originally come up with it. There was a combination of ideas as to what it represented, tying in previous lyrical themes with the new evolution of music and storytelling we were developing.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

Chris: We reside in the greater Philadelphia area. Prior to Covid we had a decent local scene, a nice collective of local bands, and touring bands.

George: There are so many great bands in the Philly area as well as venues to choose from. Philly is also a hot spot for touring bands, being between NYC and Baltimore or DC, so a lot of bigger bands come through which helps our local scene out tremendously. There is also a really strong punk rock to metal or doom crossover here as well. It’s not uncommon to meet someone at a doom show only to realize ya met before 10 or 15 years ago at a warehouse punk rock squat.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

Chris: Our latest is an independently recorded and released full length album titled “MMXX”.  Available September 1, 2020 at

https://ritualearth.bandcamp.com/

Who have been your greatest influences?

Chris: You name it, I am influenced by everything, for drums, Don Brewer from early Grand Funk days, Rich Hoak is a drumming hero, and the obvious choices, Bonham, Ward, Baker, Mitch Mitchel, Krupa, etc…

George: Vocally speaking, Ozzy and Chris Cornell are the two big ones that have stuck with me. When I was younger, regardless of how heavy the music was, I always gravitated towards the more melodic singers of their respected genres; Joey Belladonna, Bobby Blitz Ellsworth, Eric Wagner, John Garcia, Eddie Sutton, hell even Vince Neil to name a few. I am also a huge Voivod fan and occasionally I do hear a Snake influence on my vocals as well if not lyrically.

What first got you into music?

Chris: Back in the day, a ZZ Top tape and a Walkman. It’s just grown from there.

George: Music was in my life at an early age. My mother sang in a country band when I was very young, so I grew up thinking that music is just something that what we did. What really hit me though was listening to the Misfits for the first time and watching that “Why Be Something You’re Not” videotape. All of that energy and tension with the band and crowd, that’s when I realized this is what I really wanted to do.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Chris: For this record we collaborated by introducing keys by Mark Boyce, I would love to do that again and record and develop something really crazy.

George: I always wished I could’ve taken part in one of the Desert Sessions, just seems like a great time and a lot of creativity going on. That being said, I’d love to see or do something similar with any of our local musicians or bands here in the Philly area.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Chris: Wacken of course. Does it really need explanation?

George: Psycho Las Vegas, it just sounds like an adventure.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

George: Nothing weird or crazy for me, there was one time someone came to a show and gave me a shirt from my very first band because I had said to a mutual friend that I didn’t have one. I thought that was pretty cool.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Chris: Share our music, give it away, spread the word!

George: Music is an art, and a very personal one at that. There is no right or wrong way to go about it.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

George: I’m not sure I’d want to bring anyone back as I fear it could ruin their legacy, but if I had to choose, I think it’d have to be Randy Rhoades. I’m betting the Ozzy output would have remained consistently stellar and I’d be very curious to see what else Randy could do with a guitar.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Chris: When you’re playing music, nothing else exists. There is nothing to hate about being a musician.

George: Most, that feeling you get when the band is performing, and everyone locks in and you start to flow together and become one supernatural unit. There is no drug that can give you that feeling. Hate? I dunno, hate’s a strong word. I think what I dislike the most is when our craft isn’t respected.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Chris: Find the next Led Zeppelin! We need some big talented bands heard again.

George: One thing…I just wish the motivation 100% of the time was for the love of music, nothing more.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Chris: I can’t speak for the others in the band, and hard to pick favourites, but Brutal Truth’s “Sounds Of The Animal Kingdom” never lets me down.

George: Soundgarden – “Badmotorfinger”

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Chris: I really like Vinyl, but digital is an obvious choice for ease of consumption.

George: Vinyl sounds the best and it will always remind me of being a kid and going through a layout looking at the pictures, reading the lyrics and notes as the record spins. I feel there is a special connection to a record and band when you have a physical format that a digital download just doesn’t offer. Digital however is easier to travel with, but that’s where it ends for me.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Chris: I like any gig where we can be loud and make noise. Playing shows with heroes and legends like Corrosion of Conformity, or Wino is always great.

George: The last Ritual Earth show at Century Bar in Philly. It was where everything clicked before we started to record, everything really felt right, we were tight as shit and confidence was at an all-time high. I felt that our set that night was flawless, everything and everyone was “on”.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

Chris: I would be an astronaut, space explorer, surfing the waves of mental impulse and floating further away from myself.

George: I’d probably be playing more “dad softball”, haha. I will say though, playing music keeps me feeling young.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Chris: No one, I prefer to be a hermit in the mountains or the solitude of outer space.

George: Bret Hart, Randall Cunningham, Henry Rollins, Gary Oldman and Jon Stewart.

What’s next for the band?

Chris: Hunker down and lock into more writing until things open up again.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.ritualearth.bandcamp.com/
www.facebook.com/RitualEarthDoom/
www.instagram.com/ritualearthdoom/

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Chris: What the hell are Jaffa cakes?

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Chris: Spread the word, Ritual Fucking Earth!

George: Thank you for all that you do!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with RIVER OF SOULS

EMQ’s with RIVER OF SOULS

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Netherlands based DeathDoom band, River Of Souls. Huge thanks to guitarist Paul Beltman for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Hi, I’m Paul, guitarist in River of Souls. River Of Souls started as a project band in 2014 consisting of Bart (vocals) , Benjamin (bass guitar), and me on guitars and drums. In 2017 we released our debut full length titled “The Well Of Urd’. Since then, we have released an EP and a digital streaming single, and recently we released our 2nd full length album titled “Usurper”. Nowadays we aren’t a project band anymore, we have played a few shows and once the Covid19 stuff is over, we will play more shows. The current line-up is Bart on vocals, Mathijs and me on guitar and Koen on drums. Sadly, Benjamin quit playing recently, but we have a temporary bass player to fill the gap.

How did you come up with your band name?

Initially we had the name Fateweaver, but then we noticed there was another band with the same name. So, Bart came up with a truckload of possible band names, River Of Souls was the name we felt fitted the lyrics of the debut album best.

What country are you from and what is the metal/rock scene like there?

We’re from The Netherlands, the scene here is fairly good. There are many excellent bands here, and there are also a lot of venues to play at. However, the Dutch metal scene for some reason seems to be fonder of foreign bands than Dutch bands. Which I find strange, there are many really good bands here.

What is your latest release (Album, EP, Single, Video)

Our latest release is the full-length album “Usurper”, which gets many really positive reviews and other feedback from all over the world. We’re currently investigating a few options for distribution in the US and Europe.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Even though I’m trying to ‘steal’ the ideas from all kinds of genres, I think the first metal bands that I listened to, and that have convinced me to pick up an instrument, have influenced me most when it comes to composition.  So, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Slayer, Helloween, Annihilator, and I think Morbid Angel should also be mentioned. Not saying we sound like any of those bands though, hahaha!

What first got you into music?

Well, the bands that I just mentioned are the ones that convinced me to become a musician. Especially Iron Maiden, Metallica, and Slayer.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Hahaha, dreams, dreams, dreams! Well, there are many people of whom I’d be honoured if they would be willing to appear as a guest musician on a future River Of Souls album. To name a few : Aaron Stainthorpe, James Murphy, Mike Wead, Devin Townsend, Andy LaRocque, Michael Denner, Hank Shermann, Frank Mullen, Steve Vai, etcetera.

On the composing side, I think collaborating with someone like Adrian Smith or Steve Harris, Lars Ulrich, Andrew Craighan, Jeff Waters, or Anders Nyström, would be something really interesting for me.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Eeehhhhh…Graspop Metal Meeting in Belgium, I think. Why? Because I usually only see really big and well-known bands there, hahaha. But I’d also settle with Wacken Open Air, Dynamo Metal Fest, Fortarock, or any other big open-air festival…hahaha. I don’t think we ever will reach such status!

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

That was with a band I played in in the past : a bracelet, from a cook in a venue in Poland. He was immensely intrigued by our performance; he gave me his silver bracelet as a thanks for the show!

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Eehhhh…’Peace! and respect each and every one !’ Or something like that. I’m actually some kind of modern metal-Hippie.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Ronnie James Dio! And in case I have resurrected his soul myself, I’d command him to make a new record with Black Sabbath (Iommi/Butler/Ward). And he has to sing a few lines on a future River Of Souls album of course, hahaha!

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

I actually enjoy playing live the most. And by that, I mean playing, meeting people and talking to fellow musicians, and usually I find travelling also cool. What I hate, aside handling much heavy equipment, as that playing in a band isn’t just making music. In my case, and just temporary, River Of Souls is currently more like 5% playing/composing. All the other work is promotion, production, management, social media, etcetera, etcetera. But it is what it is, without the additional stuff, no one will check out the music, no shows will be booked, no albums will be made.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

The end of music through the internet…but that will piss many people off I guess…?

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

“Master of Puppets” by Metallica.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

All is fine by me, as long as the musician gets paid an honest fee. (not talking about myself here, I’m saying this for the musicians that try to make a living with their art). Spotify and such services are killing the indie artist, and also the need for an album. In case you want to be fruitful on the streaming market, you’d better release many singles instead of a single release of an album…Also, on streaming, people usually check a single track, instead of a complete album. In our case, chances are high that people listen to 1 or 2 of our tracks, and don’t get a proper impression of our sound. We make albums that have multiple faces, and those albums make a musical journey. If you heard only 1 single song, you cannot say you’ve heard our music.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

With River Of Souls ? That would be Dutch Doom Days 2018.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

The same as I’m doing now: Full time job, and a family life. But then with more time for my other hobby’s, which are all kinds of technical stuff. Wood, metal, home improvement, electronics, etcetera.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

My best friends! Michael, Peter, Ingmar, Jacco, Ferry, and Benjamin.  That’s 6…. Well, all or none.

What’s next for the band?

There’s a lyric video coming up for ‘A Spirit’s Weight’, we consider to release one of the bonus tracks of the CD on the streaming services later this year, and, we’re also preparing our drummer’s rehearsal room for recording, so, we might do a live studio set for youtube, or, we’ll start around October 2020 with the recording of a new EP, or something similar.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.riverofsouls.nl/
www.facebook.com/riverofsoulsband/
www.riverofsouls.bandcamp.com/
www.youtube.com/channel/UChSwGREYDEUw9AMhk0dE_Nw
www.open.spotify.com/artist/4YTY52z5Uietm2rBUhhvel

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Hahahaha! Definitely cakes. They’re too soft to be called a biscuit, imho!

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thank you for this interview! And in case people check us out, please take the time to experience the complete “Usurper” album. Thanks!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with CULT BURIAL

EMQ’s with CULT BURIAL

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with London, UK based Death/Black/Doom Metal project Cult Burial. Huge thanks to Simon for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

I’m Simon, I write the music and play guitars, bass and drums. I produce and mix the tracks too. The band started in March 2020, when I drunkenly bought a baritone guitar. I made of couple of tracks and released a 2-track EP called “Sorrow”. Four months later there was a full album, which is out in November 2020.

How did you come up with your band name?

It just sounded heavy. I wanted a name that when you hear it, you immediately have a good idea what the music sounds like.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

I’m from London. I’m not part of any metal scene, but every band on the planet comes here pretty regularly, so it’s a damn good place to be to watch music and check out bands.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

Cult Burial’s self-titled debut album is out on 6 November 2020. It’s 9-tracks of crushing heaviness and vicious vocals.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Sepultura got me listening to heavier stuff. I loved the “Roots” album when I was a kid and Max’s vocals in particular. After that I started seeking out heavier bands. I go through phases of listening to death metal and black metal (I’m currently in a black metal phase), but listen to lots of other stuff, I’m a huge Massive Attack and Portishead fan too….so influences come from plenty of places.

What first got you into music?

Some guys in my school could play instruments and I walked in on them playing a cover of Nirvana’s ‘Aneurysm’. I knew I wanted to do the same, so I bought a cheap guitar and locked myself in a room until I could play a chord, which took far longer than it should have.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

There’s so many bands that I really enjoy and appreciate their work and I’m constantly looking for new albums and new sounds from heavy artists…but I wouldn’t want to collaborate with any of them, I just like to do my thing. I get to self-conscious too collaborate.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Party.San always looks like it has a fine line up.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Honestly, bar a couple of odd emails, nobody has ever sent me shit. Send me weird stuff, people.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

You, yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection. I didn’t come up with that, though.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Kurt Cobain.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Writing and mixing music. I like everything about it: the process, experimenting, the joy of getting it right and the frustration of constantly fucking it up. What do I hate? I’ve never enjoyed playing live, sadly.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

What can you change? It’s a product of the demand for music that exists at any one time. I have nothing I would want to or have the ability to change.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Deftones’ “White Pony”. Not very heavy but the atmosphere in that record is insane.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Vinyl for the feel and the artwork. CD’s because I can put them in alpha-chronological order and that makes me very happy. Downloads for convenience.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Cult Burial doesn’t play live, and has no plans to currently.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I’d be looking ponderously out of a window, contemplating the meaning of life, day after day after day.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Bill Murray, Jurgen Klopp, Morgan Freeman, Bill Bailey, Frankie Boyle.

What’s next for the band?

The album is out 6 November, and a single from the album called ‘Dethroner’ will be out in October.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.facebook.com/cultburial/

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

That’s a tax question. I’m not the taxman. However, I will say this: a Jaffa Cake should be eaten in one whole mouthful.

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with RAZOR SHARP DEATH BLIZZARD

EMQ’s with RAZOR SHARP DEATH BLIZZARD

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Selkirk, Scotland based Groove Metal/Sludge/Doom band Razor Sharp Death Blizzard. Huge thanks to vocalist Jamie Clark for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

I’m Jamie Clark and I am the vocalist Razor Sharp Death Blizzard. Daz McSwell is on vocals and guitar, Ross Corbett on bass and Liam Roberts on drums. We began in 2014 with Greg on drums and Graham on bass when we started to jam in an old WW2 incendiary bomb munitions plant. There would literally be icicles hanging from the ceiling in winter and would be a hot box in the summer but that’s where the “Riot Revolt Revolution” E.P. was written and unleashed in 2015. We moved to another space in Selkirk, Scottish Borders where we still are now and wrote our first album “You Will Burn” and recorded it with Chris Fielding at Skyhammer Studio near Chester which we released in 2017. Greg left after the album was released to concentrate on Uni. Enter Liam Roberts on drums. Not long after, Graham left too so he could further his career. Enter Ross Corbett on bass. Throughout this time, we have played all over the UK, mainland Europe and Ireland. We are now a stable band and love hitting the road and playing all over. At the end of 2019 we recorded a new album with Chris Fielding again but at Foel Studio this time and it was released on 17/07/20 called “The World Is Fucked”

How did you come up with your band name?

Our name came from something our original drummer said after walking through a snow blizzard. He said the snow was fucking brutal and that it was like walking through a Razor Sharp Death Blizzard. The rest is history.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We are based in a little town called Selkirk in The Scottish Borders, where the metal scene sadly is non-existent. The closest place is Edinburgh, about an hour’s drive away, where the scene is thriving thanks to some great venues like Banshee Labyrinth, Bannermans and Henrys Cellar used by awesome promoters.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

We had a single, ‘Suicide’ out on 14/05/20 which is from the album “The World Is Fucked” released on 17/07/20.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Probably my Mum, everyone in the band and the amazing people around us.

What first got you into music?

I was always into music one way or another. Singing in the choir at school, my mum playing Joe Cocker and Joan Baez, friends lending me Marillion, Iron Maiden, AC/DC. I was obsessed with Iron Maiden for years; I have about everything they released up to Seventh Son.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Bongripper and add some vocals to Satan Worshipping Doom

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Roadburn Festival in the Netherlands. I’ve been going the past few years and it has the best vibe best people and there’s always a curveball that captures you. A lot of the music I’ve discovered the past few years has been from Roadburn.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Not sure about gifts but we were given ‘Special’ beer from a fan at a festival in Switzerland one time. Fuck knows what was in it, but we were fucked after it.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Look out for one another xx

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Chris Cornell.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

The most I enjoy is playing shows in new and old places and chewing the fat with old and new friends. The thing I dislike most is the thankless task of trying to contact promoters to try and organise shows, it can get pretty demoralising.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

In the UK and many other countries, it would be great to see some sort of government support of venues. Too many great places are closing.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Iron Maiden – “Piece Of Mind”

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

For me CD’s work best as I can put them on in my van. Vinyl is great to have and hold.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

That’s a tough one, too many to choose. Let’s say Urban Assault Festival in Cork, Ireland 2019

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I’m one half of a Construction business so probably putting more effort into that rather than being distracted by the bright lights.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Daz, Liam and Ross from the band, Luke Wolftired who played second guitar on the last Irish shows and Father Dave for the craic!

What’s next for the band?

Promoting the new single and album, then get out on the road ASAP once all the Covid-19 restrictions are lifted.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Bandcamp, Spotify, Apple Music etc. etc.

www.facebook.com/deathblizzardband/
www.instagram.com/razorsharpdeathblizzard/
www.razorsharpdeathblizzard.bandcamp.com/

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Cake but I eat them like a biscuit.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thanks for the interview and we look forward to seeing you and everyone else as soon as we can. We hope you enjoy the new single and album. Take care and look after one another.
Peace
Jamie xx

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with YANOMAMO

EMQ’s with YANOMAMO

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Sydney, Australia based Sludge-Ridden Doom Metal band, Ya̧nomamö. Huge thanks to guitarist Jason Higson for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

I’m Jason & I play guitar in Ya̧nomamö. The band began in 2011 as a side-project as we were all playing in other bands (Lomera, Mother Mars, Rituals of the Oak, Birdmouth). Almost 10 years and a couple of line-up changes later, and we are still going! We call our music SLUDGERIDDENDOOM and try to deliver the biggest riffs we can conjure, whilst maintaining swing & groove.

How did you come up with your band name?

We took it from the movie Cannibal Holocaust, though it is actually the name of a small group of indigenous people who live in villages in the Amazon rainforest on the border between Venezuela and Brazil.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We are from Sydney, Australia. The scene here is pretty busy with lots of great underground metal bands of all genres working hard to produce great music.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

We’ll be releasing our new EP, “No Sympathy for a Rat” in August 2020. It’s our first release in 3 years & we are really keen to get it out!

Who have been your greatest influences?

For the music we create in Ya̧nomamö, I’d have to say Black Sabbath, Bongzilla, Church of Misery … I’d also include early KISS, in particular Ace Frehley, & Thin Lizzy from an overall perspective.

What first got you into music?

My father & my uncles introduced me to 70’s hard rock e.g. Thin Lizzy, KISS, AC/DC etc from a very young age. Music has been my passion ever since.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Bongzilla or Church of Misery.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Probably Roadburn … the line-ups are amazing year after year

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Nothing springs to mind…

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

We appreciate the support we get from our fans more than anything. Without the fans, we dont exist.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Honestly, nobody…

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Playing live shows is the greatest thing for me. I also love the creative process, but it can also be very stressful at times. It’s a double-edged sword, especially from a mental health perspective.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Like almost everything else, it would be the politics…

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Thin Lizzy – “Johnny The Fox”

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Vinyl! Music isn’t something you just download from the internet. I love the artwork & packaging which contributes to the overall musical package.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

It’s hard to narrow it down… but a couple stick out… Coven Festival at Crowbar in Sydney 2017 was really great. Also Playing The Tote in Melbourne at capacity with Conan was probably the highlight.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

My day job in project management! Hahahaha… being a musician isn’t a full-time thing for any of us. We all have families & jobs etc. but we do this because we love it.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Kobe Bryant, Gregg Popovich, Tony Iommi, Ace Frehley, Barack Obama

What’s next for the band?

Releasing the “No Sympathy for a Rat” EP in August & playing lots of shows to support it!

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.yanomamo.bandcamp.com/
www.facebook.com/yanomamoband/
www.instagram.com/yanomamo_sludge_ridden_doom/

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

I don’t care either way… they are choc/orange deliciousness!!!

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thank you for your time & for being a part of the metal underground. We really appreciate it!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Johan Längquist of Candlemass

Interview with Johan Längquist of Candlemass
By Sheri Bicheno

Good Afternoon Readers!

When this interview landed on the list, I jumped at the chance to nail it! Candlemass are undoubtedly one of the most influential Doom bands out there, helping shape the Doom genre into what it is from when they started out over 30 years ago!

Candlemass released their first full length album since 2012, “The Door To Doom”, in February 2019 which features Toni Iommi on track ‘Astorolous – The Octopus’. This album is the first to feature Johan since “Epicus Doomicus Metalllicus” in 1986!

For all you fellow Doom lovers, I’d be interested in what your opinions are on the newest EP, “The Pendulum” that has been released in this chaotic time of life. Give it a go and let us know what you think!

I recently got the chance to have a Skype chat with vocalist Johan Längquist and I have to say, it was an absolute pleasure. Humble, often with a chuckle in his voice and an all-around nice guy!

I sat down, with a cheery bounce and proceeded to call Johan’s Skype ID and await…

“Hi! Johan here!” says a very cheerful voice on the other end. I’m beaming already.

We exchange greetings and introductions and immediately, I sense the smile in his voice.

Sheri: Candlemass are known for being the epitome of the Doom genre – What I find interesting is that there are fewer bands from the 80’s era that explore that genre of metal. What prompted Candlemass to find your technique and essentially be part of creating the way for Doom Metal?

Johan: I think that we were so very influenced by music that was made in the 80’s and as you probably know, Leif is a big fan of Black Sabbath…and I think that is the main reason it all started. Of course, I’m too a great fan of Black Sabbath but I like a lot of other bands from that era too. So, I think that’s the main reason the way how it turned out the way it did, and the way Leif is writing the music because you know, he writes all the songs. And I know he is a BIG fan of Black Sabbath haha.

Sheri: So, they’re kind of an influence for you?

Johan: Yeah, yeah! We haven’t talked that much about it but that must be the reason haha! I think that Black Sabbath were one of the bands that almost sounded like that in the 80’s I think, there were not that many bands, there were a couple of bands, but not that many.

Sheri: Not as few, Black Sabbath kicked off the Doom side so it’s interesting to see how the genre has evolved. Did you have to experiment with your sound technique or – as you just said, you were influenced, did you have a particular vibe that you wanted to go with or did you need to experiment with technique?

Johan: When I got into the band and we did the album in 1986, I had a tape a couple of weeks before we went into the studio. So, you know, I did vocals and I just had to find my way into that music haha! Yeah, it’s pretty much as simple as that. Sometimes, you know, when you’re about to do a song and do the vocals, you can’t find your way in, but I guess that’s the job that all the singers have to do, find their way into the music to give the music the right vocals, the right spirit, to suit the music, I think. That’s what I did. And I remember in my opinion at that time, I had my own band at that time and I thought it was a bit how you say monotone… the same chord, a very long tune, so I remember that I was thinking about doing the vocals as melodic as possible. You know?

Sheri: Sure. So, it’s a change for that sort of era.

Johan: Absolutely yes.

Sheri: How do you feel being a great influencing Artist for other bands within Doom? As we discussed, Doom has been expanded on within the last sort of 20 to 30 years with different sub genres.

Johan: There’s so many genre’s around right now, I don’t know them all haha! To me, it’s Heavy Metal. Slow Heavy Metal or not. Dark Heavy Metal haha.

Sheri: Haha! It does change quite a bit.

Johan: You know, when we are out playing and sometimes people are coming into where we playing and tell us “The reason we started was because of you guys” Then of course you feel honoured that you’ve been a big inspiration for many musicians in that genre, so yeah, what can you say? It’s an honour. It’s humbling.

Sheri: I’ve asked a couple of our readers if they have any questions for you…

Johan: Great! Haha.

Sheri: One of the questions raised by Jimmy, is that A lot of younger bands cite you as a massive influence upon them, as we just discussed, is that a help or sometimes a comfort for you to know that after all this time, Candlemass has stayed relevant without losing focus of what essentially makes Candlemass what it is?

Johan: Yes of course, something tells you that you’ve done the right thing in life. At least some good things in life if your music lives on and other people get the inspiration listening to the older album – it’s fantastic. Life is a tough one and that’s for sure a good thing to do haha. I’m not that kind of guy. But you know, it takes work and sometimes you succeed and sometimes you don’t and it’s a lot of work going on all the time.

Sheri: Happiness does take work sometimes! Casting back to when you were working on “Epicus Doomicus Metallicus”, did you face any surprises or challenges? As it was different from anything made before.

Johan: When I got the tape from the guys, I had actually never heard anything like that before. I thought “wow, how can I find my way into this?” That was the feeling I had when I started listening to the songs and trying to learn them. But it was a lot of fun doing them because there were no limits when we went to the studio and uh… well… we had a lot of fun I can tell you! Haha.

Sheri: Haha! Tell no secrets! That leads me onto the next question… what were the best memories of creating that album and then going forward after you re-joined Candlemass?

Johan: Haha! What I remember is a guy that came to the studio and he was asking “Where is the singer?” And then he saw me and said “Oh…it’s you?” He was expecting a big guy, very tall and big, because he thought… my sound was like… he was looking around, walking by me going “Where is he? Where is he? The new singer!” Hahaha. And I was “It’s me” and he was “Oh!” I don’t know if he was disappointed or just surprised, I don’t know hahaha!

Sheri: Let’s hope it’s the latter! Hahaha! And what about after you re-joined?

Johan: When we went into the studio for “Door to Doom”, Marcus Jidell was producing the album and it was the first time I heard the songs. I was pretty amazed, and you know, we had a discussion before I listened to the songs and they asked if I would be interested in joining the band again. I said of course… but I need to listen to the songs and see if they thrill me haha. And they did! It was a good experience for me because you know, I had to sing so very hard and high, I’m not what you would call a high pitch singer so I had to push myself a lot to sing the songs on the album, not every single one as you can hear, I’m pretty distorted… haha… when I’m crying out loud to do the songs… But it was a lot of fun you know. When you’re into the music in the 80’s, I really do like Rob Halford and Dio and all the great singers at that time, you know to push yourself and do the maximum you know. I like that.

Sheri: I think that’s how a lot of successful people have carved their way. By pushing boundaries and adjusting, as you have done. You do have an incredibly big voice, so it works.

Johan: Yeah and I think I have found some parts in my vocals that I haven’t found before at that point actually, because of all the pushing haha. It was a great experience as a singer, now I know pretty much that there are no limits, you just do your very best. Of course, there are limits but maybe you can do it better than you believe yourself, just give it a really good shot.

Sheri: And that’s how people learn isn’t it! It’s good to have your vocals back with Candlemass as shown in your latest full-length album, “Door to Doom” This is your first album back with Candlemass after a long time. What did it mean to you as a musician to get behind the wheel of Candlemass? It was very positive, but did you have any visions of the future when you joined? Have you got plans?

Johan: Thank you! Haha. Even though I hadn’t been in Candlemass for those years, I have always been involved in music in one way or another all my life. So, it felt pretty natural for me to do all this. But of course, you never know what happens you know, if people are going to like the album or not? But fortunately, it all turned out very well and I’m so happy for that haha. I was very nervous the very first gig we did back together you know, because I hadn’t been on stage at that time for a very long time but it all turned out very well, I felt that, yeah, it works!

Sheri: I did see some footage of that first gig and it was absolutely rammed! I think you had no worries there haha.

Johan: Haha thank you!

Sheri: Another of our readers, Sam, has asked… The Door to Doom is very much old school Doom. In the vein of the first or early Candlemass records, how do you feel they hold in comparison to the more recent or modern bands and other albums of this generation, for example when playing a festival bill full of newer bands, to a new generation of fans who might not have been around in the Epicus Doomicus Metallicus days or hadn’t heard of Candlemass?

Johan: Ah what can I say? To me, it’s just like, you know it’s the same with Leif and the other guys, I’m so stuck in the 80’s and all the great songs that were done at that time and I listen to a lot of new musicians too and they’re so fantastic – but I think you need to have a relationship with the 80’s to find the 80’s spirit. I’d been playing for a couple of years with a young man, only 30 years old haha, before Candlemass happened, he was very interested in learning the spirit of the 80’s and was a very good guitar player – but it’s the way you play guitar and the way you do the songs. I can’t exactly say what it is, but I think there is something with the 80’s that one should learn from I think haha.

Sheri: I think so too. I think the 70’s and 80’s, I mean all decades have had their good run of music… it’s different.

Johan: Of course we have a special relationship with the 80’s because we were young at that time but even these days when you listen to the songs… yeah… My heart feels good when I hear good music hahaha!

And of course, there are so many brilliant bands out there right now too. But the problem is that there are so many bands, you can’t find them all. I’m an old fashioned guy, I don’t hardly use my computer – of course I do, but sometimes I used to sit watching YouTube looking for new bands but there are so many and I don’t’ know exactly how to steer into the very best bands.

Sheri: It’s very social media based at the moment isn’t it?

Johan: Yeah and I know that you can always listen – but the problem is they never play the good bands on radio, of course a couple do but they never play their best songs in my opinion haha.

Sheri: I agree with you. I think it tends to be what’s in the NOW you know…

Johan: Yeah, a good example is ‘I Was Made For Lovin’ You’ with KISS and that’s pretty much the only song that they play with KISS and they did great songs before that haha.

It’s the same with Van Halen – what’s do you hear from Van Halen for example?

Both: ‘Jump’!

Johan: Hahaha, exactly! In my opinion, that’s not the best song they did haha. Of course, it’s good but I don’t know if they’re giving Van Halen the right… how do you say?

Sheri: Like a light shone on them really for people of the younger generation. I understand.

Johan: (Chuckles) Exactly!

Sheri: Candlemass have just released an EP in March of this year, “The Pendulum”. Which, in the middle of a Pandemic, is greatly welcomed!

For Artists to keep doing what they’re doing and making and releasing music if they can, is needed. There are a lot of Artists at the moment that probably, like yourself, that have to be on pause to an extent and its quite frustrating… but we have to keep rolling with the punches!

Some of the songs on the EP are noted as Unreleased Demos. Can you take us through the history of some of the demos? Are some of them quite new?

Johan: Hahaha! Ah when I did the Door to Doom, I didn’t know about these songs!

Sheri: Ah!

Johan: No! Hahaha. I had no idea that there were more songs. They told me a couple of weeks after we released The Door To Doom – they thought that they were not done in the right way and wanted to make a few changes and do another lot vocals on it… and I was surprised when I heard the songs and I said, “Wow, why?” They were great songs! And we re-recorded them again, I don’t know exactly what they changed about them, but I know some guitars and the vocals… that was for sure a tough one for me to do too. But a lot of fun doing those songs I can tell you haha.

Sheri: How do you think Candlemass has evolved after around 35 years of music? As I say, you are still quite true to your sound, during those almost 36 years, how do you think you have made evolutionary changes within the band?

Johan: I think that the only things you can do is… if you have the chance, if you’re allowed to do the songs and write songs the way you want to, that’s the main reason that you can develop in different directions. But we love the music in that time and that’s what gives us the most if you compare us to other kinds of music. I think that’s the main reason and we don’t have a record company telling us what to do and things like that. We are the only ones responsible for what’s coming out to the audience.

Sheri: So, it’s quite raw and all your own with no restrictions?

Johan: It suits us that way haha. It’s good to have tips of course but…

Sheri: I think if you’re changing so much over time it becomes something you don’t want it to be…

Johan: Exactly. I think that’s the main reason why they called me up again because they said they lost the spirit of what was there and they wanna try and give it another chance by pretty much create the old band again and yeah… that was one of the main reasons, they wanted to the old Candlemass sound to have another chance. Get back to the roots!

Sheri: If Candlemass were a drink – what would you be? Haha.

Johan: Hahaha! What would I be… hmmm…? I don’t drink that many drinks but a drink that I like is actually the old Gin and Tonic, that’s fine with me… it’s not that dark haha. But I’ll say Gin and Tonic just because I like that haha. It works through old times.

Sheri: There’s different flavours and everything at the moment!

Johan: Yeah but you know, I’m old and I don’t like it too sweet and there are so many out there hahaha!

Sheri: Interesting choice haha! Have you got a song that is your favourite to perform?

Johan: The old Epicus songs, I really do like to do all those songs from that album still. And I really do like doing the Nightfall songs too. And in the future, there will be more songs because there is a big library to pick great songs from. We were talking and they want me to feel comfortable doing the songs too. So of course, we will do the new songs. I really do like all the songs that we’re doing, so I can’t say I’m not doing any songs I don’t like. All the songs I do really like, they’re great songs.

Sheri: You just get out there and love it haha.

Johan: Yeah hahaha! And that’s pretty important when you’re the singer too… if you’re trying to keep your smile up and you hate the songs, that shouldn’t be good hahaha! I really enjoy the moments on the stage, playing around, just having a good time, so it’s brilliant right now.

Sheri: Very humbling! Another of our readers, Jack, has asked how you decided on the name of Candlemass?

Johan: Oooooh, actually I don’t know the history behind the name! That’s a question better to ask Leif hahaha. I can’t tell you, I’m sorry hahaha. It’s a long time ago and we don’t talk about that… sorry Jack! Hahaha.

Sheri: We will let him know! Hahaha. Finally, What advice can you offer to other Artists, new or experienced?

Johan: Never give up. If you believe in what you’re doing, continue. Don’t give up. Never give up. Even though there will be hard times and you know, if you have your goal, in time you will be there. I’ve been there myself; I’ve been working a lot with music and writing; you learn from that hard work. If someone tells you that this is shit and you shouldn’t bother, just continue with what you’re doing if you believe in it.

Sheri: Absolutely. If you are committed to something and you believe in it then carry on.

Johan: Yeah, you do it for yourself too and if you’re fortunate that other people like the songs you do too, so that’s very important, don’t give up. I’m pretty much, what you say, being a “rock star” now and I’m close to 60 haha so… you never give up hahaha.

Sheri: I think you learn a lot through that. Through mistakes, positivity, hitting rock bottom or anything in life, there’s always light at the end of the tunnel as long as you stick true to who you are.

Johan: Oh yeah of course, I can be all on my own just playing guitar at night on my own and having a great time… if no one wants to listen… Then I can have a great time myself hahaha. Keep on playing.

Sheri: Keep on keeping. Hahaha. Well thank you for your insight and I hope other viewers might find this useful.

Johan: Thank you very much for calling me up.

Sheri: Much appreciated. Take care, be safe, be happy Johan!

Johan: Thank you very much and have a really nice day!

Rick Here; I would like to take this opportunity to thank both Johan and Sheri for the great interview. To keep up to date with everything Candlemass related then click on the following links!
www.candlemass.se/doom/
www.facebook.com/candlemass/
www.instagram.com/candlemassdoom/
www.twitter.com/candlemass
www.open.spotify.com/artist/7zDtfSB0AOZWhpuAHZIOw5
www.youtube.com/channel/UCIXDUCw6Ek8FV5_PZRTHqWg

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Desert Storm – Omens

Desert Storm – Omens
APF Records
Release Date: 01/05/2020
Running Time: 39:46
Review by Alun Jones
9.5/10

Put your feet up, relax – pour yourself a drink and take the weight off your feet. All you need to do is chill – I’ve already done the hard work. I’ve found your new favourite band: they’re called Desert Storm, and their latest album has just been released by APF records.

If you’re new to the name, Desert Storm are from merry old Oxford; and since forming in 2007, have been building their following formidably. They’ve appeared at major rock festivals; plus supported and toured with some personal heroes of mine (Corrosion of Conformity, The Atomic Bitchwax amongst others). I saw Desert Storm a few years ago supporting the mighty Karma to Burn; they managed to steal the show from the headliners, as far as I was concerned.

Opening with a sombre, haunting spoken word piece, “Omens” proceeds to take the listener on a journey that is powerful, yet also introspective. It’s an otherworldly trip that’s both visceral and immediate, but also demands greater exploration.

‘Black Bile’ demonstrates the strategy perfectly: heavy, grinding and relentless – with moments of melody that blend into the whole without jarring. In absolute basics, this is the sludge of Down combined with the aspirational progressiveness of Mastodon. Thudding, head banging riffs adorn ‘Vengeful Gods’, but there’s also an almost Morricone-like cinematic sensation as the song develops and grows.

At times anthemic, there are also magnificently effective sections of the songs that contrast beautifully with the hard driving doom metal.  ‘Pain, Grief And Suffering’ features an extended mid-section that is beguilingly serene. When the heavy re-enters, it’s all the more neck-breakingly persuasive. Throw in a captivating solo and you’re on to a highlight.

‘The Path Of Most Resistance’ builds from humble beginnings to a massive groove riff of Sabbathian splendour; whilst ‘Lockjaw’ is short and brutal. This leads us to the final track, ‘Rebirth’: a masterpiece that is heavy only in sentiment. What a song. Despite a medieval vibe, it’s the ideal soundtrack to spin whilst driving through the desert in a stolen Dodge Challenger as the sun sets, with Smokey on your tail.

Every song on “Omens” can be enjoyed on its own merits, but as a whole plays as a genuine compendium that the listener can enjoy from start to finish. I knew Desert Storm were good, but I didn’t expect them to have grown so much. Or deliver a new album with so much scope. Here’s a British band that could step up into national – and then international – consciousness. They just need your support. Do it. I’m off to buy the vinyl version.

Talking about deserts – did I tell you about that infamous escapade on one of my legendary soul-searching soirees into the Mojave? I crept into my usual cave to seek shelter, only to encounter Jim bloody Morrison hogging it. He was out of his gourd on peyote and mumbling about Aldous Huxley or some such. There was no way I could meditate with that loon around, so I threw him out. Break through that to the other side, Jimbo! My Yaqui shaman and I needed the space to contact Atlantis.

TRACKLISTING:
01. Omens
02. Black Bile
03. Vengeful Gods
04. Pain, Grief and Suffering
05. The Path Of Most Resistance
06. The Machine
07. Lockjaw
08. Rebirth

LINE-UP:
Chris White – Guitar, Bass, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Ryan Cole – Guitar
Chris Benoist – Bass
Elliot Cole – Drums
Matthew Ryan – Vocals

LINKS:
www.facebook.com/desertstormuk/
www.desertstorm.bandcamp.com/
www.twitter.com/desertstormuk
www.instagram.com/desertstormuk/
www.facebook.com/apfrecords/
www.apfrecords.bandcamp.com/
www.apfrecords.co.uk/

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Alun Jones and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with KING CORPSE

EMQ’s with KING CORPSE

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Stourbridge, UK based Doom/Sludge Metal band King Corpse. Huge thanks to all of them for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Jack Cradock: Bass guitar, Vocals, lubrication supervisor. We started out as a three piece and we’re still a three piece now.

Toby Sambidge: Drums. I was last to join, replacing the original drummer. The band was still in its very early stages though, before we had played our first gig back in 2015.

James Pearson: I’m James, I’ve played guitar with Jack for 9 years in various forms. I believe King Corpse formed a couple of months before I joined, so I jumped in with Jack and our first drummer and excellent person Joe. We played with Joe for a few months and wrote most of the first EP together, then Joe decided to move along, and Toby joined us. We played some shows, put out the first EP and we’ve been marching inexorably forward ever since.

How did you come up with your band name?

JC: I didn’t.

T: Unfortunately, that happened before I was drumming for KC.

JP: I’ll defer to Jack on that one, he and Joe came up with the name before I joined the band.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

JC: The Black Country. The scene’s bostin’ our kid.

T: I went to the same school Robert Plant went to and Black Sabbath was born in the town over. So yeah.

JP: We’re all from the Black Country in the UK, all from around the town of Stourbridge. The scene in the Midlands is pretty sweet right now, there’s some top-class metal from every sub-genre you could think of. There are still some great venues going, but I think we’ve lost a lot, same as everywhere else in the UK.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

JC: That’d be “Sacred Crimson”, available on Spotify, Band Camp, Sound Cloud, You Tube, Apple Music, etc.

T: Sacred Crimson, available on all major streaming platforms now!

JP: Our new release is our second EP “Sacred Crimson”. Five brands new tracks, three remasters of previous releases, many, many riffs.

Who have been your greatest influences?

JC: Probably our Dark Lord Martin Clunes.

T: I know everyone says it, but I couldn’t live with myself if I didn’t so, Black Sabbath. Also Led Zeppelin, Electric Wizard, Yob, Northlane, Voidlurker, Tuumanduumband, way too many bands to put into one answer.

JP: Personally, Martin Clunes. He just makes me want to be a better person.

What first got you into music?

JC: Listening to tunes in the car with my dad. Sabbath, The Doors, AC/DC, Led Zep…

T: My big brother Phil, shout out to Phil.

JP: The earliest memory I have of actually listening to music was finding my dad’s copy of Meatloaf’s “Bat Out Of Hell” album in the CD drawer when I was like 6 or 7. That’s pretty embarrassing, but I think it was the drama and the stories that first made me want to listen to music. I didn’t really get into metal and actually playing music until I was about 11.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

JC: I’d merge King Corpse with Voidlurker into the ultimate doom metal group. We’ve already sorted our first song title. If you know, you know.

T: Snarky Puppy, even if it was just playing the Tambourine. In fact, I’d rather just play the Tambourine because there’s no way I’d be able to play along with those guys.

JP: Flight Of The Conchords. I’d love to play with those guys.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

JC: Bloodstock! Best fest in the world.

T: The Official Martin Clunes Annual Worship Festival.

JP: Bloodstock. Because we’re a British doom metal band and that’s about as high as I’m prepared to set my sights for the time being.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

JC: A Martenitsa. A Bulgarian traditional bracelet to welcome the spring. Not weird in itself, but he put it on us before explaining what it was.

T: We’re not quite there yet.

JP: A cool Bulgarian biker dude once gave me and Jack magic wish bracelets at a show in Stafford. I hung mine on a blossoming tree and wished for a global pandemic. My bad guys.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

JC: Don’t do heroin.

T: Epstein didn’t kill himself.

JP: See you at D&D on Monday guys.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

JC: Lemmy!

T: Jim Morrison.

JP: Phil Lynott. More Thin Lizzy would have been great.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

JC: I enjoy torturing James by coming up with weird chords. I hate venues without parking.

T: Hanging out with friends and making music that we want to listen to. And I hate the parking outside pretty much every venue.

JP: Playing live with my friends is easily the best part, there’s no feeling like it. Carrying things, however, can suck a fat one.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

JC: Martin Clunes has never released a record. That needs rectifying.

T: I’m not getting into this here.

JP: I wrote six different answers to this and they all turned into damning, paragraph-long indictments of the profit motive in the arts. So, for the sake of simplicity I’ll say streaming services. That, in particular, is way out of whack.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

JC: YOB – “The Great Cessation”

T: ‘Led Zeppelin IV’

JP: Judas Priest – “Painkiller” …PAIN. PAIN. KILLER. KILLER.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

JC: Well I love vinyl, but I can’t fit as many in my pocket as I can with Spotify. Really depends.

T: Vinyl, Cassettes and CD’s because there’s more money in it, ok looks like I am getting into it here then.

JP: That depends on where you are. Vinyl is great but you can’t listen to it in the car, can you?

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

JC: HRH Metal was a blast, Conan/Monolord support was great fun.

T: Either our only show at Base studios in Stourbridge or supporting Conan and Monolord.

JP: We opened for Conan and Monolord once. I still can’t believe that happened.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

JC: Recording/producing musicians.

T: Writing poems about Martin Clunes.

JP: I’d go back to my old job. Wafting cool air over Martin Clunes with palm fronds. It was rewarding work.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

JC: Joe Worton, Alex Greaves, Alex Harrod, Pete Anderson, Neda Stonyte. They aren’t famous, they’re my friends and my girlfriend, soon to be wife.

T: The Queen, Johnny Rotten, Joe Rogan, Trump and of course… Martin Clunes.

JP: Martin Clunes, Martin Sheen, Martin Freeman, Martin Luther King Jr and Ricky Martin.

What’s next for the band?

JC: We’re working on an album about all of the negative press that we’ve ever got.

T: Hopefully, a tour of the UK.

JP: Well, with the global pandemic and all I’m not entirely sure. Write an album and get back to playing shows ASAP I suppose.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

JC:
www.kingcorpse.bandcamp.com/
www.spotify.com/artist/4Z77q92lHobHxRpiGAx4Zj
www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CVR5nhc6Nc

T:
www.twitter.com/KingCorpseUK

JP: I am the absolute worst at social media, but Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and most importantly Bandcamp, where you can buy our stuff.

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

JC: Cake

T: Biscuit

JP: Irrelevant. They’re gross.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

T: Thanks for giving us your time and shoutout to Martin Clunes.

JP: Thanks for asking me about things. And apologies to whoever has to collate whatever nonsense my band mates and I have thrown at you. (Yes, Thanks for that – Rick 😊)

Photo by Will Morgan Photography

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.