EMQ’s with SECOND SHOOTER

EMQ’s with SECOND SHOOTER

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Los Angeles, California based Extreme Metal band, Second Shooter. Huge thanks to vocalist, Melanie Johnson, for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

My name is Melanie Johnson and I’m the vocalist of extreme metal band Second Shooter (groove metal/hardcore/thrash). The band has a kind of weird history. The two remaining original members, long-time friends Travis Hildreth (guitar) and Jim Wilinski (drums), were part of a band called Salvage 67 in 2015, when their vocalist went to prison for killing his wife. So that brought the band to a screeching halt.

Now that they’ve had some distance from the situation, we do make jokes about how that’s a pretty metal story (and we call my microphone at the studio the “Murder Mic”), but of course it was absolutely devastating to everyone involved. It took the band a while to move on; sometimes they didn’t even have the heart to pick up their instruments at practice. And I don’t mean to discount the pain of the victim’s loved ones, who are suffering to this day. Sorry to start the interview with something so heavy!

Anyway, the band in its current iteration came together in 2018 when Wynn McElwee (guitar), Jeff Clark (bass) and I joined.

How did you come up with your band name?

Unrelated to the murder thing, I promise! I wasn’t there when it was conceived of, but I know part of its appeal is the ambiguity. It could refer to JFK conspiracy theories, or to hypothetical shootings; it’s a common term in photography; and people always come up with other possible interpretations.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We’re in Los Angeles, California, and honestly the scene is great here. The local scene is large, excitingly diverse, and very mutually supportive. And all the big acts come through because we’re a huge city. Sure, it isn’t as big as some of the major European cities for metal, but still – no complaints!

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

We just released this video for ‘1 in 6’ from our self-titled EP. It’s a super aggressive, super feminist song, and the video really captures that (thank you so much to TJ Grof, Rhys Green, and Sarah Doerner!):

Who have been your greatest influences?

For my vocals, I draw inspiration from all over the spectrum of heavy music, including some metal-adjacent genres like hardcore, post-hardcore, and even emo. For the band overall, some major influences are Pantera, Korn, Slipknot, classic death metal, early thrash metal… really all over the place. We like groovy, we like brutal, we like fast.

What first got you into music?

My mom is the coolest person I know and has introduced me to a large proportion of what I’ve listened to throughout my life. She also took me to lots of concerts as a teenager and she loved them as much as I did. She took me to my first show – Green Day – and some other great high school memories with her include seeing Opeth, Megadeth, Sabbath with Dio, Dream Theater, Machine Head… not to mention totally-not-metal bands like the White Stripes, the Shins, Death Cab for Cutie…

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

I haven’t really thought about that! In the abstract I’d like to feature a male vocalist for the contrast, but when I think about who I’d really love to work with and who would sound sick on our tracks, I think of like, Angela Gossow (ex-Arch Enemy), Tatiana Shmailyuk (Jinjer), Māra Lisenko (Māra)…

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

I don’t know a lot about the international festivals, which I’m sure are the best, so I’ll keep it local-ish: I think it would be pretty sick to play Las Rageous.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Ooh, none of those yet. Fan art would be weird but also fun.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Send me fan art ;). Just kidding. I’d say: make some art! Music, visual art, poetry… even if you don’t think you’d be good at it, if you have any inkling at all, you should definitely give it a shot. Having a creative outlet is great!

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Chester Bennington’s suicide tore me apart. His music got so many people through rough times, gave people hope, literally saved lives… and it’s so tragic not only that he’s not here anymore but also that he couldn’t save himself.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Ahh I enjoy everything about being a musician! Seeing people rocking the fuck out at shows, hearing from people that our music really resonated with them, the satisfaction of a song coming together… everything! Well, I guess not the pay-to-play culture of the big venues in LA.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

The pay-to-play thing is lame. For people who aren’t familiar: P2P is when a venue says, “Here are X tickets, sell them at $Y each and give us that much money.” So, in theory you could break even or make a profit, but in practice that never really happens — we aren’t going to charge our friends or fans face value if they’re getting their tickets from us.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

“The Shape of Punk to Come” by Refused. Just so sick beginning to end.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Was never into vinyl. I bought a lot of CD’s for most of my life, but streaming has absolutely taken over. You have access to everything!

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

All of our shows have been such a great time! It was super exciting and an honour to open for Jinjer in September of last year. Equally fun was a “Women Who Rock” show the next month, featuring local female-fronted bands ranging in heaviness from an acoustic set to… us. The crowd response was so great!

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

Well, music is my hobby and my real job is as a software engineer. Without music, I’d be what I was a few years ago: a software engineer in desperate need of a creative outlet!

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Definitely some (extremely) high-ranking American politicians and some powerful people who have gotten away with assault, then I’d burn the place down. Sorry not sorry.

What’s next for the band?

We’re writing a bunch of stuff and I’m absolutely psyched about it all. We plan to release a full-length this year. We haven’t played in a few months because we’ve been focusing on new material, but we are itching to get back on stage!! Got some shows in the works.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.facebook.com/SecondShooterBand
instagram.com/SecondShooterBand
www. secondshooter.bandcamp.com

And of course, we’re on all the streaming platforms.

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

I’m an American, I don’t understand Jaffa Cakes or the metric system!

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

This was fun! Thank you so much for Ever Metal for the opportunity and all the hard work you put into your site!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Olan Parkinson and Steve Maher of Abaddon Incarnate

Interview with Olan Parkinson and Steve Maher of Abaddon Incarnate
By Tammy Lomax

Hi Everyone, Rick Here,

In the underground extreme music scene Irish Deathgrind outfit Abaddon Incarnate could be considered a seminal band within the genre. They’ve been around for over 25 years now but there have been some interesting developments of late. Our very own Tammy recently got the chance to have a chat with Drummer Olan and Guitarist Steve about not only these, but also the bands history!

Tammy: Firstly, congratulations on the recent news with being signed to Transcending Obscurity Records for a multiple album deal. How are you feeling about this? And what will this entail for 2020 and the future?

Olan: Thank you, Tammy; yeah it is great news and great timing. We were planning to record in 2020 anyway but now to have an official platform through which we can release it is amazing. I have known of TO records for a long time and always admired Kunal’s drive and his dedication to real underground bands and really heavy stuff too, almost like the Indian Relapse Records. So, in June we are heading to Foel Studios to record with Chris Fielding which is awesome. I have worked with Chris several times now. He is just great, a thorough professional and just gets heavy dirty music. He has good history with Irish bands too having recorded with both Primordial and Mourning Beloveth. With regard to the future, who knows, Abaddon have always been an unknown quantity, but history has shown that we ‘do not go gentle into the good night’ so I would expect something ferocious for full length no 6.

Tammy: Kunal Chokski (owner of TO records) mentions that he has been a huge fan of Abaddon Incarnate since the release of “Nadir” in 2001. What is your favourite track on this album and why? And can you guide us through the process of how you wrote the album?

Olan: Ha heavy question; I of course have several! I’m going to pick two if I may? Opener ‘I Will Nail You In’ has got to be up there. It’s just relentless from start to finish and the lyrics match, just full on without being overly graphic, but full of genuine vitriol. Ironically the title came about from a joke which I will tell you in person one day. It’s still a staple in the live set, our ‘Angel Of Death’ if you will. I also love ‘Unclean’ I think as a contrast it is a bit more mid paced but with a real groovy middle 8 but it literally is unclean, it feels it, it’s a filthy song, again the subject matter is quite dark! I wrote the lyrics for this one, and I love exploring the blackness within humans and the depravity that we are capable of.

The writing of “Nadir”, once it got underway happened quite quickly. We actually had about 10 tracks written for an album and thought we were almost there with the process. It felt strained and not very natural though, we hadn’t quite crossed the line into Grindcore at this stage but we were all getting into more extreme stuff, I was really loving Brutal Truth’s, Extreme Conditions and Need To Control, and we were all getting into Nasum circa Inhale Exhale and Human 2.0. So, one rehearsal Bill came in with the main riff for ‘I Will Nail You In’ and that was it, game changer. We scrapped the whole album and started re-writing and it was Deathgrind from then on. And due to the Nasum influence we asked Mieszko (RIP) would he be interested in working with us and the rest is history. “Nadir” was recorded over 2 weeks or so in his studio in Sweden.

Tammy: Abaddon Incarnate have been going for 25 years. As you might expect, during this time, some members have come, gone and returned. What inspires you to keep motivated regardless of setbacks?

Steve: I’m pretty stubborn, so setbacks motivate me. It’s sad to lose old members but people move on, the exciting part is when you get a new line-up; you get new ideas and energy!

Tammy: Abaddon Incarnate were the first extreme Irish band to play in Ecuador, Colombia and Peru. What advice and tips can you give to up and coming bands regarding networking and getting their name out there?

Steve: We were approached by South American promoters “Guts n Blood”. He did a magazine feature and the tour arose from that. Similar to our first Australian tour! If you want to get your name out there you need good distribution and good PR. Labels will do PR work but sometimes it’s worth investing in a bit more PR. We have a few individuals who do good work for us.

Tammy: You guys have had some huge achievements, like supporting massive bands Obituary, Napalm Death, Bolt Thrower etc…What has been the most memorable and rewarding so far?

Steve: Playing with all these bands is great. But the most memorable gigs are the DIY tours we headline ourselves like the Australian, South American or Russian tours we did.

Tammy: What is the most Bizarre thing that has happened on stage on a tour?

Olan: I can only speak for myself here of course but there have been a few. One gig, years ago, a guy jumped up on stage, smashed a beer glass and started cutting himself while we were playing. I also remember a gig in the Czech Republic at this small bar in the middle of nowhere. When we arrived there was no one about. No cars, chickens running around…all very weird. But come gig time people came from all over and filled the place. We had this support band and they had this dude playing guitar who had lost his arms and legs when he got run over by a train. He had this little rig fashioned where he had his plectrum attached to his stump, and he played with that…amazing! That place had some of the weirdest coloured drinks I’ve ever seen. But probably the most memorable bizarre thing for me was on that same tour. Not on stage however, but we were out with Desecration and this was towards the end of this tour. We had decided to stay in a hotel after this gig; it might even have been the last show. But we finished late, like midnight or 1am and we went back to this Hotel. It was all locked up but there was a cellar bar open there so down we went. The barman was sitting on this couch with this topless girl and watching porn, drinking a bottle of champagne. He was a very friendly chap though and brought us over a bottle of Absinthe, genuine Absinthe. I don’t think any of us had had the real shit before, but we got stuck into it. After whatever amount of time, the door burst open and these two rather large policemen barged in, guns and all, and next thing we were all up against the wall getting searched as they were roaring at the barman. But I’ll never forget just looking at the guys and everyone was pissing themselves laughing, it was so surreal, none of us had I.D. on us…nothing, it could have been a really serious situation but at the time it was the funniest thing ever. Thankfully they just kicked us out and we went to our room. I haven’t had any Absinthe since that night!!

Tammy: With some help and guidance from Zero Tolerance Magazine, in 2013, you made your stamp in Australia and have set up tours like ‘The Drunks and Convicts Tour 2017’ and a vast amount of others. Can you explain the pros and cons regarding the Australian underground scene and if there are any similarities to any of the other countries you’ve played?

Steve: I love Australia. The bands over there are quality and the scene is pretty awesome especially in places like Melbourne! We play a lot of small shows over there too but in Melbourne we always manage to do at least two gigs and get a sizeable crowd. The last tour we did there for example we did 3 Melbourne gigs in 2 weeks. Melbourne is an arty creative place. Australia is really unlike anywhere else. There is a unique vibe to the place.

Tammy: London Deathfest, Dublin Deathfest and headlining Carnage Festival in Switzerland are amongst some of the festivals you have previously played. What festivals would you like to play in the future?

Olan: I guess any of the big ones have to be on the list. Hellfest or Wacken would be awesome. Personally, I would love to get to Maryland Deathfest. But also, festivals like Fuck The Commerce and Obscene Extreme are just brilliant for showcasing the filthiest bands on the planet. But it’s important to support smaller festivals as they will be the festivals of the future. Metaldays in Slovenia for example! That is definitely one of the better new festivals. Great country too!

Tammy: Abaddon Incarnate was reformed from thrash legends Bereaved. What were the reasons for you changing the name and who made the decision?

Olan: I think it was mainly due to the change of direction, musically. We felt that the name Bereaved, while a cool name, didn’t suit the heavier, more aggressive direction the band was headed in. So, I think the decision was a collective one. We had several variations but eventually settled on Abaddon Incarnate. It suited our themes and mind-set at the time. Lyrically things have moved on, but the basic ideologies and motivations are the same. I still quite like the original logo which I designed (I use that word loosely) I can still remember the 30 or so attempts over a couple of days to get it to what it is now, Brutal Truth’s logo was the inspiration. I can still remember bringing it to rehearsals for approval, and Steve saying, “it looks like a coffee stain”, but they must have liked it because we still use it today.

Tammy: If you could all select one Icon to invite over for a good few beers and fine dining who would it be and why?

Olan: Well unfortunately, I can only speak for myself here. I would love to sit drink and talk with Reinhold Messner. Many people will know that he was the first mountaineer to summit all fourteen 8000 metre peaks and the first to summit Everest without supplemental oxygen as well as the first solo summit of Everest, the list goes on. It is an incredible feat today but absolutely unthinkable back in the days that he did it. He has written over 80 books and runs a mountaineering museum in the South Tyrol. I just think he would be fascinating to talk to. However, I could be wrong. Maybe he is sick of talking about mountains and would just want to get pissed. But that in itself would be a cool story!

Rick here again;

I’d like to thank Tammy, Olan and Steve for the interview and I, for one, cannot wait to hear the new album when it is ready. If you want to find out more about Abaddon Incarnate then click on the links below

LINKS:

Band:

https://www.facebook.com/abaddonincarnate/
https://www.instagram.com/abaddon.incarnate.official/
https://abaddonincarnate.bandcamp.com/
https://open.spotify.com/artist/7JiGOjZmUWZWyhhQsyBZs4
https://www.youtube.com/user/stevemaher666

Label:

https://tometal.com/
https://www.facebook.com/transcendingobscurityrecords/
https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Tammy Lomax and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with CADAVER SOIREE

Cadaver Soiree Logo

EMQ’s with CADAVER SOIREE

Hi Everyone. Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Leeds based Extreme Metal band Cadaver Soiree! Huge thanks to them for taking part!

What is your name, what do you play and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

We are:
Marc Hood – vocals and smells
Andy Firth – Guitars and programming
Neil Hannaford – Bass and beards

We play a lovely blend of old school death metal with hints of black metal and doom, there’s also a few industrial influences thrown in for fun. We formed in 2016, with the final line-up as it currently is forming in 2018. We released our first EP through MSH music group and the latest album is self-released.

How did you come up with your band name?

It was suggested by a friend of the band and stuck.

What country are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

UK – the scene is great and getting stronger every day. We’ve found support up and down the country wherever we’ve played.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single or Video)

“To Betray The Creator” is a mix of old and new songs and marks the starting point for the band in this incarnation.

Who have been your greatest influences?

We’ve got too many influences to mention fully but Cannibal Corpse, Carcass, Napalm Death, White Zombie, Sepultura and Autopsy

What first got you into music?

Neil: “Louis Armstrong”.

Andy: “I genuinely can’t remember, as long as I can remember I’ve been into and playing music”.

Marc “vocally being asked to join Cadaver Soiree was my first foray into shouting/fronting a band but I’ve played bass in a few bands before. Early Metallica videos played a big part”.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Zeal and Ardour would be ridiculously good.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Bloodstock or Wacken would be amazing, though in honesty we’d be happy to play virtually any festival with a good line-up.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Neil had his palm read by a fan once. In a previous life he was apparently an executioner and a World War One nurse. Presumably not in the same life!

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Hello!

If you could bring one Metal/Rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Dead!

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Marc: Pure catharsis, I hate apathy.

Neil: The buzz of playing live.

Andy: Creating.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Fairer pay for artist streams.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Marc: “Beneath The Remains” – Sepultura

Neil: “Chaos AD” – Sepultura

Andy: It changes too frequently to say one.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

CD’s so long as they’re good quality.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Virtually any gig we’ve played at Rebellion Manchester, always a great crowd and sound.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

We do lots of things. Mostly really boring things!

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

The other two band members and their partners.

What’s next for the band?

Writing’s already started for the next release, and we’re booking shows for as regular as possible. BOOK US.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

https://open.spotify.com/artist/0eQPD6r6nkniygbtsDfHpv
https://www.facebook.com/CadaverSoiree/

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

They’re a cake. Clue’s in the name.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thanks for your time too, you lovely people. Hope folks enjoy the music. Can’t wait to shout at you all!

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Damim – A Fine Game Of Nil

A Fine Game Of Nil Cover

Damim – A Fine Game Of Nil
Apocalyptic Witchcraft Recordings
Release Date: 28/06/2019
Running Time: 42:40
Review by ‘Dark Juan’
10/10

It is Saturday night in rural France. The local gossips have returned to their homes after disseminating all possible information to the entire village, and probably have been strapped back into their scold’s bridles by the husbands who are STILL covering up twenty year old affairs of the heart with the lady on the Rue de Ty Lidec. I, Dark Juan, The Gothfather, Love Commando and Sex Fuhrer to toffs and gentry, am sitting, beer in hand and having my face torn clean off by this piece of SAVAGERY masquerading as music entitled “A Fine Game Of Nil” by British neo-blackened metallers Damim – Damim being Arabic/Aramaic for bloodshed, I believe. That’s about the only useful fact you’ll get out of this stream of consciousness bollocks you’re about to read, so treasure it, ok?

First of all, I have to say the production work on this record is extremely satisfying, almost to the point of orgasm. Everything is so crystal fucking clear the band might as well be sat in my head battering the inside of my cranium with high powered amplification and pneumatic drills. However this is ultra-precise savagery, because Damim as musicians are tighter than a duck’s arse, and probably considerably more waterproof because they write huge, coruscating songs of complexity, power and depth and play them at a speed that Formula One drivers would struggle to comprehend. There are many key changes and time changes but nothing of the music, even when it’s flitting from one tempo to another, is extraneous. The musical progressions are logical and impressive and it all fits together like a particularly complex heavy fucking metal jigsaw puzzle. Special mention must also go to Nathanael Underwood for his vocals – a primeval, visceral roar that appears to have come from the bowels of some previously undiscovered hell found underneath the foundations of Satan’s bit of it, yet retaining clarity and having words that are actually discernible as they are being sung! This is a momentous feat in death and blackened metal so bonus points to you, old chap!

Normally it just sounds like bears vomiting. Not that all this talk of intelligence, complicated musicianship and socially conscious lyrics should distract you from the fact that this is the dog’s testicles from a sheer metal point of view. There’s blastbeats and brutality in spades. It’s not a battlewagon of a record, it’s a sleek and shiny supersonic jet fighter of one. It’s blindingly fast and sharp and operates precision guided weaponry, and YOU are the target. Damim are out to kill you all with laser-guided accuracy.

So, compositionally exquisite, vocally exemplary and velocity unmatched! There has to be a downside, right? Well, fucking good luck finding one, mate. Damim are a phenomenally intelligent band. The lyrics are pertinent and relevant to events in the world today and even the album title alludes to zero sum game theory. Look it up, it’s actually genuinely fascinating. I love this record so much I have ruined yet more underwear and had to pause in my libertine pursuits of alcohol, laudanum and abusing young ladies to reflect on the sheer majesty and magnificence of what I have just heard. In fact, I have finished the record and literally just pressed play again to start over. It appears I want my face to look like burger meat, considering Damim are flaying it off bit by bit. Favourite tracks on here are ‘Beyond The Call Of Emptiness’, and the hilariously named ‘Something For The Weekend’. It’s hilarious because the song title seems so out of keeping with the rest of the record, OK? I also really like ‘NecroKino’, a tune that the intro reminds me greatly of the synthwave stylings of groups like Gunship offer before pulling out hidden weapons and proceeding to skin you alive with diamond sharp guitars and drums that can cause tectonic misery. The other titles skirt perilously close to one of my favourite sources of comedy – heavy metal word salad song titles. As we shall shortly see!

In short then – if you love extreme metal you’ll fucking love this. If, on the other hand, you think metal begins and ends with Avenged Sevenfold you’ll hate it so much you’ll savagely murder your own parents. “A Fine Game Of Nil” is PROOF that metal is one of the most phenomenally complex styles of music to play and also one of the most difficult to master. Damim have fucking mastered it, made it their collective bitch and are currently beating it into further compliance with flails and chains and all manner of unspeakable other things. The thing is, I am of the opinion that this record is that good that it might win a few converts from the less extreme fans, because although it is brutal deluxe, faster than a trip to the lavatory after a dodgy curry and heavier than a neutronium sex toy, it somehow STILL remains accessible and approachable. Damim have done something remarkable. They have made music bordering on black metal interesting again (which is not easily done as there hasn’t been a proper good black metal record since “Anthems To The Welkin At Dusk”) and also made it something even a new convert could enjoy instead of just the hardened heavy metal warrior. There’s much to enjoy as parts of the music touch on other styles like djent, the odd riff progression has a whiff of nu-metal about it and there is a thrash element running throughout the whole thing. I also think having an excellent production job will also win fans considering most extreme metal sounds like it has been recording using candy floss and asbestos as filters and recorded through the wall next door.

Anyway. A splendid effort from these gentlemen! I’m serious when I say that I consider this to be the album of the year so far. I fucking love it.

The Patented Dark Juan Blood Splat Rating System offers Damim a blood soaked and thoroughly gore coated 10/10. Extraordinarily good! I have run out of words.

TRACKLISTING:
01. In A Language They Understand
02. Descendant Of Amalek (If you don’t know, Amalek is described in the Hebrew Bible as a country that is an enemy of the Israelites It can also be referring to the nation’s founder, the grandson of Esau. You’re welcome. Just because I despise religion as social control doesn’t mean I haven’t studied the scriptures.)
03. Beyond The Call Of Emptiness (Surely emptiness can’t call? Because it’s like… empty?)
04. Something For The Weekend
05. NecroKino
06. Body Is Broken
07. Rising Of The Lights
08. Existential Epiphany Within A Waking Dream (The only existential things I get during waking dreams are crises…)
09. All I Want To Know Is (what the rest of this title is because my computer is refusing to tell me. Sorry, chaps.) – (RICK HERE, the full title is ‘All I Want To Know Is How It Ends’)

LINE-UP:
Nathanael Underwood – Vocals and guitars
Flow Toulman – Drums
Faust Perez – Bass
Edd Amos – Guitars

LINKS:
https://www.damim.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/dam.nation.uk/

https://www.instagram.com/damim_uk/

https://www.youtube.com/user/vacuusanimum

 

Damim Photo - Credit Tina Korhonen

 

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Dark Juan and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Photo courtesy of Tina Korhonen.

 

Krysthla – Worldwide Negative

Worldwide Negative Cover

Krysthla – Worldwide Negative
PHD
Release Date: 16/08/2019
Running Time: 42:28
Review by Tammy Lomax
10/10

When I was given the opportunity to review Krysthla’s new album “Worldwide Negative” I was ecstatic. It was quite cosmic as at the time I was commuting and listening to ‘Luminosity’ from their debut album!

In my opinion Krysthla are by far one of the best extreme metal bands out there and their hard work has already proven to be a massive success for them.

There are many reasons why I appreciate Krysthla, mainly being how consistent they are with their delivery in everything they do, from live performances to mastering their albums and are genuinely lovely fellas; they literally are masters in perfection. When I was first introduced to Krysthla they were supporting Textures and they utterly smashed the hell out of the stage. They hammer with precision and they are persistent in whatever they convey.

“A War Of Souls And Desires” was released in 2015 and this was only the beginning of something beautiful. Two years later “Peace In Our Time” was released and, putting it lightly, blew your ears off and it hit a No.2 slot in Amazon’s Rock and Metal chart. Krysthla did not stop there, playing the Sophie Stage at Bloodstock Festival and then going on to tour with the mighty Decapitated. Just when you assume they cannot get any better they do and don’t do it lightly! Like a massive wallop in the face, if you aren’t awake yet then you will be after listening to “Worldwide Negative” It is going to be huge!

Recently released single ‘Zero Sum Game’ has had tremendous amounts of airplay on Kerrang, Primordial, and Bloodstock radio etc. along with their music video, DO go and check it out! It’s a massive tease into what to expect with the rest of the album. I am actually still recovering from the shock of it all because “Worldwide Negative” has reached out beyond all expectations.

When I plugged my headphones in, straight away bang!!

Krysthla have become more dynamic with their synth sounds, making the music flow. It is the foundation to their new sound and personally I cannot imagine them without these now.

The emotion you experience after listening to album opener ‘Negative’ is baffling, you’re almost unsure of how to feel and then ‘Reawaken’ slaps you hard in the face. You reach a pinnacle then are thrown back down vigorously and you end up like a pile of mashed potato! Then, out of nowhere, comes the wonderful chorus, how have they pulled this off? Your head is all over the place trying to comprehend what the hell is going on but it is absolute magic, art and science all at the same time.

‘Grief Is New Love’ is much faster with what seems like some heavy slam riffs. I have no space left in my brain to actually understand how they have managed to pull off fast thrash and slam together, it is heavy, mean and it is angry, its pure evil actually. You feel the passion in this track completely, it’s insanely good and you don’t want it to end. It is diverse with switching dynamics but also flows beautifully. I can accept that I have never heard anything so powerful before!

‘Zero Sum Game’ is definitely the big tease as mentioned earlier. Never assume with Krysthla because they will blow that out the water and then go ahead and set it on fire. In all seriousness picking a favourite track on this album is impossible. ‘White Castles’ is a little break from the hammering, but it’s done in such a way where you don’t want to relax. You can relate to the expression of pain is all I can say. It is beautifully done and you can really hear their message in this track… this is your moment to take a breather. For sure it pulls at your heart, thus much easier on the ears. Have you ever wanted to scream at the world? Then this track will get you. It is slower but massively needed.

‘Psalm Of Heartlessness’ is exactly what Krysthla are about, bringing you back into the album after absolute mayhem. One of my favourite things about their sound has to be the vocals, Adrian Mayes has an exceptionally powerful voice yet sounds exactly the same when performing live, how he maintains that growl, at that level, I do not know!

‘Aurea Mediocritas’ oh yes, here come those meaty bass riffs, Krysthla totally own it. Jesus, you can get into a serious rhythm with this track. This is definitely an alluring track and will open up a mosh pit for sure. If you are not pumped yet, you will be. There is a taste of everything here, their original sound with added extras but not too overwhelming. It is a little gentler on the ears due to the slower speed but no less powerful. Finally, how do you possibly end such a powerful album? with ‘The Gift’! It’s the bounciest track on “Worldwide Negative” and why not eh, leaving the listener on a slight high before the ‘what the heck just happened’ kicks in! Every single second has been thought about, every second. I had my arms up in the air at the end with nothing but complete respect. You really need this track to balance out the rest of the album and it works perfectly.

When you step out of your comfort zone and sprinkle some modern extras, you don’t always get the results you expect but Krysthla pulled me in immediately, got my attention and further excited the more I listened. It has left me on an absolute high and feeling I can literally take on the world. Every single track on this album is gold dust! It becomes overwhelming when the album finishes. Every single beat, riff, vocal, in fact everything has had a vast amount of time, effort and passion put into it and it’s massively better than their previous albums. I have sat here for ages to try and find a flaw but I just can’t. It’s musical evolution at its finest. From the moment you press play you are hitting another level of extreme metal.

“Worldwide Negative” will be released on 16th August so get yourself a copy and take note. If you can get your ass to Bloodstock Festival and watch them smash the Main Stage then do it! I have so much love and respect for them; they could not have done a better job at destroying my ears. A massive well done Krysthla, I am a happy Tammy.

TRACKLISTING:
01. Negative
02. Reawaken
03. Grief Is New Love
04. Zero Sum Game
05. White Castles
06. Psalm Of Heartlessness
07. Aurea Mediocritas
08. The Gift

LINKS:
http://www.krysthla.co.uk/
https://shor.by/krysthla
https://www.facebook.com/krysthla/

https://www.instagram.com/krysthla_band/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwjHzxNfTUqNaZ9wshfKQMQ

Promo Pic

 

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Tammy Lomax and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with Crejuvent

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EMQ’s with Crejuvent

Hi Everyone. Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Liverpool, UK based Extreme Metal solo act Crejuvent. Huge thanks to Freddy for taking part!

What is your name, what do you play and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

My name is Freddy and I play metal music. I’m a musician based in Liverpool UK, I’ve been playing and producing bands for many years and Crejuvent is my main solo project so to speak. I had the idea for it a while back, releasing a set of demos in 2015 and my debut EP in 2017. I’m now gearing up for the release of a new single titled Vesti La Giubba coming out on May 18th.

How did you come up with your band name?

It came to me in a dream. In it I was fighting off giant flies with a huge sword in an apocalyptic like scenario, and once I had beaten them all a local village offered me the services of all their women as a thank you. As I was gearing up for the inevitable month long orgy that would ensue by renovating my golden palace, I found in the foundations a stone tablet that read Crejuvent.
Oh wait that wasn’t a dream, that was my 19th birthday. Ah well.

What country are you from and what is the metal scene like there?

I’m half Italian and half Brazilian, although I grew up in the US, in Italy, in the Netherlands, and have been based in the UK for the past 7 years. So I don’t know how to answer your question really. The fact that I’m not rolling in cash on a daily basis leads me to believe that the metal scene in all of these countries is terrible, but that can’t be accurate.

What is your latest release (Album, EP, Single, Video)

I will be releasing a new single on May 18th titled Vesti La Giubba along with a video. It’s a cover of the famous aria from Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci opera. It’s a piece about love, betrayal, and insanity. It’s also the first time I sing in Italian so I’m quite excited to release it. With the single, I’ll be releasing a B-side called Blue Spirit. It’s a 8 and a half minute epic and it’s one of my more intricate songs and I feel it really showcases my songwriting as its strongest.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Devin Townsend has been my biggest influence by far, and I think it shows. But I talk about him loads already so I’ll mention a few others. Fleshgod Apocalypse have been a huge influence too, as is probably obvious from the fact that I’m doing a metal cover of an opera piece. I’m big into my technical death metal so bands like Obscura, Cynic, Beyond Creation, amongst others, have been a crucial factor in my musical development. I’ve been really getting into Leprous lately as well and have been incorporating some of those elements into my songwriting lately.

What first got you into music?

Teenage angst coupled with social rejection. Or were those a result of me getting into metal? Either ways, I needed an outlet when I was a young person and music was the safest one. Why go around smashing shit when you can listen to music that’s ABOUT smashing shit?

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

I hate working with other musicians – they only hold me back…!

Nah I kid. I collaborate lots with other people, and if there’s one thing I’ve learned is that everyone has a different way of working on music and collaborating. Whilst I could SAY that I want to work with some of my biggest influences, truth is our way of working on music might not yield fruitful. So I don’t know who I’d like to work with – I’d have to know more about how they go about their business.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

I played Metal Days a in 2017 and that was so much fun – it’s already my favourite festival ever and the fact that I got to play it was amazing and would love to do it again. Otherwise, one of those cruise ship type festivals look like they’d be fun!

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

In one of my other bands (which I think you guys are also featuring funnily enough) we got given a book by a fan that they wrote. It was…quite the read if I say so myself.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

I’m glad y’all like the music. It pleases me to hear so thanks.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Hmm I don’t know, maybe Peter Steele as I’d really like to see Type O Negative live. But only if he comes back EXACTLY the way he is right now, half decayed and everything.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

I love performing and writing stuff, it’s the biggest high for me. I also get to see a lot of the country while touring and I get to meet so many awesome people. Unfortunately, that means I get to meet a lot of un-awesome people too. It can also take quite a toll on you as a person, both physically and emotionally.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

This isn’t exclusive to the music industry, unfortunately it’s how a lot of things work in this world, but I hate all the blatant ass kissing that needs to be done to get anywhere and the “networking” for the sake of networking. I suck at socializing and talking to people and I’d like to just let the music do the talking. But unfortunately the band that can barely string more than 3 chords together to write mediocre music will get further than I can because their singer knows how to be “friends” with the right people.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Alien by Strapping Young Lad.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

I like CD’s, I find vinyls to be a bit of a novelty but people like them so that’s cool. And why download these days when you can just stream?

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Playing at Metal Days and Winter Days of Metal last year was pretty cool, it’s definitely high up there on the list. Everything about it was great, the atmosphere, the bands, the weather, even our drummer dislocating his shoulder.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I’d be the village idiot.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

I would invite John Mulaney five times.

What’s next for the band?

As I mentioned before, I got a single coming out on May 18th, and it’s gonna kick ass! After that I’m in talks with some people to potentially get a full band together for this project but that’s still all just in the works. In the meantime I’ll keep on writing more material and see where it all goes!

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

Crejuvent is on Facebook primarily, but I have my own personal Instagram and Youtube channel that I use for Crejuvent as well. I’m also on Bandcamp where you can check out all of my releases, at least the ones that aren’t on Spotify and stuff.
https://www.facebook.com/Crejuvent/
https://crejuvent.bandcamp.com/

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

As a non British person, I don’t understand why they are even called cakes. Were they giant at one point? That shit is clearly a biscuit of some variety.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thank you! Be sure to follow Crejuvent on Facebook, Instagram, and Youtube and keep an eye out for Vesti La Giubba coming out on May 18th!! Byeeeeee!

 

Crejuvent PR2

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

 

 

Anaal Nathrakh/Akercocke/Khost – The Asylum, Birmingham – 05/04/2019

Gig Poster

Anaal Nathrakh
Akercocke
Khost
The Asylum, Birmingham – 05/04/2019
Review and Pictures by Sheri Bicheno

Having just had my chat with Dave Hunt of Anaal Nathrakh – myself, Jim Beerman and Dave Wilkins headed into The Asylum to get our metal on.

The Asylum downstairs main stage is dark, big and already starting to get full and down the front at the barrier, a crowd of people eager to get a similar amount of metal on is starting to take shape.

Khost
First band Khost are from Birmingham and if you like your doom, these are the guys to check out. They appear on the stage as a two man act with guitars, synths and raw, deep vocals, chanting and satanic growls, like something you’d expect from a horror movie ritual. Their track played live ‘Subliminal Chloroform Violation’ is a clear example of this. Stage presence is kept dark and smoky with an air of mystery about them. The drawn out, deep and bassy strings deliver an intoxicating feeling with the growling and backdrop of chants and cymbals. I really enjoyed watching these guys perform and liked that the doom and elements of black metal were not compromised.

01 Khosthttps://www.facebook.com/khostband/

Akercocke
Whilst waiting, Jason Mendonca goes along the front line and addresses everyone to ask if they are “READY FOR SOME METAL”. Behind me, the room has filled right up, jam packed to the very back – moving to another spot would be a challenging option here… and the hype is getting more and more intense as the stage fills with red lights and smoke, a red mist effect, and…

Akercocke take to the stage, Sam Loynes smashes right into the long drone of the keyboard synths and then the guitars and bass are let loose on the low and melodic intro to ‘Horns of Baphomet’. Immediately, Jason’s vocals are delivered to us at their full pelt, it is almost majestic. We get a combination of high growls & beautiful whale song type vocals through lyrics “I can hear you calling” to low & deep growling plus the emotion of the wailing for horrifying effect.

David Gray’s drums are masterful, the backbone of what holds Akercocke in place – everything just fits perfectly with the tempo and pace of vocals, strings and synths. How Akercocke can cram so many elements of their style into each song, from one extreme to the other and make it not sound like it’s thrown together is mind blowing.

We are then taken into the song ‘Verdelet’, it is fast paced and energetic. The pit behind me is already going crazy and the crowd surfers have begun. Everyone is having an utterly wicked time. As the set goes on, we get a proper journey through what Akercocke are about, performance wise. How they blend through tones that are hard, fast, energetic walloping into some gentle, progressive and beautifully paced moments to creating devastating emotion, are displayed throughout.

02 Akercockehttps://www.facebook.com/akercockeofficial/

ANAAL NATHRAKH
They enter through a dark mist and the UTTER DESPAIR begins straight off the bat. Behind me, a sea of people are going absolutely mental – this is Anaal Nathrakh’s first home town show for a while and they are welcomed back with so much passion from their viewers. It’s bloody beautiful.

Upon entering the stage, the presence of these guys is something to behold. The utter energy that radiates off the stage… strings and beats just bounce off each other, the pace is ever changing and brings a new vibe around every corner. Dave Hunt’s vocals demonstrate demonic low growls and high pitched wails to a beautifully balanced range… all at once! The concepts that come out in the lyrics are of utter relevance, addressing the global issues of poverty, warfare and depravity.

The live track that stood out for me is ‘Forward’, taken from their most recent album “A New Kind Of Horror”.

Lyrics:
“Forward!
Forget your fear, the guns at your back scream
Forward!
Who gives a fuck if your enemy’s starving?
Forward!
No place for cowards, up and over
Forward!
Your country needs you, so start killing”.

Throughout their set, bodies are floating amongst the crowd and pints are flying from every direction. There’s a guy next to me that tries his hand at sitting on the barriers and getting his friends to catch him as he falls – which hilariously and epically fails but, unscathed, he emerges back to thrashing around in the room sized pit behind me… cue where Jim Beerman’s famous “Nathrakhccident” happened… but it’s ok, he found a new tooth. 🙂

If you’re not familiar with Anaal Nathrakh, now is a good time to get your ears into these guys. – mixing elements of progressive, death, black and extreme metal, they are a force to be reckoned with!

03 Anaal Nathrakhhttps://www.facebook.com/Anaalnathrakhofficial/

Rick Here;
Thanks Sheri, sounds like everyone had a fabulous night! If you haven’t then you definitely need to check out all three bands!

 

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Sheri Bicheno and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Dave Hunt of Anaal Nathrakh

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Interview with Dave Hunt of Anaal Nathrakh
By Sheri Bicheno

Good Evening – Rick Here. On 5th April Sheri was lucky enough to go to The Asylum in Birmingham to cover the Anaal Nathrakh / Akercocke Co-headline show. Whilst there she also got the chance to interview Anaal Nathrakh’s vocalist Dave Hunt. I’d like to thank both Dave and Sheri for a great interview. Read on…

I was invited to Uprawr Studios, Birmingham to have a chat with Dave Hunt, vocalist of extreme metal band Anaal Nathrakh. He greeted me warmly and we went to find a place to chat away from the hustle and busy sounds. We found an empty studio and with one chair between us, no one was rude enough to take it.

Sheri: “ANAAL NATHRAKH! That is from a film is it not?”

Dave Yes, it’s from Excalibur.

Sheri: In the 80’s. No?
Dave Well, I first saw it in the 80’s – I think early 80’s is when it came out. It’s just a film that me and Mick both liked. It’s all it was. There’s no great significance to it to begin with, because when we started out doing stuff, we were just knocking about in the front room of a… shit house (laughs). So we weren’t thinking “what would you like your band to be called when you’re on the bill at Wacken” or ya know, nothing like that was in our heads. It was just some name for a thing haha.

Sheri: Dark sounding, really haha.

Dave: Yeah haha that’ll do. But by the same token, I’ve said this in interviews before, what’s a Metallica? No one knows what a Metallica is because it’s just a bollocks word that’s just a name for a band. Ours has slightly more significance than that, so in comparison to that, we’re doing alright! Haha!
It’s part of this spell that’s used in the film, it’s a very destructive force that the actor who plays Merlin, he had a great voice… he did refer to it as The DRAGON haha!

Sheri: I’ve friends who have seen it who recommend it. So you guys have been going for 20 years now?

Dave: Apparently…

Sheri: Haha does it feel that long?

Dave: No it doesn’t, that’s the thing! We didn’t know. We’ve never paid much attention to things like that and we did this album and people are going “You’ve been going for 20 years now” and we’re like fucking hell really! I didn’t know. So to us, it’s never seemed that we’ve been going for more than about 4 or 5 years really.

Sheri: That’s really humble…?

Dave: Well, it’s the way it is, we don’t notice it, we’re not really self grandiosing and we’re not very reflective about what we’ve done…

Sheri: You’re just loving it?

Dave: Yeah, we’re just interested in what we’re doing now and what we’re doing next. So when I say apparently… haha. It’s true. I am now aware of it, but we weren’t until recently.

Sheri: You are now on tour with the guys in Akercocke… I’ve known Sam for a good few years, brilliant bunch of guys… you kicked things off in Bristol the other day?

Dave: Yeah, it’s only a Tourette, the one in Bristol and then the three over the course of this weekend – it’s not some great big long six week night liner affair, but it’s been nice to play with them, they are a good bunch of lads, we’ve been known and for years we’ve played with Sam and Dave haha! I like the idea of calling them Sam and Dave… I got an email that was addressed to me and it said “Dear Sam and Dave”, cuz I like my Motown and Soul music that Sam and Dave were, ya know, “Hold On, I’m Coming” and all that… But yeah, obviously we’ve played with them and the guys in Voices…

Sheri: I do love Voices!

Dave: Yeah, we’ve played with them a few times. It’s been nice playing with them and it kind of feels overdue cuz we’ve known them for years and we’ve played once or twice with Mistress when me and Mick used to be in another band called Mistress. So yeah, finally playing properly together like this, it’s kinda cool.

Sheri: It is cool, because you do compliment each other as artists and are compatible with each other.

Dave: There’s this thing in really early neuter, it draws a distinction because he used to go on about Ancient Greek culture and stuff, it draws a distinction between the Apollonian and Dionysian, stuff that takes after Apollo – and stuff that takes after Dionysian. I think that, in a weird way, sort of limits the difference between us and Akercocke. Apollo is clearly defined lines, it’s architecture so, in terms of its application…Dionysus is more drinking and dancing and no clear lines and the orgiastic experiences, they tend to be a bit more technical and a bit more sort of careful with the way their style of their playing and stuff like that and we’re a bit more punky and anarchic… we sort of compliment one another quite well.

Sheri: Two extremes on either side of the spectrum. I hear you. As you’ve have been going for this amount of time and with your experience… do you have any advice for aspiring bands that want to keep ideas fresh within their writing, inspiration and such? There isn’t a bad Anaal Nathrakh album so have you got any wisdom for other bands that you want to bestow?

Dave: In respect to younger bands… no. Haha. But also the opposite of no. I sort of actively haven’t denied them any advice within those lines. There’s loads of advice they should be given when they first start out. Haha. Most of it, in my experience, revolves around getting legal counsel when it comes to signing to record deals and I mean that’s in just one specific instance. But generally, just in general getting someone who knows that business side of things, just to make sure you don’t fuck up. Because no one wants to concentrate on that… that’s not why anyone does any of this. But you will get hamstrung by people who do concentrate on that and you know, aren’t necessarily interested in your creative output. So some advice along those lines, make sure someone is taking care of all that for you. They are doing so that you don’t have to think about it so much, THAT kind of advice, yeah. Know what PRS is, know what mechanical loyalties are, know what things like that are so that you don’t have to think about it. But on more of the creative side, certainly in terms of insuring longevity or anything like that… no. Because… if you don’t already have the answers to that, then just stop!

Sheri: There’s no point…You have to take your own journey?

Dave: I think, yes. You should have that in your mind, heart, and soul, whatever it is. Somewhere within you, you should have some kind of answer to that, even if you can’t put it into words before you pick up a guitar, before you write a song. Mick said to me once, as he records bands and stuff, he says sometimes he gets the impression some people aren’t sure why they’re doing it. One thing you have to do when recording bands is to help them get into the right head space to produce a good performance – and that can involve a conversation you know, remember what it is, what is this song about for you and all that kind of thing. I think if you struggle to answer questions like that then you’re doing something wrong in a more fundamental way. Then again maybe I’m just talking bollocks! Haha!

Sheri: Not necessarily at all. One of the things that I don’t see eye to eye in the music industry with is, you know, I work with festivals and a number of underground bands and there is a lot of exploitation going around with a number of people who are kinda out for themselves. I get that a business is to be run but doing things for the love of it is more rewarding…

Dave: I think so too. At the same time though, if you do things for the love of it, you’re laying yourself open sometimes to being exploited by people…

Sheri: And this is why you were saying you have to be clued up…?

Dave: Yeah exactly and that I say the two sides do have to go hand in hand. You have to know what you’re doing on the annoying business side just to make sure that someone isn’t taking advantage of you – but beyond that minimum, you shouldn’t have to worry.

Sheri: This in itself is good advice. So… your vocals – let’s talk about your vocals… they’re very diverse. Do you coach and stuff or…

(Dave shakes head sheepishly and grins)

Sheri: Ahh! Self-taught! I mean it’s very low, very high, very deep and then very raw all at once. A good example is ‘Reek of Fear’ – I was listening to that the other day – how do you go from one extreme to the other?

Dave: Badly usually haha! Maybe practice haha. I’ve always been guided only by what I thought sounded right. Sounds like the appropriate thing to do. I’ve never paid any attention to whether or not I could do it. Cuz if you try something and it doesn’t work, you just do something else. So you give it a go. But beyond that, I’m terrible! Haha, I haven’t got a clue about technique or anything like that. In the past couple of years, I’ve started doing a bit of warming up before gigs and that’s about all I’ve done… and that causes problems sometimes, you know, it can hurt and stuff like that. But… I’d rather have it that way. Because I’ve attempted at times to exercise a bit of technique or control or anything like that. Not that I know massively what I’m doing haha but you can find things on YouTube or whatever that tell you what to do. I think it’s antithetical to doing music properly, personally. I can’t stand the idea of being halfway through a gig and the thing that’s in the forefront of my mind is “hmmm, how’s my technique?” Just doesn’t seem right. And it’s… maybe you can get good enough at technique that it ceases to be something that enters your head and even though you’re doing it properly, you’re still thinking about what I would think are the right things. I don’t think Pavarotti struggled thinking about technique. He was able to stay focused on what he was doing because his technique was flawless in the first place. Or close enough to it. I’m not good enough for technique to do that, I’d have to be thinking about it and that to me detracts from what you’re doing. To me it’s more important to have the method acting sort of a mind set about it. It comes out the way it does because you felt the way you did. Not because you studiously practiced.

Sheri: With feeling behind it… and that’s how it should be?

Dave: I think so, yes. The thing is… that ends you up with a sore throat haha!

Sheri: And a multitude of Vocalzone haha?

Dave: Yeah haha! I’m not saying that is the right way to do it but that’s the only way I can…

Sheri: I think that’s probably good advice as well. I mean I have friends that are in younger bands that DO have that barrier there about their technique.

Dave: Music is about expression to me, if it’s not expression then you’re doing it wrong.

Sheri: This leads me onto… Where is the most interesting or most memorable place that you have played?

(Dave pauses for a moment in thought and laughs)

Sheri: I know you’ve been to many exotic corners of the world haha!

Dave: We’ve played a few…haha! So yeah… trying to think of something… I mean we not long came back, before Bristol last week, the show we did before that was in Brisbane in Australia. That was, in Australia, was sort of on the way home almost, from Japan. Four shows in Japan. Not to overlook Australia which is a wonderful and fascinating place in its own right, haha, but Japan being so exotic and so different to the West… especially in Osaka. We went around a few places and that can be weird, sometimes you go to a bit and it looks, sort of like… like England? But you know big cities all over the world, you know, big tall concrete buildings, great big state roads, but then you go to some places and the back streets of Osaka are not anything like that. Some places, you’re just like… I really am somewhere else… Cuz there are stages of difference. If you go from here to Holland, you know, then in Holland the buildings look a bit different and the people have a certain atmosphere about them that people do in every place and everywhere. But other than that, it’s mostly the same. Or you go to Germany and it’s very very similar, the food is quite similar and all that. But then if you go a little bit further to say, Greece or Bulgaria or somewhere like that. The writing is different on the road signs. You know, there are tell-tale signs that this isn’t the same place. Then it seems to me, having been around to a lot of places, possibly the strongest difference in that sort of thing is being translated somewhere in the back streets of Osaka, haha. Because you don’t know what anyone’s saying haha. You don’t know what any of the shops are because they’re selling things or doing things that you don’t get back home. You don’t know what any of the signs say, you don’t know what any of the food is. The smells are around you know…?

Sheri: And that can be really cool actually. Just kinda getting lost and not really knowing where you are can be one of life’s most thrilling experiences.

Dave: It can be yeah! It does depend where haha! I was in Bogota in Colombia with Benediction and I was tempted to just go for a wander. I went to a place in Copacabana in Bolivia, it was about 3 or 4 in the morning and I was a bit drunk…and I thought I’d go for a good walk, go for a look around. The local guy as I was walking off, just grabbed my arm and was like “Dont go that way…go that way” (points to the opposite direction) and I was like right… and then it sort of dawns on you, actually I’m not in Kansas anymore and apparently down there, wherever down there was, was dangerous especially if you were foreign and stuff. The difference is sometimes of questionable benefit to you haha, you could end up in trouble kind of thing… but for the most part, difference is a good thing.

Sheri: Your most recent album was released at the end of September last year, it’s still pretty young but has had great reception, and one of my favourite songs from it is actually ‘Forward’!

Dave: Ok, cool!

Sheri: There are elements of, I think a World War One kind of vibe… can you elaborate on that a bit?

Dave: Yeah, World War 1 was one of the big aspects of inspiration for it. Because it was 2018, obviously it was 100 years since the First World War and although there had been a significant amount of commemoration of it, I thought culturally in this country, we had undersold the centenary of the First World War. Some good stuff on Radio 4 actually, they had a day to day series called Home Front and stuff like that. I mean there were things but it seems to have passed a bit more easily for me. One of the things I remember from school was some of the war poetry we studied. Which was our first exposure to it, I don’t know if kids nowadays, I don’t know if you did it at school, but it was standard…

Sheri: Haha I’m 32 this year, we studied pieces of scripture…!

Dave: There you go haha yeah, well I’m 10 years older than you haha, so things might have changed. But apparently not no, haha. But one of the things that made a profound impression on me from that was a poem called Dolce et Decorum Est – and that is basically a poem, a first-hand account of being in a Chlorine Gas attack.

Sheri: Wow.

Dave: Yeah…it’s not…fun. There’s another one by Siegfried Sassoon and the authors of those poems knew one another in real life…and Sassoon who did “Aftermath” which appears on the album, basically got to know Wilfred Owen, who wrote Dolce et Decorum Est, in hospital and begged him not to go back out into the war. But he did and was killed seven days almost to the hour before the Armistice was signed…so one week, on the 4th of November… and to know that was his story of this you know, poor sensitive boy who was thrown into Hell… and to read the words of that poem and others like it… that seems to me to capture something that was absent from the commemorations and centenary. So it felt fitting for us to include some of that for inspiration on the album.

Sheri: That’s a good concept to have for the album, it’s not something that many people would look into, and things are looked into on a much larger scale…

Dave: Yeah and one thing that struck me about reflecting on all of that, because first of all, the poetry and some of the art was pretty impactful and profound you see, but it was also the parallels between then and now, or last year – so for example, the mention of use of Chlorine Gas in that poem, Chlorine Gas had been used in warfare before – I am no war historian, I’m aware that it had been used before – but not on that scale, because no one would do that, because that’s just too horrific! … until they did it. Then at the time that we were putting some of the album together, the Satan 2 rocket system was unveiled by Putin. This is a continental ballistic missile system capable of delivering payloads anywhere on the globe, so i gather, including nuclear ones. It just struck me how strong the parallel was between that and Chlorine Gas. We can put a nuclear bomb anywhere on the planet – but we wouldn’t because that would just be too awful! In just the same way that Chlorine Gas was… and at the same time, Chlorine Gas was being used as an interior, still. Like, 100 years later, we are still doing this to people. So yeah, a series of parallels seem to crop up between that and the modern day as well. It was kind of like having settled on that idea of part inspiration, it was the gift that kept on giving, and you know, there’s loads more stuff that just falls out of it once you start to think about it. So there’s quite a lot going on the album haha! Conceptually speaking.

Sheri: Fantastic! Is there anything you can let us know that might be going on for this for you guys? What are you up to?

Dave: I mean obviously we’re doing shows and that so we’re not in the studio at the moment. At the moment, we had the last album, A New Kind Of Horror – with the last one that we had under the deal that we had with the record company – so technically, we are sort of not signed at the minute – I would expect there to be an offer to carry on haha!

Sheri: Absolutely, it’s not gonna be long at all.

Dave: No, I wouldn’t have thought so, we’re sort of trying to figure out what we’re going to do. So we’ve got these gigs lined up but we’ve also got a load of live audio from the Japan and Australia tour – so we might put together a live release or we might keep it back for bonus tracks on stuff. Other than that, everything’s sort of up in the air – and we quite like that! Haha! I’m not sure what’s gonna happen next but we’ll find out!

 

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Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Sheri Bicheno and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.