Anaal Nathrakh – Endarkenment

Anaal Nathrakh – Endarkenment
Metal Blade Records
Release Date: 02/10/20
Running Time: 41:04
Review by Steven Hooke
9/10

There may not be a band that completely and totally summarises the state of planet Earth in 2020 quite like Brummie extreme metal titans Anaal Nathrakh. There’s been plenty of punk albums this year that rag on US and UK politics, social commentaries and global injustices, and there exists a near-limitless supply of blood-curdling grindcore, black metal, death metal, etc. albums to really amplify the feelings of internal frustration, Mick Kenney and Dave Hunt though bring together both sides of the turgid, decaying coin and leave you constantly coming back for more.

And it’s been pretty much the case since their inception over 20 years ago. Although Anaal Nathrakh have offered a rare glimpse into their lyrics for the latest album, they have traditionally remained reserved and protective of them, with tr00 necro experts piecing together unofficial lyric sheets, depicting the inner-monologue of Hunt’s mind as he lambasts religion, modern society and political leaders all in the name of a false freedom. The title track – which both opens the album and was used as the lead single prior to the album’s release – shows no shred of backing down, admonishing people for their callous mindset of “I side with whomever gives me a better reward” instead of looking at the bigger picture of how any particular declaration, political or otherwise, helps a broader audience.

It’s a real, organic response to the world. Hunt even states “personally, I feel more cynical, more bitter, with a greater sense that the world is fucked, and is continually re-fucked by people who have no idea what they are doing.” It’s all stuff that’s happening today too, ‘Punish Them’ acts as a short but scathing commentary to the situation involving a British woman in Malaysia being sentenced to death for allegedly smuggling drugs into the country (reportedly against her will). As barbaric as it seems to condemn someone to death for a crime even in 2020, the infamous comment sections of newspaper pages showing people to have no compassion or empathy when dealing with a person’s life. ‘Singularity’ deals with the human race’s innate ability to destroy itself, and that we’re losing our own identities to artificial intelligence, social media culture, all the while allowing a small room full of people dictate the behaviour of entire countries just to please a small fraction.

As previously stated, it’s not just lyrically where A.N. excel at bringing forth clouds of despondency; always expanding the realms and limitations of black metal to create images of horror in their sound, “Endarkenment” continues the trend of “let’s make something really bastard heavy, add a melodic bit that people can sing along to, but sing in a King Diamond-falsetto and sound like a ravenous harpy”.

Again, the title track is an early example of this as well as a prime example of Mick Kenney’s ability to tell a story through music and structure. Pitched as the complete antithesis of ‘enlightenment’, the high-pitched shrill vocal echoes Hunt’s clean delivery of “endarkenment”, the encroaching evil in an already chaotic and unstable environment. ‘The Age of Starlight Ends’ is another great example of this, with the pitch of the chord progressions steadily increasing, only to drop on the bellow of the chorus.

The deeper into the album you go, the more experiences you are sure to find. ‘Thus, Always, To Tyrants’ is a song that sounds like it’s collapsing in on itself, with some exceptional guitar work from Kenney for good measure, ‘Libidinous (A Pig With Cocks In Its Eyes)’ and ‘Create Art, Though The World May Perish’ sound plucked from an alternative universe where Niklas Kvarforth pursued a career in power metal and ‘Beyond Words’ is dissonant noise that make Author & Punisher blush.

“Endarkenment” is a triumphant onslaught of aggression. An ever-elaborate world of discordance and melody, knee-jerk reactions and patience, fear and, well, more fear. But if nothing else, it is a testament to a band 20+ years and 11 albums in that can remain concise and relevant to the world around them, but to also maintain such a profound level of quality in their delivery.

Anaal. Fucking. Nathrakh.

TRACKLISTING:
01. Endarkenment
02. Thus, Always, To Tyrants
03. The Age Of Starlight Ends
04. Libidinous (A Pig With Cocks In Its Eyes)
05. Beyond Words
06. Feeding The Death Machine
07. Create Art, Though The World May Perish
08. Singularity
09. Punish Them
10. Requiem

LINE-UP:
V.I.T.R.I.O.L. – Vocals
Mick Kenney – All instruments

LINKS:

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Steven Hooke and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with DEATH PLAGUE

EMQ’s with DEATH PLAGUE

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Queensland, Australian based Extreme Black/Death Metal band, Death Plague. Huge thanks to vocalist, Dam Kel for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Dam Kel, I’m the vocalist of extreme metal band Death Plague, from the Sunshine coast of Australia. The band formed in 2017 and we’re a 5-piece act. In these early years we have already done a demo/EP called “Smear Your Blood”, we have a new album coming out this year, and we have played many shows and mini fests , as well as organising and running our own shows and mini fest.

How did you come up with your band name?

At the time we wrote our first lot of songs, we felt plagued by our own creation. And for myself personally, the band had become my reason to die, so if this is the last project I do then I’m taking it to the end. Death Plague is who we are, it’s our way of life and we are in it until the end.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We are Australian based band and Brisbane is the main city near us. The scene is ok but can be fairly hard to judge as to how gigs will plan out. There is a solid following, but with the way the restrictions are with licenced venues it makes it very hard to get people motivated to come out and make a night of it.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

So, the last release we did, the ‘Parasitic Homicide’ music video, was a while ago, however, stay tuned for our upcoming tracks. It’s heavier then before and really showcases us as a full-on machine.

Who have been your greatest influences?

My greatest influences have been Wednesday 13 (not just the music but the amount of work he puts in, the guys a freak) Satyricon, Soulfly, Psyclon Nine, basically anything that’s creative and catchy.

What first got you into music?

Oh man, just the feeling of being able to express yourself on that kind of a platform! It’s absolutely awesome being able to make a connection with people live or even through recording.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Locally (Australia underground wise) I’m currently collaborating with members of both Awful Noise and Terra Mortem. I think international it’s a massive playing field and hopefully we can collaborate with many different bands out there.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Definitely would have to say Wacken. I know, reach for the sky’s, but that place is just a freak of the best talent the world has to offer in metal, it’s my Graceland.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

A hug (laugh) ok back story… At a show, some member of the crowd went to knuckles me, I did and said into the mic “is that how humans connect?” then another member from down the back ran up and said “no this is how we connect!” and gave me a hug. Very weird moment but hey, if that’s not metal…. I don’t know what is!!

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Album is almost finished, not too much longer! We will be seeing you all very soon and the party will be massive!

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

I don’t think I’d bring one back to be honest… they would be cranky, pissed off and smell really fucking bad. I think we should let their legacy live on. They were who they were and that’s what makes them special in almost every way.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

I love being creative and connecting with people and crowds. I don’t think I hate anything… oh… I stand corrected, I hate having to wait for our own stuff to be ready to showcase. I just wanna get it out there and have some fun.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Downloads. All the way, they should not be allowed. Yes, it’s convenience but it’s worth nothing to the eyes on the computer screen. The physical copy always has cool designs and a booklet and is just… so much more worth it. Can’t sign a computer screen for someone. Think about it…

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Soulfly “Dark Ages”. So many great tracks, never gets boring.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Yea… I’d say CDs, unless it’s great vinyl. Cassette tape was never really a great idea. I think it was good for the time but yet it was never timeless.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

By far it would be an interstate show in a place called Newcastle! Best crowd, shot them beers (like a whole fucking keg), it was incredible just how much love we got from that place.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I think Marketing. I’m creative and always trying to do some weird stuff with posters and designs and how to reach people. It’s all really fun to me.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

My band members, they are the best mates and the strongest team I’ve ever had in my life.

What’s next for the band?

Studio time, upcoming shows, and focusing on where we go next and how we achieve that. It’s always good to have goals and accomplish them.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.facebook.com/pg/deathplagueww

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

They are clearly biscuits, although, maybe we are wrong about that as well. Maybe the are not either cake or biscuits, one of those questions that will keep you up at night that’s for sure.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Stay tuned, some awesome stuff coming, support your local scene and help the bands make your life a little bit less sucky It’s ok to escape and shut off the world while listening to music. Stay safe.

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQs with BLOOD OF ANGELS

EMQs with BLOOD OF ANGELS

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Tampa, Florida based Extreme Metal band, Blood of Angels. Huge thanks to guitarist, Aaron Robinson, for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Aaron Robinson, I am the guitarist for Blood of Angels. I formed the band in October of 2015. Our debut EP, entitled “Rise of the Fallen Gods”, did well and won a few awards.

How did you come up with your band name?

Blood of Angels was a name that I had in mind for a couple of years before I formed the band. The name really suits us. As far as a business sense, it’s a name that works with metal music that does not pigeonhole us into a single sub-genre. It is easy to remember. From a personal side, we are a band that does not subscribe to any form of organized religion. Since most religions have this mythological idea of angels, spilling of their blood is a metaphorical statement to abandon organized faiths.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We are from Tampa, Florida USA. Our Tampa metal scene is resurging. You can see the building blocks being put back into place. We have a great studio in town that loves punk and metal music. The venues that started in the 80’s, that are still around, are getting great attendance for the scene. It is fantastic to see the Tampa metal scene make a comeback.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

We released our debut EP “Rise of the Fallen Gods” in 2017. We’ve recently completed our new album “Failure of Faith.” We hope to have a release date soon.

Who have been your greatest influences?

We are influenced by Slayer, Cradle of Filth, System of a Down, and Dark Tranquillity.

What first got you into music?

My dad was a fan of the early metal bands. Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and Blue Oyster Cult, among others. Listening to heavy rock was something we bonded on. When I was ten my dad picked up the Ozzy Osbourne “Randy Rhodes Tribute Album.” I became obsessed with that album. I just fell in love with Randy’s guitar playing. I wanted to be able to do it as well.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

They are really is not one musician that I would love to collaborate over any other. I am always open to create new songs with different artists. Recently we did a collaboration with hip-hop artist Amiss Omega. We did a killer track with hip-hop blended with black metal influenced riffs and drums.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Wacken Festival for sure. That is the grand-daddy of all metal festivals!

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Nothing weird, I got some cool friendship bracelets. Also, a Viking style drinking horn.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

We cannot wait to get on the road and see everyone. Hopefully, our tour with Laang in August will be able to go on.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

That is a tough question. Besides Randy Rhodes, probably Jim Morrison. He really understood philosophy and I am sure the conversations we would have would be transformative. I would be interested in what he would say about the current situation.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

I love connecting with people who love music as much as we do. I do not like having to buy-on to tours and festivals.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

As I stated in my last answer. I do not like having to buy-on to tours and festivals. I do not see the reason behind charging bands $2,500 to play a festival.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Dark Tranquillity – “Where Death Is Most Alive.”

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Since I am a 90’s kid, I really love the polished sound of CD’s.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

The Tampa Death Fest last October. It had an awesome and very receptive crowd. We had a great show.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I would have pursued a career in academia. I would have done research and published books on ancient societies.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Kerry King, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Daniel Tosh, Steve Harris, and Johnny Depp.  It would be one eclectic dinner party.

What’s next for the band?

To release our new album “Failure of Faith” and tour as much as possible.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.bloodofangels.net
www.facebook.com/bloodofangels1
www.twitter.com/bloodofangels1
www.instagram.com/bloodofangels
www.youtube.com/bloodofangels
www.numberonemusic.com/bloodofangels
www.reverbnation.com/bloodofangels1

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Both, it’s hard to decide!

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thank you for the opportunity to connect with your audience. We hope to see everyone as soon as Covid-19 passes.

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Trevor Strnad of The Black Dahlia Murder

Interview with Trevor Strnad of The Black Dahlia Murder
By Dark Juan

Good afternoon, you beautiful bunch of misfits and miscreants! I trust you have been following the gospel of Dark Juan and have given your livers a workout worthy of Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime? Have you been defiling with wanton and base lusts the bodies of those closest to you as you have been exiled for the good of the realm? If not, I WANT DETAILED REPORTS OF WHY NOT ON MY DESK THIS AFTERNOON! If there was ever a time for peace and love to flourish it’s now, boys, girls and persons of other genders. I request and require that you show love to everybody. Love is the law.

In other news, I spoke to one of my musical heroes and it was surprisingly NOT the fucking car crash I expected it to be, considering I am an enthusiastic and somewhat demented amateur music journo. Couple this with an accent thicker than the mud at the bottom of a drain and a sense of humour that could charitably described as baroque and you might consider that Mr. TREVOR FUCKING STRNAD OF THE BLACK FUCKING DAHLIA FUCKING MURDER actually deigning to speak to me and being a consummate gentleman throughout was something of a minor miracle. He happily appeared to be able to put up with all kinds of amateur nonsense, such as a Northern monkey rapidly riffling through notes and simultaneously soiling himself and Lord Igor Egbert Bryan Clown-Shoe Cleavage-Hoover alternately yowling, barking, meowing and for one glorious moment mooing. He did this with grace, class and bonhomie. Trevor did, not Igor. Igor’s a twat. I present to you all, my Church of the Poisoned Mind, the verbatim conversation we had, INCLUDING my deeply embarrassing fangirling.

I wonder whether animals can have species dysphoria? It would explain much about Igor. Anyway, the “interview”…

Dark Juan: Good evening, Mr. Trevor Strnad. I’m Dark Juan and I am the ridiculously overexcited idiot responsible for the 10/10 review your album “Verminous” got from Ever-Metal.com.

Trevor fucking Strnad!!!: Ah, thanks a lot man, that’s awesome. I’m very flattered by that.

DJ: (frothing in a frankly disgraceful fashion): Mate, what a record! In fact it’s not a record; it’s a weapon, man!

TS: (Laughs ): Fuck yeah, dude. Glad you like it man.

DJ: (heart rate still not normal and running off pure adrenalin and copious amounts of cider): It’s awesome. Forgive me for being a prat because this is my first time interviewing a major metal star and I’m shitting bricks about it!

TS: (one wonders how often this man comes up against pretenders of music journalism): You’re doing good man, no worries.

DJ: (desperately trying to appear professional and failing catastrophically): “Verminous”, first of all, a total contender for record of the year as far as I am concerned.

TS: Big words there, I like hearing that, man. Thank you so much.

DJ: First time I listened to it, it was almost simplistic, but on repeated listens it opens up in front of you and you have got these polyrhythms and super complicated riffs and your vocals range from the depths of hell to taking God’s head off with a buzzsaw. It’s got everything.

TS: (struggling gamefully on and proving his professionalism considering the fact that there hasn’t been an actual QUESTION yet): It definitely has more layers to it (than previous releases) and I don’t think it reveals itself fully the first time you listen to it, you know. There’s definitely some information to unpack over time.

DJ: (Deciding that now is NOT the time to preach his own somewhat confused faith): Yeah, I get that totally. Do I detect a SLIGHT HINT of antireligiousness in there, by any chance? A tiny bit of not liking the church?

TS: (Perhaps composing a stern email to the PR company to make sure this doesn’t happen again in his head): What else is new, man?

DJ: (finally managing to marshal his confused thoughts into a form that might actually have a question in them): So, your vocal style. I’ve noticed that you have said that Carcass was/ is a major influence on you. Was that Jeff or Bill’s vocals?

TS: (the man is a legend. He hasn’t yet screamingly clawed for the end call button): Well, it’s both actually. I wanted to be able to do both vocals with one person. I know I’m not the deepest, most guttural on the low end of all the guys out there, but I’m influenced from that Bill Steer mid rangey grittiness you know. It was listening to the “Tools Of The Trade” EP, that was the first glimpse of Carcass that I had and it’s still my favourite of their output you know? I have the “Tools Of The Trade” tattoo on my arm and yeah, dude, I’ve just been aping those guys ever since (laughs) and on the song “How Very Dead” (on “ Verminous”) I was trying to sound like I have an English accent and really going for Carcass.

DJ: (on safe ground at last!): Yeah, I thought I detected a real classic Carcass vibe on “The Leather Apron’s Scorn” – my favourite song on the record.

TS: Yeah, that song’s cool man. It’s different for us. It’s kind of progressive and very groovy. There’s a lot of groovy stuff on this record which is kind of new territory for us. Yeah man, that’s a definite high point of the record for us. A very creative song.

DJ: I have been a fan of The Black Dahlia Murder since 2003 (Trevor interrupts in surprise, “NO WAY!”) Yeah, man, you’re one of my favourite singers…

TS: You’re making me blush over here!

DJ: (inappropriate sense of humour immediately making an escape out of the box it had been beaten and forced into): Never thought I’d hear a bearded man tell me that but (TS is busy laughing) this record really does transcend all your other releases to date as far as I am concerned.

TS: Thanks, man. Yeah, “Nightbringers” was such a success, and having Brandon (Ellis – lead guitar) in the fold now we have a lot of creative juice and everything was just going right so it just gave us the confidence to push things a little further than we have done in the past. We are very happy with how it came out and it feels like a very proud moment for us.

DJ: (finally behaving like a fucking journalist!): Talking of Brandon, what did he bring to the party that wasn’t there before do you think?

TS: Um, Ryan (Knight, ex-guitar) was another awesome songwriter too, so I don’t wanna slight him but Brandon has this youth and this excitement to be here amongst the band. He’s just the most creative person we have had and he’s the most musically inclined, honestly. He’s the most educated, I mean he taught himself to play guitar from different sources on the internet and has never taken a lesson in his life which might surprise a lot of people. He’s just kind of a virtuoso and he looks at music in a different way and we have all been learning a lot from the guy even though he’s the youngest member of the band – He’s wise beyond his years and he has definitely taught us a lot about songwriting and different detail you can weave into a song and to consider the very minutiae of a song and I think that’s what makes these songs special , a little more elbow grease and he’s got a unique way at looking at songcraft and I think it’s kind of affected us all and we’re just trying to keep up with the kid. He’s lifted us all up and inspired us all and he’s definitely the guy you want in your band! Just feels like a really great time in TBDM history and feels like a real high point right now.

DJ: (having nearly shat himself with relief at getting a reasonably interesting question in before his already shaky confidence falls apart): That’s something that really shines through on the record I think. That kind of indefinable something where you can just tell that people are really enjoying playing that song, that’s what shines through on “Verminous”. That’s what makes it special I think.

TS: (doubtlessly relieved to be talking about the album instead of responding to Dark Juan metaphorically prostrating himself in front of him): Right on man, I’m glad that came across. It was fun to build from the ground up. Giving Brandon more control this time, with him recording most of the record, I think was a good move and gave us more control and able to take it really slow and look at things with a microscope. I think this is going to be our recording process from here on out because it was so successful. He stepped into the band and wanted to have a big piece of the pie and be creative and in control of things and we trusted him. We trusted him a lot on “Nightbringers” during the mix and he took a lot of control then and he just showed us what he could do, so this time we trusted him with more responsibility and the record is that much better for it. He’s just that kind of take charge kind of dude, man.

DJ: “Nightbringers” was such a massive success, you were touring that for two or three years, right? I mean, touring “Verminous” is kind of on hold because of coronavirus which means you could end up touring an album that’s a year old. What does that make you feel like? Do you feel the songs will stand the test of time or do you chalk “Verminous” up to experience and record a new album for the touring cycle?

TS: Um, I still think people are going to be excited to hear the songs and they have a lot of time to listen to it and fester on it. Honestly, from our point of view being in the band, there’s nothing better that could have happened during this than drop an album. That’s the ultimate content you could have and entertain all these bored people right now. The pace of life at the moment is so freaking slow. There’s time to enjoy art and absorb it, so in a weird way I think this has turned out to be advantageous, you know? Um, it’s just that it was nothing that we could foresee but we could have got caught at the end of a record cycle with no new content or anything else to offer up so honestly it’s turned out to be the best kind of thing that could have happened, I think. Honestly, it has hurt the sales a little bit, not being able to go to the record store, also we were booked to go on tour with Testament which would have been our biggest tour ever. But I’m hoping we can just jump back into this thing and pick up our momentum where we left off and hopefully people will be excited to hear these songs.

DJ: This record, I’ve found when I listen to it, third or fourth time through, you have so many different influences on it… Instead of the straight up melodeath on previous releases, there are so many disparate influences you have managed to weld into a cohesive whole and it could all so easily have sounded like a load of metal pans falling down the stairs. Has the songwriting taken longer than usual, or is it luck or judgement?

TS: It’s a lot of years of experience of writing Black Dahlia Murder songs. In the last few years, I think the goal has been to make the most dynamic music we can make. Music that really takes you on a ride and has different emotional flavours to it and I got to agree that we did add a lot of approaches that we didn’t have before. We got songs that are pretty rock injected where we close the high hat and just rock out and we have never done that before. You have “The Wereworm’s Feast” for example which is very King Diamond influenced, very classic heavy metal feel to it. Yeah, I think this record has a lot more style and we are becoming more comfortable and spreading our wings and focusing on that aspect of it. It is definitely a cocktail of that classic Black Dahlia Murder sound but also mining from different corners of heavy metal.

DJ: (having managed to obtain the dizzy heights of competence for all of seven minutes before plunging back down into the black murk of idiocy): I finished the review off by claiming that “Verminous” is the first metal album that doesn’t need more cowbell.

TS: (Laughs): We definitely did put some rock in there! It’s Brandon’s influence. He’s not like your normal 26 year old. He’s definitely a child of the 80’s and he’s very progressive in what he writes and he has pushed us all in that direction to be more creative with what we do and lifted us up and we are all just trying to keep up with him and he’s inspired Brian (Eschbach – guitar and vocals). Brian has turned out some of the best songs he’s ever written and it’s just a great line up right now. It’s the culmination of a lot of positivity, a lot of great times together – we toured together for three years off of “Nightbringers” together and had a great time and a lot of success. We just took all of that praise for that record and the positive vibe and just pushed it into this record and it made us very creative and something that felt new for us.

DJ: (in sensible question SHOCK!): Do you know what kind of response you had with online and pre-sales? Are you selling well?

TS: (Clearly wondering what sort of madman has been allowed to talk to him this time): Yeah man, we have hit the charts pretty hard which was surprising. I have to credit a lot of it to our fan club, the Blast Fiends, they have a Facebook group that really focused on collecting Black Dahlia stuff, vinyl variants and they are just total hounds for the record! So some of those guys showed up and bought a lot of copies and they are like our unofficial street team and they have really pulled for us so we could hit the charts hard, and we made some waves in the press because of it. Even during this pandemic we are able to make waves so that’s pretty cool.

DJ: Got any words for the Blast Fiends while you’re here?

TS: Thanks a lot guys, we really appreciate it. We do this for you guys and you are a huge part of it and we have yet another victory for the Black Dahlia campaign!

DJ: (still panicking like a schoolgirl but much less obviously now): “Verminous” – The title gave me the impression you were trying to evoke the seedy underbelly of life in general. Do you want to expand on this? Are we (the metal kids and the alternative people) the kind that are creeping out of the sewers to terrify the norms?

TS: Yes, that’s how I see it, man. The world on the album cover is sort of a metaphor for our place underground, literally underground. I look at metal, and especially death metal as this kind of hidden world, a secret that most people can’t see. They can’t see the value of it, they can’t see the culture of it and they can’t see the positivity of our scene, and how it’s like our lives and it’s so important to us and it’s a secret, a hidden world and it’s a plague we’re spreading, like a plague of knowledge and an awareness, an awakening to this world of freedom from religion, creativity, free thought and unfiltered art. I mean, death metal is not made for everybody – it’s made for a select few and it’s a labour of love. If we had any delusions of trying to become rich or hugely famous we would have been a totally different kind of band. It’s an act of love and something we pride ourselves on making this music and staying extreme. This is the culmination of years of hard work, trial and error when writing in the past and I feel like we are an older, wiser band right now but also that we are still young with regard to how creative we can be. I feel like this is the opening of a new chapter where we can be more creative as a band. We’ve been together for twenty years now of history with the band, but I still feel we have another 20 years. I can’t see us doing anything else. It’s been my entire life, this band, we’ve gone so hard in one direction and Brian especially, being the other original member, and we have to just see this through. We have to keep going and I feel honoured that people have stuck around and we have had so much success and that’s a big inspiration to make our music as good as we can and to keep our fans happy. It’s a never ending thing, man, and it keeps snowballing out of control, the success of this thing and we have to honour the initial opportunity Metal Blade (record label) gave us and just push it to the hilt.

DJ: (gotta hit those clichés!): Do you view “Verminous” as your “Reign In Blood moment”, or is it more your “Show No Mercy” moment and you are going to grow bigger and more expansive?

TS: (to his eternal credit, NOT rolling his eyes at the demented Englishman): I kinda see “Nightbringers” as more like “Reign In Blood”. It was more of an attack, attack all the time record with a lot of information crammed into it. More of a barrage, if you know what I mean. “Verminous” is more a “South Of Heaven”, where it has a lot more variety and is more dynamic. It still has its fast parts, but it’s much more like us opening our doors, spreading our wings and using this dynamic energy. We wanted the album to feel less samey and have real variety in the songs and let the songs stand out as their own entity. We tried to make the compositions more epic, this time around, definitely less intensity at times, perhaps some buildup, to have some tension, release and to have the chance to really emote this time round. We have a lot of melancholic songs that are gripping on that level and trying to be a more emotive package as a whole and really trying to elicit a response from the listener.

DJ: (now having calmed down somewhat and actually doing what he’s supposed to): Songwriting techniques – how do you go about it? Do ideas spring from a single riff, or a lyrical idea, or a title idea? How does The Black Dahlia Murder work as a musical entity?

TS: The lyrics come second. I’ll have a list of some ideas that I kick around but for the most part I’m reacting to what I hear in a song. Either guitar player will demo the song in ProTools and by the time I hear it, it has both guitars, it has bass and it has programmed drums that sound pretty good. Then our drummer rewrites the drums hit for hit what will end up on the album and then I’ll start writing with it. I’ll sit with it, I’ll listen to it a gazillion times in my fucking underwear and really it’s a challenge to me and something I look forward to. Listening to the song a million times and then plotting how the plotline is going to go up and down with the music. I try to make the story fit every moment of the music and it is a challenge to write in those confines but it’s also very cool when it all comes together. I try to make the lyrical climax come with the musical climax so it makes this bigger picture. I really care about the lyrics and it’s not just something I scribble down but I try to bring somebody in. I try to make the listener go to a different place or imagine a different character. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s a hell of a challenge though. The rest of the guys pretty much write in solitude, either guitar player and it’s been this way for a long time now since we had members living out of state and we are pretty used to being spread out – there’s a lot of WhatsApp group texts that we talk to each other through, emails with ProTools files and we are used to this way of working now. Before we all used to write together in one room at band practice, but now we don’t have a traditional band practice anymore. We will get together before a tour all in the same spot and freshen up on things for a couple of days but now we rely on everyone looking after their own upkeep at home and keep their chops up on their own time and that’s a big responsibility but it’s just how this thing works now. The creative process is something I look forward to – every time I come back to it I’m excited to see where the band is musically and with every record there’s a big jump with creativity and I think the guys absorb a lot of information during three years of touring. We play a lot of music to each other, we play a lot of shows, see a lot of bands, so even though we are cranking out these records at a fairly alarming rate, there is a lot of growth between records and this is the most growth we have had between albums and a lot of it has come from “Nightbringers’ ” success. I’m looking forward to the future man. I see us pushing the boundaries further in the future.

DJ: I’m looking forward to seeing you tour in the UK as soon as this virus is done with. You’re going to be hungry. I expect you’ll be tearing my face off…

TS: There’s talk about maybe January for Europe and the UK. I think it might be our first tour back, but I’m not sure just yet.

DJ (who actually really does need to visit the lavatory at this point such is the relief of ending this extremely stressful experience): How different is Trevor Strnad, mad bastard throat with The Black Dahlia Murder, to Trevor Strnad sitting peacefully at home?

TS: I dunno man. I don’t really feel that I have two faces. I feel like I’m the same person here too (at home). A fun, easygoing metalhead. A lot of my life revolves around music, you know, collecting music and being a hound for the underground and checking out new bands and checking the scene… getting metal in the mail every day… I don’t look at what I do with The Black Dahlia Murder as a job, that’s an insult to it I think, it’s so fun. It is hard too, there’s a lot of sacrifice and a lot of hardships. Tours are largely very boring – there’s a lot of waiting around and shitty travel situations and you can liken it to camping at times. It’s not really glamorous and a lot of people don’t really think about or see the amount of work that it entails. I basically gave up my entire life to do this and I love it, I love staying in touch with the underground and it fuels my passion for The Black Dahlia Murder. I’m pretty much the same guy behind the scenes, you know, a big metal nerd!

DJ: Maybe a slightly quieter one than on stage…

TS: A little more reserved. There is a dark part and it’s a release for me to be on that stage and embodying the demonic characters that I have conjured up. Getting into that villain role – I feel that death metal is villain music and we’re the villains to societal norms and religion and it’s all about celebrating freedom, celebrating the underground and the friendship and the culture that’s there and there’s so much positivity there for “negative” music. I think people give us a bad rap, man.

DJ: Thank you, Sir Trevor of Strnad, for putting up with me barking drunken questions at you and basically flailing desperately to appear like I know what I’m doing… You fucking legend.

TS: Thanks a lot, man, it was fun. Take care.

And that’s fucking that. If you need me, I’ll be in a darkened room with an IV of absinthe and 24 nubile young virgins. Knock before you enter, otherwise it’s at your own risk.

Buy “Verminous”. It’s awesome. And so is Trevor Strnad.

“Verminous” by The Black Dahlia Murder was released by Metal Blade Records on 17.04.2020.

LINKS:
www.tbdmofficial.com/
www.facebook.com/theblackdahliamurderofficial/
www.twitter.com/bdmmetal
www.instagram.com/theblackdahliamurder_official/
www.youtube.com/user/blackdahliamurdertv

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of ‘Dark Juan’ and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with SECOND SHOOTER

EMQ’s with SECOND SHOOTER

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Los Angeles, California based Extreme Metal band, Second Shooter. Huge thanks to vocalist, Melanie Johnson, for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

My name is Melanie Johnson and I’m the vocalist of extreme metal band Second Shooter (groove metal/hardcore/thrash). The band has a kind of weird history. The two remaining original members, long-time friends Travis Hildreth (guitar) and Jim Wilinski (drums), were part of a band called Salvage 67 in 2015, when their vocalist went to prison for killing his wife. So that brought the band to a screeching halt.

Now that they’ve had some distance from the situation, we do make jokes about how that’s a pretty metal story (and we call my microphone at the studio the “Murder Mic”), but of course it was absolutely devastating to everyone involved. It took the band a while to move on; sometimes they didn’t even have the heart to pick up their instruments at practice. And I don’t mean to discount the pain of the victim’s loved ones, who are suffering to this day. Sorry to start the interview with something so heavy!

Anyway, the band in its current iteration came together in 2018 when Wynn McElwee (guitar), Jeff Clark (bass) and I joined.

How did you come up with your band name?

Unrelated to the murder thing, I promise! I wasn’t there when it was conceived of, but I know part of its appeal is the ambiguity. It could refer to JFK conspiracy theories, or to hypothetical shootings; it’s a common term in photography; and people always come up with other possible interpretations.

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We’re in Los Angeles, California, and honestly the scene is great here. The local scene is large, excitingly diverse, and very mutually supportive. And all the big acts come through because we’re a huge city. Sure, it isn’t as big as some of the major European cities for metal, but still – no complaints!

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

We just released this video for ‘1 in 6’ from our self-titled EP. It’s a super aggressive, super feminist song, and the video really captures that (thank you so much to TJ Grof, Rhys Green, and Sarah Doerner!):

Who have been your greatest influences?

For my vocals, I draw inspiration from all over the spectrum of heavy music, including some metal-adjacent genres like hardcore, post-hardcore, and even emo. For the band overall, some major influences are Pantera, Korn, Slipknot, classic death metal, early thrash metal… really all over the place. We like groovy, we like brutal, we like fast.

What first got you into music?

My mom is the coolest person I know and has introduced me to a large proportion of what I’ve listened to throughout my life. She also took me to lots of concerts as a teenager and she loved them as much as I did. She took me to my first show – Green Day – and some other great high school memories with her include seeing Opeth, Megadeth, Sabbath with Dio, Dream Theater, Machine Head… not to mention totally-not-metal bands like the White Stripes, the Shins, Death Cab for Cutie…

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

I haven’t really thought about that! In the abstract I’d like to feature a male vocalist for the contrast, but when I think about who I’d really love to work with and who would sound sick on our tracks, I think of like, Angela Gossow (ex-Arch Enemy), Tatiana Shmailyuk (Jinjer), Māra Lisenko (Māra)…

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

I don’t know a lot about the international festivals, which I’m sure are the best, so I’ll keep it local-ish: I think it would be pretty sick to play Las Rageous.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Ooh, none of those yet. Fan art would be weird but also fun.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Send me fan art ;). Just kidding. I’d say: make some art! Music, visual art, poetry… even if you don’t think you’d be good at it, if you have any inkling at all, you should definitely give it a shot. Having a creative outlet is great!

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Chester Bennington’s suicide tore me apart. His music got so many people through rough times, gave people hope, literally saved lives… and it’s so tragic not only that he’s not here anymore but also that he couldn’t save himself.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Ahh I enjoy everything about being a musician! Seeing people rocking the fuck out at shows, hearing from people that our music really resonated with them, the satisfaction of a song coming together… everything! Well, I guess not the pay-to-play culture of the big venues in LA.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

The pay-to-play thing is lame. For people who aren’t familiar: P2P is when a venue says, “Here are X tickets, sell them at $Y each and give us that much money.” So, in theory you could break even or make a profit, but in practice that never really happens — we aren’t going to charge our friends or fans face value if they’re getting their tickets from us.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

“The Shape of Punk to Come” by Refused. Just so sick beginning to end.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Was never into vinyl. I bought a lot of CD’s for most of my life, but streaming has absolutely taken over. You have access to everything!

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

All of our shows have been such a great time! It was super exciting and an honour to open for Jinjer in September of last year. Equally fun was a “Women Who Rock” show the next month, featuring local female-fronted bands ranging in heaviness from an acoustic set to… us. The crowd response was so great!

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

Well, music is my hobby and my real job is as a software engineer. Without music, I’d be what I was a few years ago: a software engineer in desperate need of a creative outlet!

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Definitely some (extremely) high-ranking American politicians and some powerful people who have gotten away with assault, then I’d burn the place down. Sorry not sorry.

What’s next for the band?

We’re writing a bunch of stuff and I’m absolutely psyched about it all. We plan to release a full-length this year. We haven’t played in a few months because we’ve been focusing on new material, but we are itching to get back on stage!! Got some shows in the works.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

www.facebook.com/SecondShooterBand
instagram.com/SecondShooterBand
www. secondshooter.bandcamp.com

And of course, we’re on all the streaming platforms.

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

I’m an American, I don’t understand Jaffa Cakes or the metric system!

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

This was fun! Thank you so much for Ever Metal for the opportunity and all the hard work you put into your site!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Interview with Olan Parkinson and Steve Maher of Abaddon Incarnate

Interview with Olan Parkinson and Steve Maher of Abaddon Incarnate
By Tammy Lomax

Hi Everyone, Rick Here,

In the underground extreme music scene Irish Deathgrind outfit Abaddon Incarnate could be considered a seminal band within the genre. They’ve been around for over 25 years now but there have been some interesting developments of late. Our very own Tammy recently got the chance to have a chat with Drummer Olan and Guitarist Steve about not only these, but also the bands history!

Tammy: Firstly, congratulations on the recent news with being signed to Transcending Obscurity Records for a multiple album deal. How are you feeling about this? And what will this entail for 2020 and the future?

Olan: Thank you, Tammy; yeah it is great news and great timing. We were planning to record in 2020 anyway but now to have an official platform through which we can release it is amazing. I have known of TO records for a long time and always admired Kunal’s drive and his dedication to real underground bands and really heavy stuff too, almost like the Indian Relapse Records. So, in June we are heading to Foel Studios to record with Chris Fielding which is awesome. I have worked with Chris several times now. He is just great, a thorough professional and just gets heavy dirty music. He has good history with Irish bands too having recorded with both Primordial and Mourning Beloveth. With regard to the future, who knows, Abaddon have always been an unknown quantity, but history has shown that we ‘do not go gentle into the good night’ so I would expect something ferocious for full length no 6.

Tammy: Kunal Chokski (owner of TO records) mentions that he has been a huge fan of Abaddon Incarnate since the release of “Nadir” in 2001. What is your favourite track on this album and why? And can you guide us through the process of how you wrote the album?

Olan: Ha heavy question; I of course have several! I’m going to pick two if I may? Opener ‘I Will Nail You In’ has got to be up there. It’s just relentless from start to finish and the lyrics match, just full on without being overly graphic, but full of genuine vitriol. Ironically the title came about from a joke which I will tell you in person one day. It’s still a staple in the live set, our ‘Angel Of Death’ if you will. I also love ‘Unclean’ I think as a contrast it is a bit more mid paced but with a real groovy middle 8 but it literally is unclean, it feels it, it’s a filthy song, again the subject matter is quite dark! I wrote the lyrics for this one, and I love exploring the blackness within humans and the depravity that we are capable of.

The writing of “Nadir”, once it got underway happened quite quickly. We actually had about 10 tracks written for an album and thought we were almost there with the process. It felt strained and not very natural though, we hadn’t quite crossed the line into Grindcore at this stage but we were all getting into more extreme stuff, I was really loving Brutal Truth’s, Extreme Conditions and Need To Control, and we were all getting into Nasum circa Inhale Exhale and Human 2.0. So, one rehearsal Bill came in with the main riff for ‘I Will Nail You In’ and that was it, game changer. We scrapped the whole album and started re-writing and it was Deathgrind from then on. And due to the Nasum influence we asked Mieszko (RIP) would he be interested in working with us and the rest is history. “Nadir” was recorded over 2 weeks or so in his studio in Sweden.

Tammy: Abaddon Incarnate have been going for 25 years. As you might expect, during this time, some members have come, gone and returned. What inspires you to keep motivated regardless of setbacks?

Steve: I’m pretty stubborn, so setbacks motivate me. It’s sad to lose old members but people move on, the exciting part is when you get a new line-up; you get new ideas and energy!

Tammy: Abaddon Incarnate were the first extreme Irish band to play in Ecuador, Colombia and Peru. What advice and tips can you give to up and coming bands regarding networking and getting their name out there?

Steve: We were approached by South American promoters “Guts n Blood”. He did a magazine feature and the tour arose from that. Similar to our first Australian tour! If you want to get your name out there you need good distribution and good PR. Labels will do PR work but sometimes it’s worth investing in a bit more PR. We have a few individuals who do good work for us.

Tammy: You guys have had some huge achievements, like supporting massive bands Obituary, Napalm Death, Bolt Thrower etc…What has been the most memorable and rewarding so far?

Steve: Playing with all these bands is great. But the most memorable gigs are the DIY tours we headline ourselves like the Australian, South American or Russian tours we did.

Tammy: What is the most Bizarre thing that has happened on stage on a tour?

Olan: I can only speak for myself here of course but there have been a few. One gig, years ago, a guy jumped up on stage, smashed a beer glass and started cutting himself while we were playing. I also remember a gig in the Czech Republic at this small bar in the middle of nowhere. When we arrived there was no one about. No cars, chickens running around…all very weird. But come gig time people came from all over and filled the place. We had this support band and they had this dude playing guitar who had lost his arms and legs when he got run over by a train. He had this little rig fashioned where he had his plectrum attached to his stump, and he played with that…amazing! That place had some of the weirdest coloured drinks I’ve ever seen. But probably the most memorable bizarre thing for me was on that same tour. Not on stage however, but we were out with Desecration and this was towards the end of this tour. We had decided to stay in a hotel after this gig; it might even have been the last show. But we finished late, like midnight or 1am and we went back to this Hotel. It was all locked up but there was a cellar bar open there so down we went. The barman was sitting on this couch with this topless girl and watching porn, drinking a bottle of champagne. He was a very friendly chap though and brought us over a bottle of Absinthe, genuine Absinthe. I don’t think any of us had had the real shit before, but we got stuck into it. After whatever amount of time, the door burst open and these two rather large policemen barged in, guns and all, and next thing we were all up against the wall getting searched as they were roaring at the barman. But I’ll never forget just looking at the guys and everyone was pissing themselves laughing, it was so surreal, none of us had I.D. on us…nothing, it could have been a really serious situation but at the time it was the funniest thing ever. Thankfully they just kicked us out and we went to our room. I haven’t had any Absinthe since that night!!

Tammy: With some help and guidance from Zero Tolerance Magazine, in 2013, you made your stamp in Australia and have set up tours like ‘The Drunks and Convicts Tour 2017’ and a vast amount of others. Can you explain the pros and cons regarding the Australian underground scene and if there are any similarities to any of the other countries you’ve played?

Steve: I love Australia. The bands over there are quality and the scene is pretty awesome especially in places like Melbourne! We play a lot of small shows over there too but in Melbourne we always manage to do at least two gigs and get a sizeable crowd. The last tour we did there for example we did 3 Melbourne gigs in 2 weeks. Melbourne is an arty creative place. Australia is really unlike anywhere else. There is a unique vibe to the place.

Tammy: London Deathfest, Dublin Deathfest and headlining Carnage Festival in Switzerland are amongst some of the festivals you have previously played. What festivals would you like to play in the future?

Olan: I guess any of the big ones have to be on the list. Hellfest or Wacken would be awesome. Personally, I would love to get to Maryland Deathfest. But also, festivals like Fuck The Commerce and Obscene Extreme are just brilliant for showcasing the filthiest bands on the planet. But it’s important to support smaller festivals as they will be the festivals of the future. Metaldays in Slovenia for example! That is definitely one of the better new festivals. Great country too!

Tammy: Abaddon Incarnate was reformed from thrash legends Bereaved. What were the reasons for you changing the name and who made the decision?

Olan: I think it was mainly due to the change of direction, musically. We felt that the name Bereaved, while a cool name, didn’t suit the heavier, more aggressive direction the band was headed in. So, I think the decision was a collective one. We had several variations but eventually settled on Abaddon Incarnate. It suited our themes and mind-set at the time. Lyrically things have moved on, but the basic ideologies and motivations are the same. I still quite like the original logo which I designed (I use that word loosely) I can still remember the 30 or so attempts over a couple of days to get it to what it is now, Brutal Truth’s logo was the inspiration. I can still remember bringing it to rehearsals for approval, and Steve saying, “it looks like a coffee stain”, but they must have liked it because we still use it today.

Tammy: If you could all select one Icon to invite over for a good few beers and fine dining who would it be and why?

Olan: Well unfortunately, I can only speak for myself here. I would love to sit drink and talk with Reinhold Messner. Many people will know that he was the first mountaineer to summit all fourteen 8000 metre peaks and the first to summit Everest without supplemental oxygen as well as the first solo summit of Everest, the list goes on. It is an incredible feat today but absolutely unthinkable back in the days that he did it. He has written over 80 books and runs a mountaineering museum in the South Tyrol. I just think he would be fascinating to talk to. However, I could be wrong. Maybe he is sick of talking about mountains and would just want to get pissed. But that in itself would be a cool story!

Rick here again;

I’d like to thank Tammy, Olan and Steve for the interview and I, for one, cannot wait to hear the new album when it is ready. If you want to find out more about Abaddon Incarnate then click on the links below

LINKS:

Band:

https://www.facebook.com/abaddonincarnate/
https://www.instagram.com/abaddon.incarnate.official/
https://abaddonincarnate.bandcamp.com/
https://open.spotify.com/artist/7JiGOjZmUWZWyhhQsyBZs4
https://www.youtube.com/user/stevemaher666

Label:

https://tometal.com/
https://www.facebook.com/transcendingobscurityrecords/
https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Tammy Lomax and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with CADAVER SOIREE

Cadaver Soiree Logo

EMQ’s with CADAVER SOIREE

Hi Everyone. Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Leeds based Extreme Metal band Cadaver Soiree! Huge thanks to them for taking part!

What is your name, what do you play and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

We are:
Marc Hood – vocals and smells
Andy Firth – Guitars and programming
Neil Hannaford – Bass and beards

We play a lovely blend of old school death metal with hints of black metal and doom, there’s also a few industrial influences thrown in for fun. We formed in 2016, with the final line-up as it currently is forming in 2018. We released our first EP through MSH music group and the latest album is self-released.

How did you come up with your band name?

It was suggested by a friend of the band and stuck.

What country are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

UK – the scene is great and getting stronger every day. We’ve found support up and down the country wherever we’ve played.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single or Video)

“To Betray The Creator” is a mix of old and new songs and marks the starting point for the band in this incarnation.

Who have been your greatest influences?

We’ve got too many influences to mention fully but Cannibal Corpse, Carcass, Napalm Death, White Zombie, Sepultura and Autopsy

What first got you into music?

Neil: “Louis Armstrong”.

Andy: “I genuinely can’t remember, as long as I can remember I’ve been into and playing music”.

Marc “vocally being asked to join Cadaver Soiree was my first foray into shouting/fronting a band but I’ve played bass in a few bands before. Early Metallica videos played a big part”.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Zeal and Ardour would be ridiculously good.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Bloodstock or Wacken would be amazing, though in honesty we’d be happy to play virtually any festival with a good line-up.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Neil had his palm read by a fan once. In a previous life he was apparently an executioner and a World War One nurse. Presumably not in the same life!

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Hello!

If you could bring one Metal/Rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Dead!

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Marc: Pure catharsis, I hate apathy.

Neil: The buzz of playing live.

Andy: Creating.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Fairer pay for artist streams.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Marc: “Beneath The Remains” – Sepultura

Neil: “Chaos AD” – Sepultura

Andy: It changes too frequently to say one.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

CD’s so long as they’re good quality.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Virtually any gig we’ve played at Rebellion Manchester, always a great crowd and sound.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

We do lots of things. Mostly really boring things!

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

The other two band members and their partners.

What’s next for the band?

Writing’s already started for the next release, and we’re booking shows for as regular as possible. BOOK US.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

https://open.spotify.com/artist/0eQPD6r6nkniygbtsDfHpv
https://www.facebook.com/CadaverSoiree/

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

They’re a cake. Clue’s in the name.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thanks for your time too, you lovely people. Hope folks enjoy the music. Can’t wait to shout at you all!

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Damim – A Fine Game Of Nil

A Fine Game Of Nil Cover

Damim – A Fine Game Of Nil
Apocalyptic Witchcraft Recordings
Release Date: 28/06/2019
Running Time: 42:40
Review by ‘Dark Juan’
10/10

It is Saturday night in rural France. The local gossips have returned to their homes after disseminating all possible information to the entire village, and probably have been strapped back into their scold’s bridles by the husbands who are STILL covering up twenty year old affairs of the heart with the lady on the Rue de Ty Lidec. I, Dark Juan, The Gothfather, Love Commando and Sex Fuhrer to toffs and gentry, am sitting, beer in hand and having my face torn clean off by this piece of SAVAGERY masquerading as music entitled “A Fine Game Of Nil” by British neo-blackened metallers Damim – Damim being Arabic/Aramaic for bloodshed, I believe. That’s about the only useful fact you’ll get out of this stream of consciousness bollocks you’re about to read, so treasure it, ok?

First of all, I have to say the production work on this record is extremely satisfying, almost to the point of orgasm. Everything is so crystal fucking clear the band might as well be sat in my head battering the inside of my cranium with high powered amplification and pneumatic drills. However this is ultra-precise savagery, because Damim as musicians are tighter than a duck’s arse, and probably considerably more waterproof because they write huge, coruscating songs of complexity, power and depth and play them at a speed that Formula One drivers would struggle to comprehend. There are many key changes and time changes but nothing of the music, even when it’s flitting from one tempo to another, is extraneous. The musical progressions are logical and impressive and it all fits together like a particularly complex heavy fucking metal jigsaw puzzle. Special mention must also go to Nathanael Underwood for his vocals – a primeval, visceral roar that appears to have come from the bowels of some previously undiscovered hell found underneath the foundations of Satan’s bit of it, yet retaining clarity and having words that are actually discernible as they are being sung! This is a momentous feat in death and blackened metal so bonus points to you, old chap!

Normally it just sounds like bears vomiting. Not that all this talk of intelligence, complicated musicianship and socially conscious lyrics should distract you from the fact that this is the dog’s testicles from a sheer metal point of view. There’s blastbeats and brutality in spades. It’s not a battlewagon of a record, it’s a sleek and shiny supersonic jet fighter of one. It’s blindingly fast and sharp and operates precision guided weaponry, and YOU are the target. Damim are out to kill you all with laser-guided accuracy.

So, compositionally exquisite, vocally exemplary and velocity unmatched! There has to be a downside, right? Well, fucking good luck finding one, mate. Damim are a phenomenally intelligent band. The lyrics are pertinent and relevant to events in the world today and even the album title alludes to zero sum game theory. Look it up, it’s actually genuinely fascinating. I love this record so much I have ruined yet more underwear and had to pause in my libertine pursuits of alcohol, laudanum and abusing young ladies to reflect on the sheer majesty and magnificence of what I have just heard. In fact, I have finished the record and literally just pressed play again to start over. It appears I want my face to look like burger meat, considering Damim are flaying it off bit by bit. Favourite tracks on here are ‘Beyond The Call Of Emptiness’, and the hilariously named ‘Something For The Weekend’. It’s hilarious because the song title seems so out of keeping with the rest of the record, OK? I also really like ‘NecroKino’, a tune that the intro reminds me greatly of the synthwave stylings of groups like Gunship offer before pulling out hidden weapons and proceeding to skin you alive with diamond sharp guitars and drums that can cause tectonic misery. The other titles skirt perilously close to one of my favourite sources of comedy – heavy metal word salad song titles. As we shall shortly see!

In short then – if you love extreme metal you’ll fucking love this. If, on the other hand, you think metal begins and ends with Avenged Sevenfold you’ll hate it so much you’ll savagely murder your own parents. “A Fine Game Of Nil” is PROOF that metal is one of the most phenomenally complex styles of music to play and also one of the most difficult to master. Damim have fucking mastered it, made it their collective bitch and are currently beating it into further compliance with flails and chains and all manner of unspeakable other things. The thing is, I am of the opinion that this record is that good that it might win a few converts from the less extreme fans, because although it is brutal deluxe, faster than a trip to the lavatory after a dodgy curry and heavier than a neutronium sex toy, it somehow STILL remains accessible and approachable. Damim have done something remarkable. They have made music bordering on black metal interesting again (which is not easily done as there hasn’t been a proper good black metal record since “Anthems To The Welkin At Dusk”) and also made it something even a new convert could enjoy instead of just the hardened heavy metal warrior. There’s much to enjoy as parts of the music touch on other styles like djent, the odd riff progression has a whiff of nu-metal about it and there is a thrash element running throughout the whole thing. I also think having an excellent production job will also win fans considering most extreme metal sounds like it has been recording using candy floss and asbestos as filters and recorded through the wall next door.

Anyway. A splendid effort from these gentlemen! I’m serious when I say that I consider this to be the album of the year so far. I fucking love it.

The Patented Dark Juan Blood Splat Rating System offers Damim a blood soaked and thoroughly gore coated 10/10. Extraordinarily good! I have run out of words.

TRACKLISTING:
01. In A Language They Understand
02. Descendant Of Amalek (If you don’t know, Amalek is described in the Hebrew Bible as a country that is an enemy of the Israelites It can also be referring to the nation’s founder, the grandson of Esau. You’re welcome. Just because I despise religion as social control doesn’t mean I haven’t studied the scriptures.)
03. Beyond The Call Of Emptiness (Surely emptiness can’t call? Because it’s like… empty?)
04. Something For The Weekend
05. NecroKino
06. Body Is Broken
07. Rising Of The Lights
08. Existential Epiphany Within A Waking Dream (The only existential things I get during waking dreams are crises…)
09. All I Want To Know Is (what the rest of this title is because my computer is refusing to tell me. Sorry, chaps.) – (RICK HERE, the full title is ‘All I Want To Know Is How It Ends’)

LINE-UP:
Nathanael Underwood – Vocals and guitars
Flow Toulman – Drums
Faust Perez – Bass
Edd Amos – Guitars

LINKS:
https://www.damim.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/dam.nation.uk/

https://www.instagram.com/damim_uk/

https://www.youtube.com/user/vacuusanimum

 

Damim Photo - Credit Tina Korhonen

 

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Dark Juan and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

Photo courtesy of Tina Korhonen.

 

Krysthla – Worldwide Negative

Worldwide Negative Cover

Krysthla – Worldwide Negative
PHD
Release Date: 16/08/2019
Running Time: 42:28
Review by Tammy Lomax
10/10

When I was given the opportunity to review Krysthla’s new album “Worldwide Negative” I was ecstatic. It was quite cosmic as at the time I was commuting and listening to ‘Luminosity’ from their debut album!

In my opinion Krysthla are by far one of the best extreme metal bands out there and their hard work has already proven to be a massive success for them.

There are many reasons why I appreciate Krysthla, mainly being how consistent they are with their delivery in everything they do, from live performances to mastering their albums and are genuinely lovely fellas; they literally are masters in perfection. When I was first introduced to Krysthla they were supporting Textures and they utterly smashed the hell out of the stage. They hammer with precision and they are persistent in whatever they convey.

“A War Of Souls And Desires” was released in 2015 and this was only the beginning of something beautiful. Two years later “Peace In Our Time” was released and, putting it lightly, blew your ears off and it hit a No.2 slot in Amazon’s Rock and Metal chart. Krysthla did not stop there, playing the Sophie Stage at Bloodstock Festival and then going on to tour with the mighty Decapitated. Just when you assume they cannot get any better they do and don’t do it lightly! Like a massive wallop in the face, if you aren’t awake yet then you will be after listening to “Worldwide Negative” It is going to be huge!

Recently released single ‘Zero Sum Game’ has had tremendous amounts of airplay on Kerrang, Primordial, and Bloodstock radio etc. along with their music video, DO go and check it out! It’s a massive tease into what to expect with the rest of the album. I am actually still recovering from the shock of it all because “Worldwide Negative” has reached out beyond all expectations.

When I plugged my headphones in, straight away bang!!

Krysthla have become more dynamic with their synth sounds, making the music flow. It is the foundation to their new sound and personally I cannot imagine them without these now.

The emotion you experience after listening to album opener ‘Negative’ is baffling, you’re almost unsure of how to feel and then ‘Reawaken’ slaps you hard in the face. You reach a pinnacle then are thrown back down vigorously and you end up like a pile of mashed potato! Then, out of nowhere, comes the wonderful chorus, how have they pulled this off? Your head is all over the place trying to comprehend what the hell is going on but it is absolute magic, art and science all at the same time.

‘Grief Is New Love’ is much faster with what seems like some heavy slam riffs. I have no space left in my brain to actually understand how they have managed to pull off fast thrash and slam together, it is heavy, mean and it is angry, its pure evil actually. You feel the passion in this track completely, it’s insanely good and you don’t want it to end. It is diverse with switching dynamics but also flows beautifully. I can accept that I have never heard anything so powerful before!

‘Zero Sum Game’ is definitely the big tease as mentioned earlier. Never assume with Krysthla because they will blow that out the water and then go ahead and set it on fire. In all seriousness picking a favourite track on this album is impossible. ‘White Castles’ is a little break from the hammering, but it’s done in such a way where you don’t want to relax. You can relate to the expression of pain is all I can say. It is beautifully done and you can really hear their message in this track… this is your moment to take a breather. For sure it pulls at your heart, thus much easier on the ears. Have you ever wanted to scream at the world? Then this track will get you. It is slower but massively needed.

‘Psalm Of Heartlessness’ is exactly what Krysthla are about, bringing you back into the album after absolute mayhem. One of my favourite things about their sound has to be the vocals, Adrian Mayes has an exceptionally powerful voice yet sounds exactly the same when performing live, how he maintains that growl, at that level, I do not know!

‘Aurea Mediocritas’ oh yes, here come those meaty bass riffs, Krysthla totally own it. Jesus, you can get into a serious rhythm with this track. This is definitely an alluring track and will open up a mosh pit for sure. If you are not pumped yet, you will be. There is a taste of everything here, their original sound with added extras but not too overwhelming. It is a little gentler on the ears due to the slower speed but no less powerful. Finally, how do you possibly end such a powerful album? with ‘The Gift’! It’s the bounciest track on “Worldwide Negative” and why not eh, leaving the listener on a slight high before the ‘what the heck just happened’ kicks in! Every single second has been thought about, every second. I had my arms up in the air at the end with nothing but complete respect. You really need this track to balance out the rest of the album and it works perfectly.

When you step out of your comfort zone and sprinkle some modern extras, you don’t always get the results you expect but Krysthla pulled me in immediately, got my attention and further excited the more I listened. It has left me on an absolute high and feeling I can literally take on the world. Every single track on this album is gold dust! It becomes overwhelming when the album finishes. Every single beat, riff, vocal, in fact everything has had a vast amount of time, effort and passion put into it and it’s massively better than their previous albums. I have sat here for ages to try and find a flaw but I just can’t. It’s musical evolution at its finest. From the moment you press play you are hitting another level of extreme metal.

“Worldwide Negative” will be released on 16th August so get yourself a copy and take note. If you can get your ass to Bloodstock Festival and watch them smash the Main Stage then do it! I have so much love and respect for them; they could not have done a better job at destroying my ears. A massive well done Krysthla, I am a happy Tammy.

TRACKLISTING:
01. Negative
02. Reawaken
03. Grief Is New Love
04. Zero Sum Game
05. White Castles
06. Psalm Of Heartlessness
07. Aurea Mediocritas
08. The Gift

LINKS:
http://www.krysthla.co.uk/
https://shor.by/krysthla
https://www.facebook.com/krysthla/

https://www.instagram.com/krysthla_band/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwjHzxNfTUqNaZ9wshfKQMQ

Promo Pic

 

Disclaimer: This review is solely the property of Tammy Lomax and Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with Crejuvent

Logo

EMQ’s with Crejuvent

Hi Everyone. Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Liverpool, UK based Extreme Metal solo act Crejuvent. Huge thanks to Freddy for taking part!

What is your name, what do you play and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

My name is Freddy and I play metal music. I’m a musician based in Liverpool UK, I’ve been playing and producing bands for many years and Crejuvent is my main solo project so to speak. I had the idea for it a while back, releasing a set of demos in 2015 and my debut EP in 2017. I’m now gearing up for the release of a new single titled Vesti La Giubba coming out on May 18th.

How did you come up with your band name?

It came to me in a dream. In it I was fighting off giant flies with a huge sword in an apocalyptic like scenario, and once I had beaten them all a local village offered me the services of all their women as a thank you. As I was gearing up for the inevitable month long orgy that would ensue by renovating my golden palace, I found in the foundations a stone tablet that read Crejuvent.
Oh wait that wasn’t a dream, that was my 19th birthday. Ah well.

What country are you from and what is the metal scene like there?

I’m half Italian and half Brazilian, although I grew up in the US, in Italy, in the Netherlands, and have been based in the UK for the past 7 years. So I don’t know how to answer your question really. The fact that I’m not rolling in cash on a daily basis leads me to believe that the metal scene in all of these countries is terrible, but that can’t be accurate.

What is your latest release (Album, EP, Single, Video)

I will be releasing a new single on May 18th titled Vesti La Giubba along with a video. It’s a cover of the famous aria from Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci opera. It’s a piece about love, betrayal, and insanity. It’s also the first time I sing in Italian so I’m quite excited to release it. With the single, I’ll be releasing a B-side called Blue Spirit. It’s a 8 and a half minute epic and it’s one of my more intricate songs and I feel it really showcases my songwriting as its strongest.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Devin Townsend has been my biggest influence by far, and I think it shows. But I talk about him loads already so I’ll mention a few others. Fleshgod Apocalypse have been a huge influence too, as is probably obvious from the fact that I’m doing a metal cover of an opera piece. I’m big into my technical death metal so bands like Obscura, Cynic, Beyond Creation, amongst others, have been a crucial factor in my musical development. I’ve been really getting into Leprous lately as well and have been incorporating some of those elements into my songwriting lately.

What first got you into music?

Teenage angst coupled with social rejection. Or were those a result of me getting into metal? Either ways, I needed an outlet when I was a young person and music was the safest one. Why go around smashing shit when you can listen to music that’s ABOUT smashing shit?

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

I hate working with other musicians – they only hold me back…!

Nah I kid. I collaborate lots with other people, and if there’s one thing I’ve learned is that everyone has a different way of working on music and collaborating. Whilst I could SAY that I want to work with some of my biggest influences, truth is our way of working on music might not yield fruitful. So I don’t know who I’d like to work with – I’d have to know more about how they go about their business.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

I played Metal Days a in 2017 and that was so much fun – it’s already my favourite festival ever and the fact that I got to play it was amazing and would love to do it again. Otherwise, one of those cruise ship type festivals look like they’d be fun!

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

In one of my other bands (which I think you guys are also featuring funnily enough) we got given a book by a fan that they wrote. It was…quite the read if I say so myself.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

I’m glad y’all like the music. It pleases me to hear so thanks.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Hmm I don’t know, maybe Peter Steele as I’d really like to see Type O Negative live. But only if he comes back EXACTLY the way he is right now, half decayed and everything.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

I love performing and writing stuff, it’s the biggest high for me. I also get to see a lot of the country while touring and I get to meet so many awesome people. Unfortunately, that means I get to meet a lot of un-awesome people too. It can also take quite a toll on you as a person, both physically and emotionally.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

This isn’t exclusive to the music industry, unfortunately it’s how a lot of things work in this world, but I hate all the blatant ass kissing that needs to be done to get anywhere and the “networking” for the sake of networking. I suck at socializing and talking to people and I’d like to just let the music do the talking. But unfortunately the band that can barely string more than 3 chords together to write mediocre music will get further than I can because their singer knows how to be “friends” with the right people.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Alien by Strapping Young Lad.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

I like CD’s, I find vinyls to be a bit of a novelty but people like them so that’s cool. And why download these days when you can just stream?

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Playing at Metal Days and Winter Days of Metal last year was pretty cool, it’s definitely high up there on the list. Everything about it was great, the atmosphere, the bands, the weather, even our drummer dislocating his shoulder.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I’d be the village idiot.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

I would invite John Mulaney five times.

What’s next for the band?

As I mentioned before, I got a single coming out on May 18th, and it’s gonna kick ass! After that I’m in talks with some people to potentially get a full band together for this project but that’s still all just in the works. In the meantime I’ll keep on writing more material and see where it all goes!

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

Crejuvent is on Facebook primarily, but I have my own personal Instagram and Youtube channel that I use for Crejuvent as well. I’m also on Bandcamp where you can check out all of my releases, at least the ones that aren’t on Spotify and stuff.
https://www.facebook.com/Crejuvent/
https://crejuvent.bandcamp.com/

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

As a non British person, I don’t understand why they are even called cakes. Were they giant at one point? That shit is clearly a biscuit of some variety.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Thank you! Be sure to follow Crejuvent on Facebook, Instagram, and Youtube and keep an eye out for Vesti La Giubba coming out on May 18th!! Byeeeeee!

 

Crejuvent PR2

 

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this review, unless you have the strict permission of both parties. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.