EMQ’s with DETHONATOR

EMQ’s with DETHONATOR

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with London, England based Heavy Metal band, Dethonator. Huge thanks to ‘randomly selected Dethonator bandmember of the week’ for taking part and making this, without doubt, the best EMQ’s we have done to date. Absolute gold!!!

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Greetings. I am randomly selected Dethonator bandmember of the week. I play the things. We go back eighteen years and have been Dethonator since in 2009. We’ve been stomping about the UK underground being phenomenally untrendy since we were kids and nobody has died, popped a sprog or turned 40 yet. So, I guess that’s something.

How did you come up with your band name?

In an era where metal was suffering from a huge self-awareness crisis and every band name had to have a minimum of five words and sound like an indie band, we decided to go for the most Ronseal name we could think of. If you’re analysing it then you’ve missed the point. We are Dethonator. We are a heavy metal band. Bosh!

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

London, at the moment. Right now, it’s exactly the same as everywhere else.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

“Race Against The Sun: Part Two”. It’s a 40-minute concept album about Dracula. It’ll be out in full on November 27th, this year. I suppose it’s a bit like Dream Theater’s “Metropolis Part 2: Scenes From A Memory”, if Dream Theater had all forgotten how to play their instruments and decided to base their album on a classic horror novel, rather than on whatever the hell Nicholas and Victoria were supposed to be doing.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Ronald McDonald, Colonel Sanders and Aunt Bessie.

What first got you into music?

School. Seriously, I had a recorder in my hand before I cared about music at all. Then other instruments. Played music a lot without actually being obsessed with it. Accidentally stumbled on Iron Maiden at sixteen. Everything went wrong from there.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

I’d fancy a collaboration with Iced Earth. I’d suggest we record an epic historical concept album. Then, in the studio, we’d play all the open chords and they’d play all the palm-muted ones. I’d call it “Demons and Pissheads”.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

The Great British Beer festival. Scream for me, Kensington.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

We got a load of dolls made up of the band as zombies once from a fan’s mum. They used to sit on our amps at gigs. We gradually lost them all but there’s one nailed above the bar in The Devonshire Arms, Camden.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

We’re sorry that we don’t post more online. Unfortunately, most of the band are so allergic to social media that we barely know what the internet is anymore. Still, you should subscribe to us on YouTube all the same. Tris still does videos on there, and some of them are alright. There will be a lot of new posts in the coming weeks.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Freddie Mercury. Then there would be a reason to go to Glastonbury at some point.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Playing live is the most enjoyable part, even if it is just to the bar staff and some confused tourists who wandered in by accident. Everything else is a bit rubbish.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

I’d force it to stop pretending that it was still an industry.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Postcards From Heaven – The Lighthouse Family.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

CD’s. Vinyl has become far too expensive, there’s no reason to download anything and tapes are generally awful. People who buy tapes have bought into the idea of tapes; the rose tinted mythology of a bygone era where things were so inaccessible that desperate music fans actually copied and traded them. Unfortunately, without the community of diehards and pen pals, all you have got left is something small that sounds worse than a vinyl and is less convenient than a cd. I should know, my car is full of them. Have you ever heard the first Bathory album on tape in the car? Nor have I, but I have tried to.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Every gig we’ve ever done right now will pale in comparison to the next one we get to play, if we get to play it. Aside from that, supporting U.F.O at The Concorde 2 in Brighton was pretty cool.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

I’d go and be a Viking re-enactor in my spare time. It’s almost as good a way as metal to hang out with my own kind; in my case, a hairy man-child, desperate for a heady dose of escapism from the modern world. At least the shield chomping and axe lumping chaps can less awkwardly explain away all of their Nordic tattoos. Not that I’ve got any; too posh.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Nobody. I’m socially distancing.

What’s next for the band?

Most probably being the first people to click on the heart emoji when you publish this article.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

We do have our own rather spiffing website but we’re not sure that people actually go on websites anymore. Alas, we’re mired in that miserable, toxic, algorithm-plagued money pit that people call Facebook. If someone had told the metal bands of the 70’s that, instead of having a record label bankroll and promote their recordings for market consumption to generate financial revenue, they would actually be self-funding and self-promoting their recordings for social consumption to generate digital interactions, then not a single one of them would have ever left Birmingham.

www.dethonator.com/
www.facebook.com/dethonator/
www.twitter.com/dethonator_band
www.instagram.com/dethonator/
www.open.spotify.com/artist/1qiejOEj9neHOv4cfHLjuI
www.youtube.com/user/Dethonatortv

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

When the history of the British Isles has been written, very few Historians have given the Jaffa Cake its due recognition in the development of our nations. This omission has much to do with the reshaping of the historical prism by the politics of the modern west; the British public are simply unaware of their own history. The Jaffa Cake does not feature on the school curriculum, nor is it the subject of any noted field of study. This is due, in part, to the confusion you refer to in your question. The ambiguity of the Jaffa Cake’s nature has diminished its prominence in the fields of Biscuitology and Cake Studies. However, one can still trace the journey of this challenging, yet significant comestible through time if one extends the breadth of one’s study beyond the boundaries of Panorama and The History Channel.

The Jaffa Cake first appears in British History during The Glorious Revolution of 1688. With the Catholic monarch James II supplanted by the joint protestant rule of Mary II and her Dutch husband, William of Orange, a new delicacy was commissioned by the revolution parliament in honour of their new sovereign. Intended for the high tea trays of seventeenth century aristocratic society, the intention was to represent the seemingly bloodless and positive transition of power to King Billy by making the Jaffa Cake both soft and, of course, orange flavoured. Unfortunately, with the subsequent Battle of The Boyne and The Massacre of Glencoe tarnishing the intended peaceful public image of William III, the Jaffa Cake fell out of favour in London society and thus entered the free market, the rights of production and ownership to be sold to the highest bidder. So, the recipe came into the hands of McVitie and Price, a reputable Edinburgh-based biscuit makers.

This seemingly innocuous event was to have unforeseen and catastrophic consequences in the north of the country. Catholic Highlanders, enraged at the production of such an overtly Protestant snack in their country’s capital, were quick to join forces with the Jacob Fruitfield Food Group. Jacobs, who had narrowly missed out on the acquisition of Jaffa Cakes to McVitie’s, launched a full-scale insurrection against The Crown. So, commenced the Jacobite Rebellions of the eighteenth century. In the aftermath of the violence and the failure of the rebels, the prohibition of the Jaffa Cake was curiously included in the post rebellion laws that governed the punitive restriction of Highland dress.

Seemingly, this ill-fated snack food had become viewed as too contentious; the Cumberland Sausage was instead proposed to both glorify the Duke of Cumberland’s victory at The Battle of Culloden and to obscure the misfire of the Jaffa Cake’s previous inception. However, the Jaffa Cake proved to be a tenacious foe and survived via the much-lauded escape of the deposed Stuart heir, “Bonnie” Prince Charlie, to mainland Europe. As was written in the original lyrics to The Skye Boat Song (before the subsequent Robert Louis Stevenson penned version):

“Speed, bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing Onward!
The sailors cry Carry the lad,
with yon biscuit tin Over the sea to Skye”

The Jaffa Cake slips out of history at this point, save for a few scant references in sectarian songs, now banned at modern football matches. In addition, they are mentioned in an unfinished draft of an Ian Fleming novel that was too misogynistic to publish, even in the 1950s.

However, one curious reference does exist in the bafflingly obscure first draft of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik”, recently discovered by a musicologist from the University of Margate. One theorises that the beloved public image of Mozart being a prodigy who was able to compose music without making alterations or corrections has caused this recent discovery to be downplayed. Still, it would appear that Mozart was frustrated by the Jaffa Cake, and intended the original title to be “Eine Kleine Arsch Platzchen”. Moreover, the original composition contained lyrics, which followed the principle melody and, when translated into English, read as follows:

“This is not a biscuit or a cake; What the hell’s it doing on my plate?”

It is apparent that even minds as great as that of W.A. Mozart have been troubled by this unanswerable question. How fitting, then, that over three centuries since its creation, this delightfully contentious and controversial biscake should survive wars, religious division and transitions of monarchy to be analysed by 21st century metal bands, united by their common search for a lost sense of purpose and significance.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Have any of the other obscure British metal bands you’ve featured been coerced into researching the history of the Jaffa Cake in order to plug their new record or is it just us?

(It’s just you, although I might add that this is the best answer we have received for any question, let alone the Jaffa Cake question…and that’s not just British bands but worldwide! In future “what the hell is a Jaffa Cake?”, or indeed, leaving the question blank, just isn’t going to be an acceptable reply anymore – Rick 😉)

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with HEDRA

EMQ’s with HEDRA

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Norwich, UK based Heavy Metal band Hedra. Huge thanks to all of them for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Sean: I’m Sean, the handsome fellow of the bunch / drummer, and also the new guy! I know the guys have had a tough time in the past with drummers, so I am excited to bring a bit of stability and hopefully be the final piece of a pretty awesome heavy-metal jigsaw!

Jim: I love you Sean but you don’t know what that means as yet, lol, I’m Jim I play vocals, the band started off in Poland by Kamil, they had another vocalist but he didn’t understand English, Kamil moved to England to find a British singer and take them back to Poland where they would be playing huge festivals but he liked it here so stayed, and he auditioned me, I liked it, he liked it and so we stayed together from there on. We love each other indefinitely, you have to have that in a band, Sean doesn’t know that yet.

Simon: I’m Simon, I play guitar. I moved to Norwich in 2007, since that time I played in few projects. I’m quite new in the band. I joined Hedra in late 2019. I can see a big potential in the band and current members.

Kamil: My name is Kamil. I’m the guitarist and one of the formers of Hedra band. I moved to Norwich around 6 years ago. First time in my life I saw a chance to create a serious band. I was looking for members and I met Jim and that was the beginning of Hedra.

Steve: My name….is Michael Caine…just joking, Steve Saunders, Bassist ,Backing vocals for Hedra. I joined the band about eight months or so ago after wrapping up “Spreading The Disease”. Jim and I had been talking for a while and once I heard the bands new music I was sold.

How did you come up with your band name?

Jim: Again that was Kamil, he showed me all these metal names like ‘Chocolate Vag Hunter’ or ‘Stab Christ’, I can’t even remember most of them but then there was ‘HEDRA’, I asked him what it meant, he wouldn’t tell me so I found it on urban dictionary instead and coined a phrase from there, go look!

Kamil: I had a dream where someone was saying Hedra, Hedra so I took that as an omen. Everyone liked it so we stuck with it. Later I found out that is one of the plant species in Latino language. Lol

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

Jim: Originally I was meant to be from California, mum was on hols and spat me out here in Norfolk, so yeah I’m a Norwich bloke aright bor, the metal scene is superb here, the rock scene is not great at all, although it does get a bigger crowd its mostly covers or stuff that doesn’t float any boats in my opinion, the metal though is really diverse, some really non influential sounds which is where I developed the need to do the same!

Sean: I live in Norwich, close to one of the big ‘small, local venues’ called the Brickmakers, and it amazes me some of the bands that play there! The scene is super cool and there are some really good local bands doing their thing.

Simon: I live in Norwich, the scene over here is not that bad. There are nice local bands that amaze me. There is a good local venue called the Brickmakers. You can see plenty of local bands and even those from outside of the area.

Kamil: I’m from Poland. The district where I used to live was known for metal bands…Vader , Christ Agony , Nyia!

Steve: I live in Kent but not native to it, I grew up in Spain near Barcelona though am British by birth. Cambridge area.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

Jim: We’ve done some singles – ‘Karma in Blood’, ‘Polaris’, ‘Broken Bones’ but that’s all stuff meant for the Album release, we realised people had been waiting a long time, 3 years, for something since our first one so we put those out to show a new sound, I love them so much, we worked hard on them, not some churn out quick mumbo jumbo!

Simon: Since our “Mind Dimension” EP we released three singles, ‘Karma in Blood’, ‘Polaris’ and ‘Broken Bones’. We also did a homemade video for ‘Broken Bones’, it’s available on Youtube.

Kamil: Our recent release is single and video for ‘Broken Bones’

‘Broken Bones’ (Covid-19 Lockdown Video)

Who have been your greatest influences?

Sean: Growing up I loved Joey Jordison (Slipknot) and Chris Adler (Lamb of God), but as I started to play in bands and learn that it is not all about going 100 miles a minute, every minute! I learned to love drummers like Roy Mayorga (Stone Sour) who has a fantastic presence on stage and most importantly, Ray Luzier (Korn), any time I watch those guys play I want to grab my sticks and play for days on end! – I met Ray last year at the UK drum show, and I totally idolise the guy, I had to go have a pint of beer afterwards to stop myself from shaking I was so in awe of meeting the guy! *Laughs* but in all seriousness, his playing always reminds me why I love playing drums and without that I wouldn’t being playing anymore.

Jim: I have so many but Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, I’m not really a vocalist you see, I’m a guitarist but that’s good because it means I don’t want to be like any vocalist as such although saying that I’ve always loved Devin Townsend since the Sex & Religion Album with Steve Vai and would often change the vocals in my mind whilst on my cycling deliveries when that came out so there’s always going to be him in my voice, I also really got into Will Haven, that was mostly after I discovered my voice then found someone similar doing the same thing, if you listen to ‘Lost I Am Hate’ off our first EP, it sounds just like Will Haven but Kamil had written that song before I even joined so I just added that sound to it, its fucking great but now I just don’t want to sound like anything!

Simon: I started my adventure with guitar after listening to Joe Satriani and Steve Vai. After that I get in to Megadeth and Dream Theater. I was so impressed by Dream Theater that eventually I get in to Liquid Tension Experiment. Guitarists like Yngwie Malmsteen, Steve Lukather, Andy Timmons, Steve Morse, Kiko Loureiro and many others. I just want to grab my guitar and start to play, also bass players like Victor Wooten, Marcus Miller and Brian Bromberg. There is that magic when you hear that bass…

Kamil: Mnemic ! This band is my all-time favourite running in my veins. Every time when I hear them, I have Goosebumps. Also, Kobong , Slipknot , RATM, Machine Head , Fear Factory, Born of Osiris, Korn , Tool, Decapitated , American Head Charge, Henryk Mikolaj Gorecki…

Steve: I grew up with Sabbs, Slade, Quo, Zep, AC/DC, moving along into Metallica, Soundgarden, Ramstein, Slipknot, Five Finger Death Punch, Disturbed all have influenced my music over time.

What first got you into music?

Sean: Music in general?! Listening to Richie Kavanagh (Irish comedy singer) hanging out the sunroof of my Dad’s car. My Dad is Irish and a complete nutter. We used to fly up and down the single-track road with this ‘diddly-dee’ music blasting out the speakers and I would sing at the top of my voice. It’s the earliest memory I have of music. Getting into drums?! My best friend at school wanted to play drums or bass, and I thought ‘screw you! I will have the cool instrument!’ – Begged my Mum to get me a drum kit and one day this kit rocks up from Argos. I shat my pants a bit, I had no idea what I was doing, but I got pretty good pretty quick just teaching myself, and then 16 years later, here I am!

Jim: To be fair it was my sister, she was dating a guy that liked metal, he claimed he was in a band called Praying Mantis, Matt McRoberts, I remember him well and the noises he made with my sister in the next bedroom, but yeah he’d bring me Raw Magazine £1 or Kerrang £1 and some mix tape always featuring Praying Mantis and bands like Metallica so that’s where the love started, realistically though he probably gave me those to listen to drown out those sounds next door at the time.

Simon: That’s my brother’s fault and his collection of Iron Maiden CD’s and Cassettes. I remember when I sneaked into his room to grab some of that treasure. I was like 10 or 11. I remember when I first listened to “No Prayer For The Dying”.

Kamil: First album of RATM. I just love that album. It was something new and so powerful. I listened to that album and felt that music, that is what I wanted to do.

Steve: Some people I knew, older than I, used to listen to Black Sabbath in an ol van they had but they would not let me in on it, so I asked my ol man to bring back some Sabbs albums from the UK to Spain when he travelled. He brought me back Sabotage (To this day my all-time favourite album), We Sold Our Soul For Rock n Roll, Quo live and Zep one album, I was hooked. That said, I was first introduced to music by my Uncle John, a true Rockabilly , he gave me an old record player and a bunch of singles that I played to death, Old Shep by Elvis, Flowers To San Francisco, Stupid Cupid, My Ol Mans A Dustman were some of them.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Jim: I’ve asked before, Robb Flynn, Devin Townsend, Phil Anselmo, the bastards don’t come back to you though do they, one day they’ll be asking me though, I’m joking, as I said I’m no vocalist.

Sean: Corey Taylor: For sure! Is there anything that guy can’t do?!

Simon: Kiko Loureiro, Jakub Zytecki, Nick Johnson, Steve Morse and many others. I will keep my list short.

Kamil: Devin Townsend. This guy is brilliant, John Browne from Monuments , Tom Morello from RATM! It’s only top of the pick. There are so many musicians that you could learn from!

Steve: Either Ozzy or Slipknot.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Jim: I’d just like to play Bloodstock to be honest, so many friends have asked when we will be playing it, I love the Family that run it they’re all ace, unfortunately they’ve chosen a shit show of a protection barrier that’s missing all the decent bands, I shouldn’t say it because that flattens my chances I know but ffs, stop putting on bands that only want to play and then split up and look for dedication please!

Sean: Wacken, or maybe Hellfest, I have some friends in Finland that I made through Twitch and it would be great to see them! Plus, I have another friend who works in a brewery there, so I reckon we would be well looked after, if you get my drift…

Simon: Bloodstock and Wacken, I would love to get to Budokan to play there one day.

Kamil: I would choose all of them from the smallest one to absolutely gigantic. I love playing. Stage is my home but obviously if it’s a bigger house , then more comfortable you will feel.

Steve: I have many tbh, including Download, Bloodstock, Sweden Rocks, Wacken, Knotfest, Ozzfest, list is endless.

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Jim: Never received a weird gift, or anything from a fan to be honest, 2 in a bed, does that count as a gift?

Sean: I had someone throw a paper aeroplane at me mid-gig with my name and loads of hearts all over it, I couldn’t wait for the gig to end and get some nookie, until I found out it was from a guy.

Simon: I don’t think I have a fan, so nothing yet.

Kamil: Bag of biscuits and I don’t know why lol.

Steve: A Scots lass with big tits offered herself to me at a gig, does that count??

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Jim: I really feel uncomfortable with the word fan, I always have, it’s like your ego is to big to accept music friends, so nah we have HEDRA friends (check the group) I’ve always wanted to be a friend of Iron Maiden not a fan, change that phrase please, my message is you’re all my friends that’s why I do music.

Sean: Cliché, but thank you and I love every one of you – this is my therapy, to play drums with awesome people, have fun, put smiles on people’s faces, I will be eternally grateful for that.

Simon: Thank you for supporting and love you all!!!

Kamil: I will say Thank you all for your support.

Steve: I consider all our “Fans” friends. Enjoy your music, look after yourselves and those near to you, help and support others when possible and as far as the band is concerned we are honoured that you like what we do, you are our friends and we appreciate you very much thank you.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Sean: Dimebag Darrell, that guy was a fucking genius!!

Jim: Jimi Hendrix, I know we really would get on so well!

Simon: Randy Rhoads!

Kamil: Dimebag Darrell!!! He was a legend. The Harry Potter of musicians. Absolutely brilliant guitarist!

Steve: Chris Cornell.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Jim: Creation, to think outside the box, be something no one else is even thinking about, not following the masses, the spoon-fed, meeting likeminded people from all over, being proud to produce a masterpiece in my mind, stress relief from normal life, always hated normality, I’d give that up in a heartbeat, buy house, new crap car, have kids, die, nah fuck that, let’s live shall we?

Sean: I love being able to express myself in ways that you can’t with your vocal chords. And hate is a strong word guys, but I strongly dislike that you come across other musicians who are only interested in what they want from you. Thankfully, I have finally found four other guys that when they say ‘Hey, we should do this!’ they actually mean, it instead of ‘Hey Sean! You should do all of this for me! And wipe my ass while you’re at it!’ *laughs*

Simon: The way you can express your feelings and emotions. Freedom that music gives you. There is nothing better than that freedom.

Kamil: I love being a musician and playing gigs, writing music. I hate not being a musician which is 75% what is currently happening to music now.

Steve: I love writing music, being in a band with great people, playing live, recording. The artwork creation etc. the feeling you feel when milestone achievements are made, meeting people, making friends.

I hate that musicians have always been treated like a cheap commodity using them and abusing them and providing livings for so many and yet barely able to feed themselves. it is disheartening.

I also hate to watch this industry dissolve very slowly into an absolute mess over the years, through the golden era to now. I feel very sorry for the future Musicians and industry. Just my view of course.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Jim: Ban streaming that is continuous, yeah streams are good but stop it somewhere and tell people to fucking buy it, I still think it’s the same people that show lack of appreciation for others making effort that leave their crap on the beaches, Spotify emphasises that type of person to the point where we all give up and leave crap on the beach, if someone said ‘right that’s it no more crap on this beach clear it up now or £1000 fine they’d do it.

Simon: Once you get big in industry you will stay big, there is not much opportunity for smaller bands and artists.

Kamil: I really don’t know.

Steve: that’s a tough one, but it would have to be either “Arrogancy/Self-importance” or “Support for each other/tolerance”.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Sean: Dude, I would be here for days…I will give top three: “Great Southern Trendkill” (Pantera), “Ascendancy” (Trivium) & “Audio Secrecy” (Stone Sour).

Jim: “Passion & Warfare” by Steve Vai. Again, there’s no other album or sound like it in the world, you can’t beat it, must have bought that album 5 or 6 times over the years in different formats.

Simon: “Scenes From A Memory” – Dream Theater.

Kamil: Mnemic – “The Audio Injected Soul” 2004.

Steve: “Sabotage” – Black Sabbath.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Jim: Vinyl, I use to buy it as a Junior, back in the day they were crap though so cd was a blessing for quality, there was an oil shortage so they used to get pressed on wafer thin wax, but now you can get greedy bollox 180gm but the sound is so immense it’s like bands are in my front room, of course the nugget generation don’t care about that, that’s another thing that fucking pissed me off about streaming on Spotify, unless you’re a cunt and go for monthly subscription to fund another cunt that won’t help music you won’t get the quality of sound that you really don’t deserve anyway by putting money in a Limewire cunts pocket.

Sean: Controversial, but downloads, Spotify is the best tenner a month I spend.

Jim: @sean cunt!

Simon: I Love CD’s but downloads are more practical these days.

Kamil: Kobong.

Steve: I am dead against streaming and downloading until it is fair for musicians. I love Vinyl for obvious reasons, but the durability of CD’s is probably my preference.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Jim: For me probably the Astoria in London playing my own songs as a headliner with a balcony of people and a sea of cheers below it was amazing, I think that night motorhead had played to less people on their first gig!

Steve: Headlining  the “Bulldog Bash twice” and Playing Bloodstock. Though have toured arenas way back in another life.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

Jim: I’d probably be into cars to be honest I love painting them up anyway.

Sean: Probably still stacking bricks in the middle of a four-acre field! Being a drummer got me out of the shithole and surrounded by my passion which was drums, working in a drum shop!

Kamil: I’ll open Beauty salon lol.

Steve: Footballer or Motorcycle racing.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Sean: Corey Taylor, Dave Lombardo, Phil Anselmo, Matt Heafy and George Forman (as long as he brought his grill, I like steak).

Kamil: Max Cavalera, Jim Root, Corey Taylor!

Steve: Billy Connolly, Ozzy Osbourne, Lee Evans, Jeremy Corbyn, Dave Allen.

What’s next for the band?

Jim: For me it’s a case of getting everyone in the same boat, not following the obvious and working hard to support each other, once that’s done, we’ll be churning out the songs to get the Album out Some videos and gigs etc.

Kamil: Gigs , music writing, gigs and more gigs. Improvement of all aspects related with the band!

Steve: From my point of view finish the new album, tour and look for the support the band needs to take further steps. There’s a fair bit going on in the background too.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

Jim: Spotify lol, no we really do but only until Jan then it’s gone, we’ve got Facebook, ReverbNation and YouTube just look for hedrametal. We’re everywhere really, I hate it, but that’s modern life isn’t it?

Kamil: iTunes , Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Bandcamp

Steve: LinkedIn is good too.

www.facebook.com/hedrametalband/
www.twitter.com/HedraMetal
www.instagram.com/hedrametal/
www.hedrametal.bandcamp.com/
www.youtube.com/channel/UCzwfHW958FARoSxFsvmQTTg

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Jim: Biscuits crunch ffs, so Cake, like it says on the box ok?

Sean: They’re just shit!

Simon: Jaffa Cakes? I’m done…Simon Left…

Kamil: It is evil lol. I have never tried them to be honest.

Steve: Without a doubt a biscuit. And no, I don’t particularly like em.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

Jim: If I sound harsh during this not meant to be, trying to have a giggle but yeah support the music buy the stuff, say hello, we love you all!

Sean: Thank you! It’s a pleasure talking to you guys and hopefully see you out on the road!

Simon: Thank you and hopefully see you soon.

Kamil: Thank you 😊 and hopefully see you soon.

Steve: I wish to thank all the many people including yourselves who have supported, helped, trusted, work with , become friends with myself and the people I spend my time with, thank you everyone for everything it means so much.

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with Dark Matter

EMQ’s with Dark Matter

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Nottingham, UK based Heavy Metal/Hard Rock band, Dark Matter. Huge thanks to them for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Jack: I’m Jack, the lead singer and songwriter (with occasional guitar work on top). I first met our guitarist (Ed) at a jam night organised at Nottingham Uni. I was playing with a few other people at the time, but was hoping to take things a little more seriously with a project a little heavier than my usual blues/rock. Ed (and a couple of others) asked if I was interested in singing on a very impromptu ‘Master of Puppets’ and I tipsily said yes. I was blown away by the accuracy of Ed’s guitar work and asked him if he was looking for a singer, which happened to be exactly what he was looking for as he’d already agreed to meet with James (bassist) and Charlie (our former drummer). We played some covers for a while, then I introduced the band to a song I’d partially written a few years previously but never found a place for, that song was ‘Think of the Children’, which opens our EP. We played our first gig (a battle of the bands) shortly after with a few originals and a bunch of covers and took home first place. We have never looked back.

How did you come up with your band name?

Jack: We brainstormed some ideas, none of which fit, then Ed came into a practice one day and suggested Dark Matter, a name that has now been shouted at me by several hundred people. I don’t think any name could have been more fitting.

Ed: I liked the name because we’re all scientists at Uni, so it links to that and now links to our music as well!

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

Jack: I’m initially from the Isle of Wight, a place where the rock/metal scene can only be described as dead on a good day! Now I’m in Nottingham and we have a vibrant and active pop-punk and alternative scene here. We have a handful of excellent rock/metal pubs and venues that I like to frequent and an active live music scene.

James: We’ve got some really solid local bands like Witch Tripper as well as other bands coming through like Underking and Cottonmouth I definitely think it’s a strong scene where the best is yet to come, it’s a big change from the local scene back home in a village in Oxfordshire!

Ben: I feel lucky, I have lived in both Manchester and Nottingham which both have a thriving Rock/Metal scene from larger bands all the way to newer acts like us. It really shaped me growing up being able to go to so many gigs, watching a wide variety of bands. My love for My Chemical Romance and getting a group of friends to go see them live, way back when, actually lead to the formation of my first band when I was 15.  And hey, living in Nottingham, Download festival is just on our doorstep so that’s always a plus.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

Jack: We released our first EP “Don’t Panic” on 17th April 2020 and have a new single ‘Panic’ being released in September this year.

Who have been your greatest influences?

Jack: That very much depends on what aspect of music you’re asking about! Vocally, I’m hugely inspired by Ronnie James Dio, his is the style I try to emulate without resorting to mimicry, I try to temper this with my softer inspirations such as David Coverdale and Paul Rodgers, anyone listening to Snowflakes will assume I’m also a big fan of Robert Plant and they’d be right to think that! When writing, I try to take inspiration from all of my preferred artists, particularly System of a Down, whose very unique writing style is something I aspire to greatly, but also Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Muse and many many others. Finally, in my guitarwork, I’m unabashedly a blues man, with a particular fondness for Peter Green and Mark Knopfler, the latter of these two being a massive inspiration since (like him) I play without a plectrum.

Ben: Drumming influences would definitely include The Rev, Matt Garstka and Matt Halpern. In my opinion they’re sense of rhythm and creativity is unrivalled. More general influences would include Avenged Sevenfold, Slash, Bullet for My Valentine and the Red Hot Chilli Peppers.

James: The first bassist to come to mind is always Chris Wolstenholme from Muse I’ve always loved how the bass drives Muses sound, the sounds he gets out of his bass are second to none. From the world of metal Geezer Butler has no equals so couldn’t answer this without mentioning him!

What first got you into music?

Jack: I have a been actively listening to music since my Dad first played ‘Voodoo Child’ by Jimi Hendrix to me at the age of 9, he then introduced me to Deep Purple and Lynyrd Skynyrd and I was instantly hooked and seeking out more music. My dad is a blues guitarist and vocalist himself and I’ve always looked up to him, growing up around a professional musician normalised playing and writing from a young age.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Jack: Dave Grohl. His consistency in writing and energy are just so inspiring, every time I see him perform is a delight and it would be an honour to share a stage with him.

Ben: Avenged Sevenfold. They have always been one of my favourite bands and they are incredibly talented musicians. It would be an experience you would definitely learn from.

James: I have to copy Jack and say Dave Grohl. As well as an excellent song writer he would be such a cool guy to hang out with.

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

Jack: Download feels a bit like home at this point and it would be awesome to be the other side of the lights, but I would have to choose Hellfest in Clisson, France. Easily the best festival I’ve been to with consistently incredible line-ups, it’s hard to think of anyone else.

Ben: Download – isn’t it obvious. Been by far my favourite festival to attend where I have discovered many of my favourite bands.

James: I’d love to be a metal band big enough to headline Glastonbury, The Foo Fighters headline set from there gives me goose bumps, Download would also be incredible it’s always fun whatever the weather!

What’s the weirdest gift you have ever received from a fan?

Ben: Haven’t received a gift from  a fan yet but once had a fan start a chant in the crowd in an effort to ask me out, don’t know if that counts.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

Jack: I’m currently writing about 11 songs at the same time, we definitely have a full album in us in the near future!

James: The best is yet to come. Ed’s a riff machine and Jack’s got so many cool songs in the pipeline we’re itching to get back in the studio.

Ben: Thank you for the overwhelming response to our debut E.P. It has honestly been better than I could have ever imagined. We will be back soon I promise!

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

Jack: Jimi Hendrix. It’s an easy choice for me, he had so much left to give and it would have been amazing to see where his music would have gone with just another year, let alone more.

Ben: The Rev from Avenged Sevenfold. He has always been a huge influence on me and was definitely taken from us way too early.

James: Chris Cornell or maybe Jeff Buckley. Both incredible musicians imagine the songs they would have written!

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Jack: It would be very easy to give an artsy answer about how it brings me peace on the worst of days or that it allows me to express my emotions better than anything else, but honestly, I just love everything about it. I’m sure I’ll have gripes and issues in the long term, but this is all I have ever want to be and do. I love writing, I love playing/singing and I love performing. The only thing I hate is coming off-stage.

Ben: As a drummer the hate one is easy, transporting all the gear from venue to venue. The amount of shit you have to carry is almost enough to put you off going at all. But once you’re there nothing really compares to the feeling of getting up on stage and nailing a performance.

James: The stats page in Spotify showing all the countries people are listening to us in, it’s incredible seeing the places our music has reached hopefully we’ll be able to play to some of them one day! The worst part is having to go back to reality after a gig!

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Jack: In metal specifically, it would be to have bands that write about more diverse and interesting topics. Every time I hear the word “throne” in a metal song, I cringe. In general, I would just like the perception of Rock and Metal to be accepted more. I think bands like AC/DC and the Foo Fighters do an incredible job of offering heavier, exciting music to the masses and I would love to see more music of that style promoted.

Ben: As a drummer the amount of songs that replace the drums with samples is infuriating. No one wants perfectly time aligned samples; we want to hear you play and the expression and feel that come with that. Live drums all the way.

James: I think particularly in the UK music is such an asset to the country, I’d love to see more support for Grass roots venues so new, exciting bands get a chance. The next Metallica/Black Sabbath etc are out there waiting for their chance. At the moment campaigns by the likes of the Music Venues Trust are so important so we don’t lose these important grass roots venues in these unprecedented times.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

Jack: “Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV” – Coheed and Cambria. Claudio’s voice isn’t for everyone and some of the lyrics are very forced, but god damn if the song-writing and guitarwork isn’t an absolute masterclass. Such a diverse collection of coherent ideas, this is the album I listen to more than any other for inspiration on song structure.

Ben: It’s tough to pick just one but maybe “Danger Days” by My Chemical Romance. Although it isn’t the best MCR album it had such a personal impact on me and my life growing up and helped lead to the formation of my first band where one of the few songs we played at every gig no matter what was ‘Na Na Na’.

James: RATM self-titled album. Everything from the music to the artwork of the burning monk is perfect.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Jack: I grew up during the changeover between cassettes and CD’s, but I think downloads win for me since they grant such a wide access of music to the whole world.

James: Streaming is certainly most convenient and the best way to discover new bands but there’s something special about owning a piece of the artwork on vinyl.

Ben: CD’s because I don’t own anything that can play Vinyl.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

Jack: Either of the last two that we played: Our triumphant return to the place of our initial Battle of the Bands win was so special, having “DARK MATTER” chanted at us as we went on stage and the wonderful response from those who remembered us so well from the year before. Or our runner-up place in Metal 2 The Masses, which I think was our tightest gig yet. I’m just gutted the momentum had to drop with everything that has happened since March.

Ben: Definitely our heat in the Metal 2 The Masses competition. The first time we’ve played a gig where we had a big enough following that everyone was chanting our name before we went on stage. One of the most surreal feelings for sure.

James: Our M2TM heat was incredible, the turn out was amazing and surreal to have people buying our merch we had just got printed for the first time as well as having them chant our name.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

Jack: I’m a qualified maths teacher, but I certainly wouldn’t be doing that! I would be a tutor most likely, but I honestly don’t know!

Ben: Theoretical Chemist/Physicist, currently doing a PhD in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. It was always Science or Music.

James: I’d be in the lab like Ben although my PhD is in Antibiotic Resistance just like him it’s Science or Music for me.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Jack: Arsene Wenger (I grew up a massive Arsenal fan during his reign), Douglas Adams (author of my favourite book series), Ronnie James Dio (intellectual musical talk is a must!), Paul Rodgers (for the same reason!) and Tom Hanks (because he seems like such a delight!)

Ben: This is where my inner scientist would come out because I would have to include Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking, Richard Feynman and Erwin Schrodinger. The fifth place would be reserved for Slash though, someone’s got to bring the party, right?

James: Gotta be Sir Alex Ferguson who inflicted one of Arsene Wenger’s heaviest defeats in the Premier League in 2011 (8-2). I’d also go with Flea, Dave Grohl, Tom Morello and Chris Wolstenholme.

What’s next for the band?

Jack: A LOT! As many gigs and as many new original songs as I can muster! We have two new songs almost ready for performance (and hopefully recording) with many others in the pipeline! We also have a lot of new merchandise and art planned, which we’re hoping to make very affordable (mostly so I can get some!)

Ben: Hopefully when things get back to some form of normality a lot of gigs. But we do have new music on the way and are always working on new material. I don’t think I’d be alone in saying the next 6-12 months will be really exciting for the band.

James: Hopefully, lots of gigs! But we’re also working on a few things to tide people over until then so keep an eye on our pages.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

James: We’re mainly active on FB but our Insta is becoming increasingly popular whatever your preference it’s easy to keep up to date with us.
Facebook:
www.facebook.com/DarkMatterNotts/
Instagram:
www.instagram.com/darkmatternotts/
Spotify:
www.open.spotify.com/artist/1UTSHjAqAaxm4FwTCOTbpv
Youtube:
www.youtube.com/channel/UCF83l_wEe1NeUN5tpCPSeaQ

Jaffa Cakes! Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Jack: They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, the same goes for the identification of Jaffa Cakes.

Ben: Cake, it’s in the name, right?

James: My head says cake, but my heart says throw them in the bin, forget they exist and pick up a pack of chocolate digestives no ambiguity there with the king of biscuits.

Thank you for your time. Is there anything else that you would like to add?

James: Keep an eye on us! As the world goes back to normal, we’ll be ready to pick up where we left off! We’ll be ready to announce the release date of our follow up single ‘Panic’ soon so follow us on our socials!

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.

EMQ’s with KURSK

EMQ’s with KURSK

Hi everyone! Welcome to our new EMQ’s interview with Suffolk, UK based Heavy Metal band Kursk. Huge thanks to drummer Zoran for taking part.

What is your name, what do you play, and can you tell us a little bit about the history of the band?

Hi, I’m Zoran the drummer for Kursk. The current line-up has been playing together since 2015 but we’ve been mates for years. Me and Luke (Bassist) have known each other since we were 5 years old. I met Jack (Singer and guitarist) when I was about 8 and we started a little covers band together playing the likes of ZZ Top and The Who. I met Tom (Guitarist) in high school when we were 13/14 years old and he joined the band. So, we have known each other for a while. We formed Kursk out of the ashes of that band because we wanted something to create something heavier and give songwriting a go.

How did you come up with your band name?

It was a group decision and comes from the name of a Russian submarine that exploded in a training accident in the year 2000, also it’s a name of a Russian town and where the most infamous tank battle took place in World War 2 (The battle of Kursk).

What Country/Region are you from and what is the Metal/Rock scene like there?

We hail from the county of Suffolk in England. The Music Scene is really good, there are lots of opportunities for small and big bands- lots of venue choices in the area.

What is your latest release? (Album, EP, Single, Video)

Our latest release is our debut self-titled album, released digitally through Wormholedeath back in November 2019.

‘Reaper Of The Night’ Lyric Video

Who have been your greatest influences?

Our biggest influences are Judas Priest, Black Sabbath, Witchfinder General, Motörhead and Iron Maiden. A lot of NWOBHM is present in our sound, as well as a sprinkling of old-school doom elements found in bands like Trouble, Pentagram and St Vitus.

What first got you into music?

My Dad raised me on Heavy Metal. He took me to see Iron Maiden when I was 7 which was my first concert, I loved it. And that was it for me.

If you could collaborate with a current band or musician who would it be?

Working on a track with Tony Iommi or any of the Judas Priest guys would be insane!

If you could play any festival in the world, which would you choose and why?

I would love to play either Bloodstock festival or Download festival either of them would be awesome.

If you had one message for your fans, what would it be?

We really appreciate your support and we can’t wait to get back out there gigging, writing and releasing more music for you. Support local bands and small venues, they are the backbone of the music scene, especially in these strange times.

If you could bring one rock star back from the dead, who would it be?

That’s a hard one, there are too many. If I was to choose one, probably John Bonham, I would love to see him play live.

What do you enjoy the most about being a musician? And what do you hate?

Seeing people in the crowd having fun listening to our music. The thing I hate most is moving my kit about.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?

Smaller bands getting more opportunities, and ending pay-to-play gigs.

Name one of your all-time favourite albums?

There’s so many again; “Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son” by Iron Maiden. I can keep listening to that over and over.

What’s best? Vinyl, Cassettes, CD’s or Downloads?

Physical copies I’d say are better for supporting bands. But for ease, definitely downloads. I prefer CD’s and vinyl over anything.

What’s the best gig that you have played to date?

We put on a show at a local venue at home with a couple bands we are friends with. It got off to a terrible start, with PA problems meaning we had to hire some speakers last minute, delaying the gig. It was a cellar venue at the top of a pub, and we played in the middle of summer. The place was completely packed, and the crowd were so up for it after waiting for ages. Due to the volume, we had to keep the windows shut throughout. Have never felt heat like It. That one stands out a lot for me.

If you weren’t a musician, what else would you be doing?

Woodworking probably as I love making things.

Which five people would you invite to a dinner party?

Rob Halford, Nicko McBrain, Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler, Steve Harris.

What’s next for the band?

Gigging, writing, jamming. Getting ourselves out there as much as we can, promoting the album and getting up and down the country.

What Social Media/Website links do you use to get your music out to people?

We are on most of the online streaming services like Spotify, Amazon Music and Apple Music. We also use Facebook and Instagram to let people know about gigs and up and coming news.
www.instagram.com/kursk.band/
www.facebook.com/Kurskmusic/
www.spotify.com/album/0EKVKXBeoqTJxfXCZaIpeu

Jaffa Cakes? Are they a cake or a biscuit?

Cake because it’s not hard like a biscuit and also it has cake in the name.

Disclaimer: This interview is solely the property of Ever Metal. It is strictly forbidden to copy any part of this interview, unless you have the strict permission of said party. Failure to adhere to this will be treated as plagiarism and will be reported to the relevant authorities.